Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
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Person and Place Index  *  Close
David Herris [or Harris]

(d. 1583)

Alderman. Of Bristol. (K. G. Powell, The Marian Martyrs and the Reformation in Bristol (Bristol, 1972))

David Herris arrested Thomas Hale and carried him to Newgate on 24 April 1557. 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

 
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John Stone

Sheriff of Bristol (1557).

John Stone arrested Thomas Hale and carried him to Newgate on 24 April 1557. 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

[Relative of Edward Campion, who assisted Campion when he got into trouble at Oxford. But his will contains protestant sentiments and he bequeathed money to have John Northbrook preach sermons. (K.G. Powell, The Marian Martyrs and the Reformation in Bristol (Bristol, 1972), passim.]

 
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Richard Sharp

(d. 1557)

Weaver. Martyr. Of Bristol.

Richard Sharp was brought before Dalby, chancellor of Bristol, on 9 March 1556 and persuaded to recant. 1563, p. 1736, 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

Sharp made his recantation in church on 29 March 1556. 1563, p. 1736, 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

He later retracted his recantation and was arrested by the constables. He was taken to Newgate. 1563, p. 1736, 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

He was examined by the chancellor and condemned. 1563, p. 1736, 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

He was burned at Bristol on 7 May 1557. 1563, p. 1736, 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

[May have been confused with Edward Sharp and so not actually exist. See K.G. Powell, The Marian Martyrs and the Reformation in Bristol (Bristol, 1972), p. 14.]

 
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Thomas Benion

(d. 1557)

Weaver. Martyr. Of Bristol.

Thomas Benion was brought by a constable before Dalby on 13 August 1557. 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

Benion was examined and condemned by Dalby on 20 August 1557. 1570, p. 2252, 1576, pp. 1945-46, 1583, p. 2053.

He was burned at Bristol on 27 August 1557. 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2053.

 
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Thomas Hale

(d. 1557)

Shoemaker. Martyr. Of Bristol.

Thomas Hale was taken from his home by David Herris and John Stone and sent to Newgate on 24 April 1557. 1563, p. 1736, 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

He claimed that Herris and Stone had been looking to persecute him for two years. 1563, p. 1736, 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

He was examined and condemned by Dalby. 1563, p. 1736, 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

He was burned at Bristol on 7 May 1557. 1563, p. 1736, 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2053.

 
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William Dalby

(fl. 1536 - 1560)

Fellow of All Souls College (1536). B.C.L. (1538). Chancellor of Bristol. Prebend of Bristol. Held several Gloucestershire livings during Mary's reign. Deprived of all livings in 1560. (Emden and Fasti)

William Saxton was brought before Dalby, who committed him to prison and condemned him. 1583, p. 2148.

Thomas Benion was brought by a constable before Dalby on 13 August 1557. 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

Thomas Benion was examined and condemned by Dalby on 20 August 1557. 1570, p. 2252, 1576, pp. 1945-46, 1583, p. 2053.

 
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Bristol
Bristoll, Brystoll, Bristow, Bristowe
NGR: ST 590 730

A city and county of itself, between the counties of Gloucester and Somerset. 34 miles south-west by south from Gloucester, 12 miles north-west from Bath. Bristol is the seat of a diocese, established in 1542. The city comprises the parishes of All Saints, St. Augustine, Christ Church, St. Owen, St. John Baptist, St. Leonard, St. Mary le Port, St. Mary Redcliffe, St. Michael, St. Nicholas, St. Peter, St. Werburgh, St. Stephen and St. Thomas. Also the Temple parish, and parts of St. James, St. Paul, St. Philip and St. Jacob. All are within the peculiar jurisdiction of the bishop. Christ Church, St. John Baptist, St. Mary le Port, St. Michael, St. Peter, St. Stephen and St. Werburgh are discharged rectories. St. Leonard, St. Mary Redcliffe, St. Nicholas, The Temple, St. Philip and St. Jacob are discharged vicarages. St. James and St. Thomas are perpetual curacies, the latter annexed to the vicarage of Bedminster, Archdeaconry of Bath, Diocese of Bath and Wells.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Launceston
Launceston
NGR: SX 332 847

A borough, market town and parish, possessing separate jurisdiction, locally in the northern division of the hundred of East, county of Cornwall. 20.5 miles north-east by east from Bodmin. The living is a perpetual curacy in the Archdeaconry of Cornwall, diocese of Exeter

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Sothenhey
Sothenbey, Sothenhey
NGR:

Not identified

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2076 [2052]

Queene Mary. The Martyrdome of Prestes wife, Thomas Hale, and Richard Sharpe, with others.

MarginaliaAnno 1558. Nouem.yet this fauour they pretended after her iudgement, that her life should be spared, if she would turne & recant. Nay, that will I not (sayd she:) God forbyd that I shoulde loose the life eternall for this carnall and shorte life. I wyll neuer turne from my heauenly husband, to my earthly husband: from the feloshippe of aungels, to mortall children: And if my husband and children be faythfull, then am I theirs. God is my father, God is my mother, God is my Sister, my Brother, my Kinsman, God is my frend moste faythfull.

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MarginaliaThe womādeliuered to the Shrieffe and led to the place of execution.Then was she deliuered to the Shiriffe, & innumerable people beholding her, she was led by the officers to the place of executiō, without the walles of Exeter, called Sothenhey, where agayne these superstitious priestes assaulted her: and she prayed them to haue no more talke wyth her, but cryed still, God be merciful to me a sinner, God be mercifull to me a sinner. And so whiles they were tying her to the stake, thus still she cried, and would geue no answere to thē, but with much pacience tooke her cruel death, and was with the flames and fire consumed: and so ended

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MarginaliaThe patient Martyrdome of a poore woman at Exeter, being one Prestes wyfe.¶ The cruell burning of a woman at Exeter.
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The poor woman, finally identified as 'one Prestes wyfe' was sufficiently important to warrant a new, third, small woodcut of a woman at the stake. She has been given strong individual features.

this mortall life as cōstant a woman in the fayth of Christ, as euer was vpon the earth. She was as simple a womā to see to as any man might beholde: of a very little & short stature, somewhat thicke, about 54. yeares of age. She had a chearefull countenance, so liuely, as though she had bene prepared for that day of her mariage to meete the Lambe: most pacient of her wordes & answeres, sober in apparel, meat & drinke, and would neuer be idle: a great comfort to as many as would talke with her: good to the poore: and in her trouble, mony, she sayde, she woulde take none: for she sayd, I am going to a city wher mony beareth no maistry: whiles I am here, God hath promised to feede me. Thus was her mortall life ended. For whose constancie God be euerlastingly praysed. Amen.

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Touching the name of this woman (as I haue nowe learned) 

Commentary  *  Close

In the 1563 edition, Foxe did not know Mrs Prest's name and, in fact, he never learned her first name.

she was the wife of one called Prest, dwelling in the Dioces of Exeter, not farre from Launceston.

¶ The Persecution and Martyrdome of three godly men burnt at Bristow, about the latter yeares of Queene Maries reigne. 
Commentary  *  Close
Sharp, Benion and Hale

This account reached Foxe as the 1563 edition was nearing completion and it was printed in an appendix to the first edition (1563, p. 1737). The account was integrated into the main text in the 1570 edition, but beyond that, it remained unchanged in subsequent editions. Whoever Foxe's sources were for these martyrs, they appear to have been reliable. The charges against Richard Sharpe survive ina Cause Book in the Bristol Archive (K. G. Powell, The Marian Martyrs and theReformation in Bristol [Bristol: 1972], pp. 13-14).

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MarginaliaThe story of three Martyrs which suffered at Bristow.IN writing of the blessed Sayntes, which suffered in the bloudy dayes of queene Mary, I had almost ouerpassed the names and story of three godly Martyrs, whiche with theyr bloud gaue testimony likewise to þe gospell of Christ, being condemned and burnt in the town of Bristow. The names of whom were these:

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MarginaliaMartyrs.Richard Sharpe.
Thomas Benion.
Thomas Hale.

MarginaliaRichard Sharpe Martyr.First, Richarde Sharpe, Weauer, of Bristowe, was brought the 9. day of Marche. an. 1556. before MarginaliaM. Dalby Chauncellour of Bristow, persecutour.M. Dalbye Chauncellour of the Towne or City of Bristow, and after examination concerning the sacrament of the aultar, was perswaded by the sayde Dalbye and others, to recant, and the 29. of the same moneth was enioyned to make his recantation before the Parishioners in his parish Churche. Which whē he had done, he felt in his cōscience such a tormenting hell, that he was not able quietly to worke in his occupation, but decayed and chaunged, both in colour and liking of his body. Who shortly after vpon a sonday came into his parish Church, called Temple, & after high masse, came to the queere doore & sayd with a loud voyce: Neighbors, beare me recorde that yonder Idoll (and poynted to the aultar) is the greatest and most abhominable that euer was: and I am sory that euer I denied my Lord GOD. Then the Constables were commaunded to apprehende him, but none stepped forth, but suffered him to goe out of the Church. After by night he was apprehended and caried to Newgate, & shortly after, he was brought before the sayd Chauncellor, denying the sacrament of the aultar to be the body & bloud of Christ, & sayd, it was an Idoll, MarginaliaRichard Sharpe condemned.and therfore was cōdemned to be burnt by the sayd Dalby, He was burnt the 7. of May. 1557. and dyed godly, paciently, and constantly, confessing the articles of our fayth.

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¶ Thomas Hale, Martyr.

MarginaliaThomas Hale, Martyr.THe Thursday in the night, before Easter. 1557. came one M. Dauid Herris Alderman, & Iohn Stone, to þe house of one Thomas Hale, a Shoomaker, of Bristowe, & caused him to rise out of his bedde, & brought hym foorth of his dore. To whō þe said Tho. Hale said: You haue sought my bloud these two yeares, & now much good do it you wt it. Who being committed to the watchmen, was caried to Newgate, the 24. of April, the yere aforesaid was brought before M. Dalby the Chancelor committed by him to prison, & after by him condemned to be burnt, for saying the sacrament of the altar to be an Idoll. He was burned the 7. of May, with the foresayd Rich. Sharpe, & godly, paciently, and constantly embracing the fire with his armes.

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MarginaliaThe Martyrdom of Richard Sharpe, and Thomas Hale at Bristow. Anno. 1557. May. 7.Two Godly Martyrs burned at Bristow.
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Richard Sharpe & Thomas Hale were burned both together in one fire, and bound backe to backe.

Thomas Benion.

MarginaliaThomas Benion Martyr.THomas Benion a Weauer, at the commaundement of the Commissioners, was brought by a Constable, the thirtenth daye of August. 1557. before Mayster Dalbye Chauncellour of Bristow, who committed him to pryson for saying there was nothing but bread in the Sacrament as they vsed it. Wherefore, the twenty day of the sayd August he was condemned to be burnt by the sayd Dalby, for denying fiue of theyr Sacramentes, and affirming two,

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that
VVVVv.ij.
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