Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Alice [or Agnes] Snoth

(d. 1556)

A widow. Martyr. Of Kent.

Agnes Snoth was committed to the sheriff of Canterbury. 1563, p. 1469, 1570, p. 2031, 1576, p. 1751, 1583, p. 1858.

She was burned on 31 January 1556 at Canterbury. 1563, p. 1469, 1570, p. 2031, 1576, p. 1751, 1583, p. 1858.

Nicholas Harpsfield urged on Snoth's condemnation, so that she could be burned before the death of Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

She was burned at Canterbury on 31 January 1556. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

[Also referred to as Agnes Snottle.]

 
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Christopher Brown

(d. 1558)

Martyr of unknown occupation. Of Maidstone, Kent.

Nicholas Harpsfield urged on Christopher Brown's condemnation, so that he could be burned before the death of Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

Brown was burned at Canterbury in 1558. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Corneford

(d. 1558)

Martyr of unknown occupation. Of Wrotham, Kent.

Nicholas Harpsfield urged on the condemnation of John Corneford so that he could be burned before the death of Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

Corneford produced his own sentence of condemnation against the papists. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

He was burned at Canterbury in 1558. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Herst

(d. 1558)

Martyr of unknown occupation. Of Ashford, Kent.

Nicholas Harpsfield urged on John Herst's condemnation, so that he could be burned before the death of Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1673 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

Herst was burned at Canterbury. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Julian Living

Wife of William Living. Of Auborn, Lincolnshire.

Julian Living was held in London for her beliefs around the time that news of Mary's sickness began to spread. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

She was examined before Darbyshire, Cluney and Dale and placed in Lollards Tower. 1563, pp. 1674-75, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1957, 1583, pp. 2063-64.

She was delivered by the death of Mary. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1957, 1583, p. 2063.

 
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Katherine Knight

(d. 1558)

Alias Tynley. An aged woman. Martyr. Of Kent.

Nicholas Harpsfield urged on Katherine Knight's condemnation, so that she could be burned before the death of Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

She was burned at Canterbury in 1558. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

[Mother of Robert Tynley.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Nicholas Harpsfield

(1519? - 1575)

Archdeacon of Canterbury; vicar-general of London. Author of the most important contemporary attack on the Acts and Monuments. Younger brother of John Harpsfield [DNB]

Nicholas Harpsfield discussed the sacrament and ceremonies with Thomas Hawkes on 30 June 1554, but soon gave up hope of changing Hawke's opinions. 1563, p. 1156; 1570, p. 1764; 1576, p. 1507; 1583, p. 1590

Harpsfield took depositions regarding John Tooley's heretical speech from the gallows. 1563, p. 1144

He examined Thomas Wattes on 4 May 1555 and he urged Wattes to recant. Wattes refused, telling Harpsfield that his efforts were in vain. 1563, p. 1165; 1570, p. 1771; 1576, p. 1512; 1583, 1596

Nicholas Harpsfield is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

On 28 May Nicholas Harpsfield had the mayor's sergeant bring John Bland before him, and Master Collins (comissary), in Thornden's house. Talk took place between Harspfield, Collins and Bland. 1563, pp. 1220-21, 1570, pp. 1845-46, 1576, pp. 1579-80, 1583, p. 1667.

On 21 May Bland appeared in the chapter house before Nicholas Harspfield. 1563, pp. 1221-23, 1570 p. 1846, 1576 p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Bland asked that Richard Thornden, bishop of Dover, and Robert Collins, commissary, be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Nicholas Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Nicholas Sheterden discussed eucharistic doctrine with the archdeacon Nicholas Harpsfield and Robert Collins. 1563, pp. 1231-32, 1570, p. 1853, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, pp. 1673-74.

William Cokar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Richard Colliar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Hopper was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Henry Lawrence was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Sterne was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

George Brodbridge was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August for having refused to say confession to a priest. 1563, p. 1273. The examination is referred to in 1570, p. 1884, 1576, p. 1614, 1583, p. 1708.

Anthony Burwarde was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

Robert Streater was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

James Tutrye was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

John Webbe was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden. 1563, pp. 1386-87, 1570, pp. 1959-60, 1576, p. 1687, 1583, p. 1794.

Harpsfield is described as a great persecutor. 1563, p. 1546, 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1954.

Thomas Alsey met with John Kingston to discuss the delivery of forty-six shillings and eight pence to Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Martin Bradbridge was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Final was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Hay was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Thomas Hudson was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Stephen Kempe was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Lowick was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

John Philpot of Tenterden was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Matthew Plaise was examined by Thornden, Nicholas Harpsfield and Collins. 1570, pp. 2169-71, 1576, pp. 1873-75, 1583, pp. 1982-83.

Harpsfield took part in Richard Woodman's fifth and sixth examinations. 1563, pp. 1599-1601, 1570, pp. 2190-94, 1576, pp. 1890-93, 1583, pp. 1999-2002.

William Prowting was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Thomas Stephens was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Waterman was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Harpsfield urged on the condemnation of five martyrs at Canterbury so that they could be burned before the death of Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

Harpsfield was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Tynley

Of unknown occupation. Of Maidstone in Kent.

Robert Tynley was persecuted during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

He talked about prayer books and religion with his mother. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

[Son of the martyr Katherine Knight, alias Tynley.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Living

Minister. Of Auborn, Lincolnshire.

William Living was held in London for his beliefs around the time that news of Mary's sickness began to spread. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

He was visited by Cox the promoter in the company of John Launce of the Greyhound Inn. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

William Living told John Launce and others to return later, at which point Dean the constable and George Hancock the beadle searched Living's books and found a copy of a work by Joahnnes de Sacro Bosco. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

Living and his wife were arrested and taken from Shoe Lane through Fleet Street to St Paul's Churchyard and thence to Darbyshire's house. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

Living had a talk with Darbyshire. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

Living said that he was made a minister at Aubourn. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

He was put in the stocks at Lollard's Tower and had his leg in the same hole that John Philpot had. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

Cluney eventually brought him meat and then took him to Darbyshire who presented him with a list of names. Living said he only knew Foster's name on the list. He was ordered to pay 15 shillings to Cluney. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

Living was delivered by the death of Mary. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

 
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Ashford
Ashford, Ashforde
NGR: TR 010 428

A parish in the hundred of Chart and Longbridge, lathe of Scray, county of Kent. 20 miles south-east by east from Maidstone. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Canterbury.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Canterbury
Cant., Canterb., Canterbury, Caunterbury, Caunterburye,
NGR: TR 150 580

An ancient city and county of itself, having separate jurisdiction. Locally in the hundred of Bridge and Petham, lathe of St. Augustine, eastern division of the county of Kent. 26 miles south-east by east from Rochester. The city comprises the parishes of All Saints, St. Alphege, St. Andrew, St. George, The Holy Cross, St. Margaret, St. Martin, St. Mary Bredman, St. Mary Bredin, St. Mary Magdalene, St. Mary Northgate, St. Mildred, St. Peter and St. Paul, all in the Diocese of Canterbury, and with the exception of St. Alphege and St. Martin within the Archdeaconry of Canterbury. The living of All Saints is a rectory with St. Mary in the Castle and St. Mildred attached; St. Alphege is a rectory exempt, united with the vicarage of St. Mary Northgate; St. Andrew is a rectory with St. Mary Bredman annexed; St. George is a rectory with St. Mary Magdalene annexed; St. Martin's is a rectory exempt with St. Paul's annexed; St. Peter's is a rectory with Holy Cross annexed; St. Mary Bredin is a vicarage; and St. Margaret's is a donative in the patronage of the Archdeacon

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Maidstone
Maidstone, Maydstone
NGR: TQ 760 555

A borough and parish, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Maidstone, lathe of Aylesford, county of Kent, of which it is the county town. 8 miles south from Rochester. The living is a perpetual curacy in the peculiar jurisdiction and patronage of the Archbishop of Canterbury

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Wrotham
Wrotham
NGR: TQ 612 591

A parish in the hundred of Wrotham, lathe of Aylesbury, county of Kent. 11 miles west-north-west from Maidstone. The living comprises a sinecure rectory and a vicarage, in the exempt Deanery of Shoreham, and in the peculiar jurisdiction and patronage of the Archbishop of Canterbury.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2077 [2053]

Queene Mary. The Martyrdome of fiue Martyrs at Canterbury.

MarginaliaAnno 1558. Nouemberthat is: the Sacrament of the body and bloud of Christ, and the Sacrament of Baptisme. He was burnt the seuen and twenty of the sayd moneth, and yeare, and dyed god-

MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of Thomas Benion at Bristow. Anno. 1557. August. 27.Thomas Benion burned at Bristow.
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ly, constantly and patiently, with confessing the articles of our christian fayth.

¶ The Martyrdome of fiue constant Christians, which snffered the last of all other in the time of Queene Mary. 
Commentary  *  Close
Five Martyrs at Canterbury

A short version of this account, based on the trial documents from a now lost Canterbury court book, first appeared in the 1563 edition. An anecdote about the burning of Alice Snoth or Agnes Snoth was added to the 1563 edition as it was nearing completion and it was placed in an appendix at the rear of the volume (1563, p. 1735). In the 1570 edition, this anecdote was incorporated into the account of these martyrs. Another anecdote, about Katherine Tynley, was added to this account in the 1570 edition. There were no further changes to this account in subsequent editions.

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MarginaliaNouember. 10.THe last that suffred in Queene Maries time, were fiue at Caunterburye, burned about sixe dayes before the death of Queene Mary, whose names follow here vnder written.

MarginaliaMartyrs.Iohn Corneford, of Wortham.
Christopher Browne, of Maydstone.
Iohn Herst, of Ashford.
Alice Snoth.
Katherine Knight, otherwise called Katherine
Tynley, an aged woman.

Marginalia5. Last Martyrs that were burned in Queene Maryes tyme.These fiue, to close vp the finall rage of queene Maries persecution, for the testimony of that word, for whiche so many had died before, gaue vp theyr liues, meekly and paciently suffering the violent malice of the Papistes. Which Papists although they then might haue either well spared them, or els deferred theyr death, knowing of the sicknesse of Queene Mary: yet such was the implacable despite of that generation, that some there be that say, the Archdeacō of Canterbury the same time being at London, & vnderstanding the daunger of the Queene, incontinently made al post hast home to dispatch these, whom before he had thē in his cruell custody.

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MarginaliaTheir articles why they were condemned.The matter why they were iudged to the fire, was for beleuing the body not to be in the sacrament of the aulter, vnlesse it be receiued, saying moreouer that we receiue an other thing also beside Christes body, which we see, and is a temporall thing, according to S. Paule: The thinges that be sene, be temporall, &c. 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Foxe text narrative, citing St. Paul

Translated into English - no Latin text.

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Item, for confessing that an euill man doth not receiue Christes body: Because no man hath the sonne, except it be geuen him of the father. 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Foxe text narrative, possibly alluding to I John, 2. 23.

Translated into English - no Latin text.

Item, that it is Idolatry to creepe to the crosse and S. Iohn forbidding it, sayth, Beware of Images. 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Foxe text narrative, citing I John, 5. 21

Translated into English - no Latin text.

Itē, for confessing that we should not pray to our Lady and other Sayntes, because they be not omnipotent.

For these and such other articles of Christian doctrine, were these fiue committed to the fire. Agaynst whom whē the sentence shoulde be read, and they excommunicate, after the maner of the papistes, MarginaliaAn example of Gods worke to be noted.one of them, Iohn Cornford by name, styrred with a vehemēt spirit of the zeale of god, proceeding in a more true excōmunication agaynst the pa-

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pistes, in the name of them all, pronounced sentēce against them, in these wordes as folow.

MarginaliaSentence of condemnation pronounced by Iohn Cornford against the Papists.In the name of our Lord Iesus Christ the sonne of the most mighty God, and by the power of his holy spirite, & the authority of his holy catholick & Apostolick church, we do geue here into the handes of Satan, to be destroyed, the bodies of all those blasphemers & hereticks, that do mainteine any error agaynst his most holy word, or do cōdemne his most holy truth for heresy, to the mainteinaunce of any false Churche or fayned Religion, so that by this thy iuste iudgement, O most mighty God, against thy aduersaries, thy true religion may be knowne, to thy great glory, and our comfort, and to the edifying of al our natiō. Good Lord so beit. Amen.

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This sentence of excommunication beyng the same time openly pronounced and registred, proceeding so, as it seemeth from an inwarde fayth and hartye zeale to Gods trueth and Religion, tooke such effect agaynst the enemye, that within sixe dayes after, Queene Mary dyed, and the tyranny of all Englishe Papistes with her. MarginaliaThe cruell dealing of M. Harpsfield the Archdeacon of Canterbury.Albeit, notwithstanding the sicknes and death of that queene, wherof they were not ignorant, yet the Archdeacon, with other of Caunterbury, thought to dispatch the Martyrdome of these men before.

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MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of 3. men and 2. women at Canterbury. Anno. 1558. Nouem. 10.¶ The burning of fiue Martyrs at Caunterbury.
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Commentary on the Woodcuts  *  Close
Another instance in which the picture did not fit the sexes of the group of martyrs.

In the which fact, the tyranny of this Archdeacon seemeth to exceede the crueltye of Boner: who notwithstanding he had certayne the same time vnder his custodye, yet he was not so importune in haling them to the fire, as appeareth by father Liuing and his wife, and diuers other, who being the same time vnder the custody and daūger  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 505, line 19 from the bottom

"Danger" here means power. The word ... occurs too in a doctrinal statement controverted by Sir Thomas More, in his Dialogue against Tribulation, book ii. ch. vi. - "He (Christ) brought us out of the devil's daunger with his dear precious blood," p. 1175, or p. 99, Edit. 1847: also ch. xvi. p. 1194, or p. 152. Is it not used in the same sense in the authorized version of Matt. v. 21, 22? Dr. Jamieson has a good article on the word in his "Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language."

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of Boner, deliuered by the death of Queene Mary, remayne yet some of them aliue.

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These godly martirs in theyr prayers which they made before their martirdome, desired God þt theyr bloud might be the last that should be shed, and so it was.

This Katherine Tynley was the mother of one Robert Tynley now dwelling in Maydstone, which Robert was in trouble all Queene Maryes time. To whom hys Mother comming to visite him, asked him how he tooke this place of Scripture (which she had seene, not by reading of the Scripture, for she had yet in maner no taste of Religion, but had found it by chaunce in a Booke of prayers: MarginaliaIoell. 2.I will poure out my spirite vpon all flesh, and your sonnes and your daughters shall prophesy: your olde men shall dreame dreames, and your young men shall see visions. And also vpon the seruantes, and vpon the maydes in those dayes will I poure my spirite. &c. Which place after that he had expounded to her, she began to take hold on the Gospell, growing more and more in zeale and loue thereof, and so continued vnto her Martyrdome.

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MarginaliaA note of Alice Snoth.Among such young women as were burned at Caunterbury, it is recorded of a certayne mayd, and supposed to be this Alice Snoth here in this story mentioned, or els to be Agnes Snoth aboue storied, 

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For Agnes Snoth see 1563, p. 1469; 1570, p. 2031; 1576, p. 1751 and 1583, pp. 1858-59.

pag. 1751. (for they were

both
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