Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesLatin/Greek TranslationsCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Anne Askew

(1521 - 1546)

Martyr. Second daughter of Sit William Askew of Lincolnshire. [DNB]

Anne Askew was described as a faithful witness of Christ by Robert Glover in a letter to his wife.1563, pp. 1273-80, 1570, pp. 1886-89, 1576, pp. 1615-19, 1583, p. 1710.

In a letter to certain godly women, William Tyms asked them to remember the blessed Anne Askew and her example. 1570, p. 2078, 1576, p. 1792, 1583, pp. 1898-99.

Thomas Fairfax and Richard Wilmot were tormented around the same time as Anne Askew. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

 
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Edward Crome

(d. 1562)

Rector of St Mary, Aldermary, London. [DNB]

Edward Crome was sent to the Fleet on 13 January 1554 by the privy council for preaching without a licence (1583, p. 1418; APC IV, p.384).

Another notice that Crome was committed to the Fleet on 13 January 1554 (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; and 1583, p. 1467).

Ridley reported to Cranmer, in a letter written in the aftermath of the Oxford disputations in April 1554, that Crome, Rogers and Bradford would be taken to Cambridge for a disputation on similar lines to that held in Oxford (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; and 1583, p. 1464).

Crome was a signatory to the letter of 8 May 1554 protesting the proposed disputation at Cambridge. The letter is printed in 1563, pp. 1001-3; 1570, pp. 1639-41; 1576, pp. 1399-1400; 1583, pp. 1469-71.

Ridley praised the piety, integrity and constancy of 'D.C.' in a letter he wrote to Hooper, probably in 1554. 1563, pp. 1051-52; 1570, p. 1677; 1576, p. 1404; 1583, pp. 1504-5. [NB: Only the initials 'D.C.' are given in Foxe's version of the letter, but the name 'Doctor Crome' is given in the version of the letter printed in Letters of the Martyrs, p. 46.]

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Crome was brought before Stephen Gardiner at St Mary Overy's on 30 January 1555. He asked for two months to consider whether he would or would not recant and this was granted to him (1570, p. 1655; 1576, p. 1412; 1583, p. 1483). [Taken from BL Harley MS 421, fols. 43r and 45r].

A copy of one of Crome's recantations was given to George Marsh in an attempt to persuade Marsh to recant. 1570, p. 1733; 1576, p. 1480; 1583, p. 1563.

Bradford was asked by Heath and Day to read a book that had done Dr Crome good. 1563, p. 1208, 1570, p. 1797, 1576, 1524, 1583, p. 1617.

A letter from Ridley and his fellow prisoners to Bradford and his fellow prisoners in the King's Bench in 1554 stated that Ridley longed to hear of Father Crome, Doctor Sandys, Masters Saunders, Veron, Beacon and Rogers. 1563, p. 1294, 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1624, 1583, p. 1724.

Foxe refers to Edward Crome's first recantation. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

Master Tracy secretly took a letter to William Plane and asked him to take it to Crome. Someone read the letter while Plane was out of the house and believed Plane to be the author of its defamatory contents. Plane was sent to the Tower. 1583, p. 2128.

[Also referred to as 'D. C.']

 
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John Baker

(d. 1558)

An Englishman working in Cadiz, Spain. Martyr.

John Baker was apprehended in Seville and burned on 2 November 1558. 1570, p. 2259, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Lewes

A Welshman. Guard.

One day in July [year not filled in in text], a Welshman called Lewes (described as one of the guard) entered the shop where Wilmot was apprentice. Lewes was asked what the news at court was, to which he responded that Crome had appeared before the council and was to appear at Paul's Cross. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

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Wilmot told Lewes that he was sorry to hear the news of Dr Crome. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

Lewes told Wilmot that there had been troubles since the Bible was translated into English, that Crome was a heretic and then falsely accused Cromwell of biblical translation. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

Foxe recounts Wilmot's conversation with Lewes. 1563, p. 1683, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

Wilmot told Lewes that Crome preached nothing but the truth. 1563, p. 1683, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

A young servant of Daubney spoke to Lewes about what he had heard about the charges against Thomas Fairfax and Richard Wilmot. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

 
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Mark Burges

(d. 1560)

Master of the ship, the Minion. Martyr.

Mark Burges was burned in Lisbon, Portugal in 1560. 1563, p. 1729, 1570, p. 2259, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Wilmot

(b. 1540?)

Apprentice to a draper in Bow Lane. Of London but born in Cambridgeshire.

Richard Wilmot was tormented and scourged around the time of the death of Anne Askew. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

One day in July [year not filled in in text], a Welshman called Lewes (described as one of the guard) entered the shop where Wilmot was apprentice. Lewes was asked what the news at court was, to which he responded that Crome had appeared before the council and was to appear at Paul's Cross. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

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Wilmot told Lewes that he was sorry to hear the news of Dr Crome. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

Lewes told Wilmot that there had been troubles since the Bible was translated into English, that Crome was a heretic and then falsely accused Cromwell of biblical translation. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

Foxe recounts Wilmot's conversation with Lewes. 1563, p. 1683, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

Wilmot told Lewes that Crome preached nothing but the truth. 1563, p. 1683, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

Master Daubney's servant, Thomas Fairfax, openly agreed with what Wilmot was saying. 1563, p. 1683, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

Thomas Fairfax and Richard Wilmot were ordered to appear before the lord mayor. Smart, the swordbearer, was sent as messenger to them. 1563, p. 1683, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

The mayor and Chomley examined Wilmot and Fairfax. 1563, p. 1683, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

Roger Cholmley accused Wilmot of being Crome's son. 1563, p. 1684, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

Wilmot and Cholmley discussed one of Crome's sermons. 1563, p. 1684, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

Wilmot said that Lord Rich was his godfather and had baptised him. 1563, p. 1684, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

The wardens of the Drapers' company were sent to speak to Wilmot and Fairfax when in prison and to make suit to the mayor. 1563, p. 1684, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2058.

The mayor went with Wilmot and Fairfax to the council, where they were examined by Winchester and Sir Anthony Brown. 1563, p. 1684, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

It was decided that Wilmot and Fairfax be tied to a cart and whipped three market days through the city. 1563, p. 1684, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

Wilmot and Fairfax appeared in the Drapers' hall with their masters present, and Master Brooke [master of the Drapers] promised £100 from the company for the boys' protection from the death sentence. 1563, p. 1684, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

Wilmot and Fairfax underwent a scourging, during which Brook was particularly brutal. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

Wilmot and Fairfax never returned to full health. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Cromwell

(1485?-1540)

Earl of Essex (1540). Vicegeneral of Spiritual Affairs, Lord Privy Seal, lawyer (1523), MP (1524), member of Gray's Inn (1525). (DNB; Bindoff; G. R. Elton, The Tudor Revolution in Government [Cambridge, 1953])

Dr Buttes, the king's physician, housed Latimer while he was preaching in London. 1563, p. 1309, 1570, pp. 1905-06, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer was offered the benefice of West Kinton, Wiltshire, through the suit of Dr Buttes and Lord Cromwell. 1563, p. 1309, 1570, pp. 1905-06, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer was made bishop of Worcester, assisted by Cromwell and Buttes. 1570, p. 1907, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1738.

Cromwell's character is compared to that of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 1382, 1570, p. 1951, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1785.

Cromwell was sent with Norfolk and Somerset to dine with Cranmer at Lambeth. 1570, p. 2036, 1576, p. 1756, 1583, p. 1862.

Complaints were sent to Cromwell about a priest who was a relative of Chersey of London. 1570, p. 2036, 1576, p. 1756, 1583, p. 1863.

The priest was sent to the Fleet. Cromwell forgot about him and eventually sent him to Cranmer. Cranmer in time spoke to the priest and set him free. 1570, pp. 2036-38, 1576, pp. 1756-57, 1583, pp. 1863-64.

After Cromwell was apprehended, bishops Heath and Skip forsook Cranmer and stood against him. 1570, p. 2040, 1576, p. 1759, 1583, pp. 1865-66.

Cromwell was suspected of protecting John Frith when Frith was imprisoned in the Tower for speaking against the writings of Sir Thomas More. 1583, p. 2126.

Lewes told Richard Wilmot that there had been troubles since the Bible was translated into English, that Crome was a heretic and then falsely accused Cromwell of biblical translation. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Fairfax

Master Daubney's servant. Of London.

Thomas Fairfax openly agreed with Wilmot's defence of Dr Crome. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

Thomas Fairfax and Richard Wilmot were ordered to appear before the lord mayor. Smart, the swordbearer, was sent as messenger to them. 1563, p. 1683, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

The mayor and Sir Roger Chomley examined Wilmot and Fairfax. 1563, p. 1683, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2059.

The wardens of the Drapers' company were sent to speak to Wilmot and Fairfax when in prison and to make suit to the mayor. 1563, p. 1684, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

The mayor went with Wilmot and Fairfax to the council, where they were examined by Winchester and Sir Anthony Brown. 1563, p. 1684, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

It was decided that Wilmot and Fairfax be tied to a cart and whipped on three market days through the city. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

Wilmot and Fairfax appeared in the Drapers' hall with their masters present, and Master Broke [Master of the Drapers] promised £100 from the company for the boys' protection from the death sentence. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

Wilmot and Fairfax were scourged, during which scourging Brook was particularly brutal. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

Wilmot and Fairfax never returned to full health. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Burgate

(d. 1558?)

An Englishman working in Cadiz, Spain.

Burgate was apprehended in Seville on 2 November 1558. 1570, p. 2259, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Hoker

(1544? - 1560)

William Hoker, young Englishman, was stoned to death for his beliefs in Seville in 1560. 1570, p. 2259, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

 
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Lewes
Lewes, Lewys
NGR: TQ 416 095

A borough, chiefly in the hundred and rape of Lewes, county of Sussex, of which it is the chief town. 7 miles north-east by east from Brighton. The borough comprises four parishes; St. Michael' s, which is a discharged rectory; St. Anne's and All Saints, which are the same; and St. John's under the Castle, which is a rectory. All are in the Archdeaconry of Lewes and Diocese of Chichester. The precinct of the castle is extra-parochial

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2082 [2058]

Queene Mary. Englishe Martyrs in Spayne. Certayne scourged for religion.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.goodes: and because it was a deuise that well serued their turne without any more circumstance they bad him saye his Aue Maria. The party began & said it after this maner Aue Maria gratia plena Dominus te cum, benedicta tu in mulieribus & benedictus fructus ventris tui Iesus. Amen. 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
John Fronton saying the 'Ave Maria'
Foxe text Latin


Aue Maria gratia plena Dominus te cum, benedicta tu in mulieribus, & benedictus fructus ventris tui Iesus. Amen.
Sancta Maria mater Dei ora pro nobis peccatoribus.

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

Translation (Wade 2004)


Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord be with you, blessed are you among women, and blessed be Jesus, the fruit of your womb. Amen.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners.

The same was written word by word as hee spake it: and without anye more talke of clayming his goodes because it was booteles, they commaunde him to prison agayne, and enter an action agaynst him as an hereticke, MarginaliaIohn Fronton iudged for an hereticke for not adding to Aue Maria, more then the Scripture hath.for asmuch as he did not say his Aue Maria after the romish fashion, but ended it very suspiciously, for he should haue added moreouer: Sancta Maria mater Dei ora pro nobis peccatoribus, 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
John Fronton saying the 'Ave Maria'
Foxe text Latin


Aue Maria gratia plena Dominus te cum, benedicta tu in mulieribus, & benedictus fructus ventris tui Iesus. Amen.
Sancta Maria mater Dei ora pro nobis peccatoribus.

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

Translation (Wade 2004)


Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord be with you, blessed are you among women, and blessed be Jesus, the fruit of your womb. Amen.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners.

by abbreuiating whereof, it was euident enough (sayd they) that he did not allow the mediation of saintes.

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MarginaliaA quarell picked agaynst the Englishe Marchaunt to spoyle him of his goodes.Thus they picked a quarrell to deteine him in prison a longer season, and afterwardes brought him forth into their stage disguised after theyr manner: where sentence was geuen that he should loose all the goodes whiche he sued for, though they were not his own, and besides this suffer a yeares imprisonment.

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¶ The Martyrdome of an other Englishman in Spayne. 
Commentary  *  Close

The accounts of this Englishman, Baker, Burgate, Burges and Hoker first appeared in the 1563 edition and were unchanged in subsequent editions.

MarginaliaAnother Englishe man burnt in Spayne. MarginaliaRead afore pag 907.AT what tyme this blessed Martyr of Christe suffered, which was the yeare of our Lord. 1560. December. 22. there suffered also an other Englishman, with other xiii. one of them being a Nunne, an other a Fryer, both constant in the Lord. Of which xiii. read before, pag. 934.

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Iohn Baker and William Burgate Martyrs.

MarginaliaIohn Baker. W. Burgate Martyrs in Spayne.IOhn Baker and William Burgate, bothe Englishmen in Cales, in the countrey of Spayne, were apprehended and in the Citty of Siuill burned the second day of Nouember.

¶ Marke Burges and William Hoker Martyrs.

MarginaliaMarke Burges burnt in Lushborne.MArke Burges an Englishman, Mayster of an English ship called the Minion, was burned in Lushborn a citty in Portingale. an. 1560.

William Hoker a young manne, about the age of xvi. yeares, being an Englishman, MarginaliaW. Hoker stoned to death in Siuill.was stoned to death of certayne young men there in the Citty of Siuill, for the confession of his fayth. an. 1560.

But of these and such other actes and matters paste in Spayne, because they fell not within the compasse of Q. Maryes raygne, but since her tyme, an other place shall serue hereafter (the Lord willing) to entreat more at large of the same, when we come to the yeares and raygne of the Queene that now is, where we haue more conueniently to inferre not onely of these matters of the Martyrs (wher of somewhat also hath bene touched before, pag. 907. but also of the whole Inquisition of Spayne, and Plackarde of Flanders, wt the tragical tumults & troubles happening wtin þe last memory of these our latter dayes, according as it shall please the mercy of the Lord to enable our endeuor with grace and space to the accomplishment therof.

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¶ A chapter or treatise concerning such as were scourged and whipped by the Papistes in the true cause of Christes Gospel 
Commentary  *  Close
Scourged Protestants

All of these accounts first appeared in the 1563 edition although they were scattered throughout the end of the volume. In the 1570 edition, Foxe brought these accounts together, and rearranged them. He made no substantive change to their contents, however, and they remained unchanged in subsequent editions. Some of these accounts, such as Thomas Greene's and Stephen Cotton's, are autobiographical; others were sent to Foxe by sympathetic informants.

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MarginaliaA chapter concerning such as were scourged for religion.ANd thus through the mercifull assistaunce and fauourable ayd of Christ our Sauiour, thou hast as in a generall Register (good Reader) the story collected, if not of all, yet of the most part, or at least, not many I trust omitted of such good Sayntes and Martyrs as haue lost theyr lyues, and geuen theyr bloud, or dyed in prison for the testimony of Christes true doctrine and sacramentes, from the time of the cruell MarginaliaOf this Statute read before pag. 523.Statute first geuen out by king Hēry the 4. Ex officio, pag. 523. vnto this present tyme, & especially vnder the raygne of Queene Mary.

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Now after this bloudy slaughter of GODS good sayntes and seruauntes thus ended and discoursed, let vs proceede (by the good pleasure of the Lord) somewhat like wise to entreate of such as for the same cause of Religyon haue bene, although not put to death, 

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The preceding passages were added in the 1570 edition and are a response to the criticisms of Nicholas Harpsfield and other catholic polemicists that Foxe glorified as martyrs those who had not suffered a violent death.

yet whipped and scourged by the aduersaryes of Gods worde, first begynning with Richard Wilmot and Thomas Farefaxe, who about the tyme of Anne Aschue, wer pittifully rent & tormented with scourges and stripes for theyr faythfull standing to christ, and to hys truth, as by the story and examination both of the sayde Rich. Wilmot, and of Thomas Farefaxe nowe following, may appeare.

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The scourging of Richard Wilmot, and Thomas Fayrefaxe. 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 517

{Cattley/Pratt alters the text here to that of the 1563 edition.} The narrative of the sufferings of Wilmot and Fairfax is here given according to the text of 1563, after which it appears to have been most capriciously tinkered by Foxe or his editor.

MarginaliaThe scourging of Richard Wilmot and Tho. Fayrefaxe.AFter the first recantation of Doct. Crome for his Sermon which he made the fift Sonday in Lent at Saint Thomas Acons, being the mercers Chappell, MarginaliaD. Cromes Sermon.his Sermon was on the Epistle of the same day, written in the x. chap. to þe Hebrues, wherein he proued very learnedly by the same place of Scripture and others, that Christ was þe onely and sufficient Sacrifice vnto God the Father, for the sinnes of the whole world, and that there was no more sacrifice to be offered for sinne by the Priestes, for as muche as Christ had offered his body on the Crosse, and shed his bloud for the sinnes of the people, & that once for all. For þe which Sermon he was apprehended of Boner & brought before Stephen Gardyner & other of the Counsell, where he promised to recant his Doctrine at Paules Crosse, þe second Sonday after Easter. MarginaliaD. Cromes recantation.And accordingly, he was there & Preached, Boner wt all his Doctours sitting before him: but he so Preached and handled his matter, that he rather verified his former saying, then denyed any parte of that which he before had Preached. For the whiche the Protestantes praysed God, and hartely reioysed.

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But Byshop Boner with his Champions, were not therewith pleased, but yet notwithstanding they had hym home wt them, & so handled him amongest the woluish generation. that they made him come to the Crosse agayne þe next Sonday.

MarginaliaD. Crome caused to recant the second tyme.And because the Magistrates shoulde now heare him, & be witnesses of this recantation which was moste blasphemous, to deny Christes sacrifice to be sufficient for penitent sinners, & to say that the sacrifice of the Masse was good godly, and a holy sacrifice, propitiatorye and auayleable both for the quicke and the deade: Because (I saye) that they would haue þe nobles to heare this blasphemous doctrine, the viperous generation procured all the chiefe of the Counsell to be there present.

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Nowe to come to our matter at this tyme, the same weeke, betweene his first Sermon and the last, and while Doct. Crome was in duraunce, one MarginaliaRichard Wilmot Prentise in Bow lane.Rich. Wilmot being Prentise in Bow lane, being of þe age of eighteene yeares, and sytting at his worke in his Maysters shop the Tuesday, in þe moneth of Iuly, One MarginaliaLewes one of the Garde, a Welchman a Popishe persecutour.Lewes a Welchmā, being one of the Garde, came into the shoppe, hauing things to doe for himselfe.

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One asked him what newes at the Court, and he answered that the old hereticke D. Crome had recanted now in deede, before the Connsell, and that he should on Sonday nexte bee at Paules Crosse agayne and there declare it.

Then Wilmot sitting at his Maysters worke, & hearing hym speake these wordes and reioysing in the same began to speake vnto hym, saying þt he was sory to heare these newes. MarginaliaWilmot defendeth D. Cromes Sermon.For (sayd he) if Crome should say otherwise then he hath sayd, then is it contrary to the truth of Gods worde, and contrary to his owne conscience, which shall before God accuse hym.

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Lewes aunswered and sayd that he had Preached & taught heresy, and therefore it was meete that he should in such a place reuoke it.

Wilmot tolde him that he would not so say, neyther did he heare hym Preach any doctrine contrary to Gods worde written, but that he proued his doctrine, and that sufficiently by the Scriptures.

Lewes then asked him how he knew that.

Wilmot Aunswered by the Scripture of God, wherein he shall find GODS will and pleasure, what he willeth all men to do and what not to do: and also by them he should prooue and trye all doctrines, and the false doctrine from the true.

Lewes sayde: it was neuer mery since the Bible was in Englishe: MarginaliaThe Lord Cromwell wrongfully accused.and that he was both an hereticke and a traitour that caused it to be translated into Englishe (meaning Cromwell) and therefore was rewarded according to his desertes.

Wilmot aunswered agayne: what his desertes and offences were to his Prince, a great many do not knowe, ney- neyther doth it force whether they do or no: once he was sure that he lost his lyfe for offending his Prince, and the law did put it in execution: Adding moreouer concerning that man, that he thought it pleased GOD to rayse hym vp from a low estate, and to place him in hyghe authority, partly vnto this, MarginaliaThe doinges of the Lord Cromwell defended.that he should do that as all the Bishops in the Realme yet neuer dyd, in restoring agayne Gods holy worde, which being hyd long before from the people in a straunge tongue, & now comming abroad amongest vs, will bring our Byshops & Priestes, sayde he, in lesse

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