Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Anthony Hussey

(d. 1560)

Cranmer's chief registrar. Under Mary registrar in the Court of Arches and of the chapter of St Paul's Cathedral. Governor of the Muscovy Company. Governor of the English merchants in Antwerp. [ See MacCulloch, Cranmer, p. 608 and J. G. Nichols, Narratives, p. 216.]

John Story commanded Thomas Green be brought to Walbrook before the commissioners. He was eventually sent before Hussey. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2051.

Thomas Green told Hussey that John Bean, an apprentice to Tottle, had received a copy of a book called 'Antichrist' from him. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2051.

Elizabeth Young's first examination took place before Hussey. 1570, pp. 2268-69, 1576, pp. 1958-59, 1583, pp. 2065-66.

 
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Appline Grew

Wife of Edward Grew. Of Broke, Norfolk.

Appline Grew did all she could to comfort her husband during his imprisonment. 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

 
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Blomfield

Eldest son of Robert Blomfield. Of Little Stonham, Suffolk.

He died sometime after the death of William Brown. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

 
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Edward Golding

Under-sheriff. Of Little Stonham, Suffolk.

Robert Blomfield met with Edward Golding the under-sheriff to discuss William Brown's sermon. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

Golding and Blomfield examined several men of the town of Stonham about Brown's sermon. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

 
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Edward Grew

Priest. Of Broke, Norfolk.

Edward Grew fled from his home town to avoid persecution. 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

He was eventually caught and taken to Colchester Castle, where he remained until Elizabeth's accession. 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

 
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Elizabeth Young

Of unknown status. From Emden.

Elizabeth Young gave a book called 'Antichrist' to Thomas Green. 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

She was examined thirteen times, although Foxe only had accounts of nine of them. 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

Her first examination took place before Hussey. 1570, pp. 2268-69, 1576, pp. 1958-59, 1583, pp. 2065-66.

Her second examination was before Dr Martin. 1570, p. 2269, 1576, p. 1959, 1583, p. 2066.

Her third examination took place before Martin. 1570, pp. 2269-70, 1576, p. 1959, 1583, p. 2066.

Her fourth examination was before Bonner, Roger Cholmley, Cooke, Dr Roper of Kent, and Dr Martin. 1570, pp. 2270-71, 1576, pp. 1959-60, 1583, pp. 2066-67.

Young said that Scory had taught her doctrine. 1570, p. 2271, 1576, p. 1960, 1583, p. 2067.

Her fifth examination was before Bonner's chancellor, Darbyshire. 1570, pp. 2271-72, 1576, pp. 1960-61, 1583, pp. 2067-68.

Her sixth examination took place before Bonner's chancellor, Darbyshire. 1570, p. 2272, 1576, pp. 1961-62, 1583, pp. 2068-69.

Her seventh examination was before Darbyshire and the bishop's scribe. 1570, p. 2273, 1576, p. 1962, 1583, p. 2069.

Her eighth examination was before Bonner, the dean (of St Paul's)and Story. 1570, pp. 2273-74, 1576, pp. 1962-63, 1583, pp. 2069-70.

Her ninth examination took place before the dean. 1570, p. 2274, 1576, p. 1963, 1583, p. 2070.

Two women stood surety for Elizabeth Young. 1570, p. 2274, 1576, p. 1963, 1583, p. 2070.

 
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John Story

(1510? - 1571)

1st Regius Professor of Civil Law. Roman catholic martyr. (DNB)

John Story was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

In the 1563 edition, Foxe claims that Story urged that Elizabeth be executed, maintaining that it was pointless to cut the branches off a tree and not strike at its roots (1563, p. 1004). These passages were never reprinted.

In a letter to Augustine Bernher, Bradford asked him to discover what Master G. had said to Doctor Story and others. 1570, p. 1837, 1576, p. 1572, 1583, p. 1654.

Dr Story was said by Dr Martin to have been the chief procurer of the deaths of John Warren, his wife and daughter, although he was a relative of theirs. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

When John Denley sang a psalm at his burning, Story rebuked him for it. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1686.

John Story is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

The first examination of John Philpot was by Cholmley, Master Roper and John Story and one of the scribes of the Arches at Newgate Hall on 2 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89 , 1583, pp. 1795-96.

In Philpot's first examination, Story claimed that Philpot was guilty of heresy for speaking against the mass. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

Philpot's second examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story and Cook and the scribe on 24 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

During Philpot's second examination, Story demanded that Philpot be taken to Lollard's Tower, after which he was imprisoned in Bonner's coal house. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

Story was one of the commissioners who sent John Went, John Tudson, Thomas Brown and Joan Warren to be examined and imprisoned. 1563, p. 1453, 1570, p. 2016, 1576, p. 1737, 1583, p. 1845.

A complaint about John Tudson was sent to Story. 1563, p. 1467, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1749, 1583, p. 1857.

Cranmer was examined by Brookes, Martin and Story. 1563, pp. 1479-83, 1570, pp. 2046-47, 1576, pp. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

A new commission was sent to Rome for the restoration of the pope's authority to allow the condemnation of Cranmer. Those sent were: James Brookes, Martyn and Story . 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Story's oration against Cranmer. 1576, pp. 1769-70, 1583, pp. 1875-76.

Story said that they were true witnesses, as they swore allegience to the pope. Cranmer was was sent to Gloucester by Story. 1570, p. 2056, 1576, p. 1773, 1583, p. 1879.

Henry Adlington received a letter from John Careless, which referred to Story. 1570, pp. 2110-12, 1576, pp. 1833-34, 1583, pp. 1928-29.

Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 1980.

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Ralph Allerton was examined on 24 April 1557 before Bonner, Lord North, Dr Story and others. 1563, p. 1621, 1570, p. 2210-11, 1576, p. 1907-08, 1583, p. 2015-16.

A chaplain asked Thomas Green to repeat the articles of his faith before Story. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2061.

Story questioned Green on the mass and the church fathers. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Green appeared again before Story. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Story commanded Green be whipped 100 times, although this was objected to, at which point Story said he would have Green's tongue cut out if he could. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2062.

Elizabeth Young's eighth examination was before Bonner, the dean of St Paul's and Story. 1570, pp. 2273-74, 1576, pp. 1962-63, 1583, pp. 2069-70.

Alexander Wimshurst was carried before Story and Cook who asked him where his whore was. Wimshurst defended his wife's honour and her whereabouts. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Edward Benet asked Story to help him out of prison, which he did, only to deliver him to Cluney who put him in stocks in the coalhouse for a week. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Richard Waterson was examined by Story, when he was told that £40 would release him from punishment. This was reduced to £10 but eventually a warrant was made to Richard Grafton who was forced to watch the beating of Gye upon a cross at Bridewell. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

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John Story had accused Angel's wife of murdering a woman and her child who resided with her in her house. He sent her to Newgate. Sir Roger Cholmley dismissed the charges against her. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2010.

At Elizabeth's accession Story was committed to ward but he managed to escape overseas, where he met with the duke of Alva in Antwerp. 1583, p. 2153.

Parker, a merchant, was sent to apprehend Story and return him to England. 1583, p. 2153.

Parker told Story that a ship had come from England and that he might like to peruse the merchandise on board. Story suspected nothing, was caught and returned to England. 1583, p. 2153.

In prison, Story refused to agree to the act of supremacy and was subsequently hung, drawn and quartered as a traitor. 1583, p. 2153.

Foxe refers to his death. 1563, p. 1706.

 
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John Trapne

Of Little Stonham, Suffolk.

John Trapne was forced to flee his hometown for fear of persecution. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

 
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Mrs Blomfield

Of Little Stonham, Suffolk.

Mrs Blomfield died sometime after the death of William Brown. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

[Wife of Robert Blomfield.]

 
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Robert Blomfield

Constable of Little Stonham, Suffolk. Bailiff to Sir John Jerningham.

Robert Blomfield met with Edward Golding the under-sheriff to discuss William Brown's sermon. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

Golding and Blomfield examined certain men of the town about Brown's sermon. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

Brown was taken at night and should have been taken before the council the following day, but Blomfield fell sick and could not take him. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

After Brown's death, Blomfield's son became sick, as did his wife who later died. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

Blomfield then remarried a rich widow but he became very sick and died. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

When Blomfield died he was ninescore pounds in debt. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

Shortly before he died Blomfield threatened a man named Simon Harlston. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

 
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Robert Boele

Of Little Stonham, Suffolk.

Robert Boele was forced to flee his hometown for fear of persecution. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

 
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Sir John Jerningham

(d. 1598)

Of Belton, Suffolk. Suffolk JP. [See Diarmaid MacCulloch, Suffolk and the Tudors: Politics and Religion in an English County 1500-1600, pp. 195, 197, 206 n. 212-14, 252-3, 260.]

Robert Blomefield, the constable of the town and bailiff to Sir John Jerningham, met with Edward Golding the under-sheriff to discuss Brown's sermon. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

[Uncle to John Jerningham of Somerleyton (d. 1587). From a different cadet branch of the Jerningham family to Henry Jerningham. See Diarmaid MacCulloch, Suffolk and the Tudors: Politics and Religion in an English County 1500-1600, pp. 96, 252.]

 
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Sir Thomas Cornwallis

(1518/19 - 1604)

MP [1547, 1553, 1554, 1558], Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk (1552 - 1530, Comptroller of the Royal Household (1557 - 1558). (DNB; Bindoff

On 15 April 1555, Cornwallis was ordered by the Privy Council to interrogate William Flower and also to have Bishop Bonner and the Middlesex JPs initiate both religious and secular proceedings against William Flower. 1583, p. 1561.

Sentence against six martyred at Brentford was read by Darbyshire in the presence of Sir Edward Hastings and Sir Thomas Cornwallis. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2241, 1576, p. 1935, 1583, p. 2039.

The sheriff, Sir Thomas Cornwallis, made a bill against William Brown. 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

After Wyatt's rebellion, he went to see Elizabeth at Ashridge and found her to be unwell. 1563, p. 1711, 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

Foxe refers to his repair to London out of Essex with Clinton and others. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

[A recusant in Elizabeth's reign (Bindoff).]

 
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Thomas Green

Apprentice to the catholic printer John Wayland (fl. 1539 - 1570). [See E. G. Duff, A Century of the English Book Trade: Short Notices of All Printers, Stationers, Book-binders, and Others Connected with it from the Issue of the First Dated Book in 1457 to the Incorporation of the Company of Stationers in 1557 (London, 1948), pp. 167-68.]

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Thomas Green was brought before Dr Story by his master, John Wayland the printer, for a book called 'Antichrist' and so examined. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2262, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

Green said he got the book from a Frenchman. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2262, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

He was transferred quickly from Lollard's Tower to the coalhouse by Cluney. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

Green was put in the stocks. 1563, p. 1686, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

He was examined again by Story. 1563, p. 1686, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

He was examined again and sent to prison for 14 days. 1563, p. 1686, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

The lord of Windsor's chaplain and others spoke gently to Green, urging him to say who gave him the book. 1563, p. 1687, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

The chaplain asked Green to repeat the articles of his faith before Story. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2061.

Story questioned Green on the mass and the church fathers. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Cluney removed Green to prison again, first to the coalhouse and then the salthouse. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Green was removed from the salthouse to Lollard's Tower, where he met with Lion, a Frenchman, who sang psalms in French and put the jailor into a rage. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

John Story commanded Thomas Green be brought to Walbrook before the commissioners. He was eventually sent before Hussey. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Thomas Green told Hussey that John Bean, an apprentice to Tottle, had received a copy of the said book from him. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Cluney delivered Green to Trinian, the porter of Christ's hospital, where he was thrown into the dungeon. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Green appeared again before Story. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Green was whipped by two beadles. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Nicholas Priestman, one of Green's friends, gave rods for Green to be whipped with. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2062.

Story commanded he be whipped 100 times, although this was objected to, at which point Story said he would have Green's tongue cut out if he could. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2062.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Brown

(d. 1558)

Parson of little Stonham (alias Stanham Jerningham), Suffolk

William Brown made a sermon in his home town after the death of Edward VI. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

Robert Blomfield, the constable of the town and bailiff to Sir John Jerningham, met with Edward Golding the under-sheriff to discuss Brown's sermon. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

Golding and Blomfield examined certain men of the town about Brown's sermon. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

The sheriff, Sir Thomas Cornwallis, made a bill against William Brown. 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

Brown was taken at night and should have been taken before the council the following day, but Blomfield fell sick and could not take him. 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

Brown was sent to Bury St Edmunds prison and then to the Fleet. 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

Brown was released and returned to his home town but would not attend mass, so he and his wife had to flee their home town. 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

Brown died in the last year of Mary's reign. 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Broke
Broke
NGR:

Unidentified

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Bury St. Edmunds
Berry, Burie, Bury, Burye, S. Edmondsbury, Saint Edmundes Bury, Sainte Edmundes Burye, S. Edmunds Bury, S. Edmundsbury
NGR: TL 853 649

A borough and market town, having exclusive jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Thingoe, county of Suffolk. 26.5 miles north-west by north from Ipswich. The monastery at the dissolution was worth £2336 16s. per annum. Bury comprises the parishes of St. Mary and St. James. The living of each is a donative in the patronage of the mayor and corporation.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Colchester
Colchester, Colchestre
NGR: TM 000 250

A borough, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the Colchester division of the hundred of Lexden, county of Essex. 22 miles north-east by east from Chelmsford. The town comprises the parishes of All Saints, St. James, St. Martin, St. Mary at the Walls, St. Nicholas, St. Peter, St. Rumwald and Holy Trinity within the walls; and St. Botolph, St. Giles, St. Leonard and St. Mary Magdalene without the walls; all in the archdeaconry of Colchester and Diocese of London

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Ipswich
Ipswich, Ipswiche
NGR: TM 170 440

A borough in the liberty of Ipswich, county of Suffolk. 25 miles south-east by east from Bury St. Edmunds, 69 miles north-east from London. The borough comprises the parishes of St. Clement, St. Helen, St. Lawrence, St. Margaret, St. Mary at Elms, St. Mary at the Quay, St. Mary Stoke, St. Mary at the Tower, St. Mathew, St. Nicholas, St. Peter, St. Stephen, Witham with Thurlstone, and part of Westerfield; all within the Archdeaconry of Suffolk and Diocese of Norwich. St. Clement with St. Helen is a rectory in charge; St. Mary Stoke is a rectory; St. Mathew and St. Stephen are discharged rectories; St. Lawrence, St. Margaret, St. Mary at Elms, St. Mary at Quay, St. Mary at the Tower, St. Nicholas and St. Peter are perpetual curacies

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Little Stonham
Litell Stanham, Litell Stonhum, Little Stanham, Stanham Ierningham
NGR: TM 115 600

Not identified, suggest:

Little Stonham (Stonham Parva): TM 115 600

A parish in the hundred of Bosmere and Claydon, county of Suffolk. 4 miles north-north-east from Needham Market. The living is a discharged rectory in the Archdeaconry of Suffolk and Diocese of Norwich.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2089 [2065]

Queene Mary. Diuers deliuered by Gods prouidence. Elizabeth Yong examined.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.Paule sayth: MarginaliaHeb. 9.With one offering hath he made perfecte for euer them that are sanctified.

Chaunc. With vaine glory you reherse much Scripture, as al the sort of you do: but you haue no more vnderstanding then a many of sheepe. But to the purpose. Will you that your neighbors shall enter into bōds for you, or not?

MarginaliaLithall refuseth to put in bonde.Lith. By my minde they shall not. Wherfore I desire you that you would not binde me, but let me serue God with my conscience freely. For it is wrytten: MarginaliaApoc. 13.They that leade into captiuitie shall goe into captiuitie, and they that strike wyth the sworde, shall pearish with the sworde.

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Also it is wrytten in the Gospel of our Sauiour Iesus Christ: MarginaliaMath. 18.that who so doeth offend one of these little ones whych beleeue in mee, it were better for him that a milstone were hanged about his necke, and that he were cast into the depth of the sea. Of the which I am assured by his holye spirite that I am one. Wherefore be you well assured that such mercy as you shew, vnto you shall be shewed the like.

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Chaunc. You are a mad man. I would not binde you, but that I must needes haue somewhat to shewe for your deliueraunce. Then he called ij of my neighbours, Thomas Daniel and Saunders Maybe, which offered themselues to be bounde, and called me before them, and sayd: I haue a letter of his own hand wryting with his name and seale at it, with a booke also againste the Regiment of women, for the which I coulde make him to be hanged, drawen, & quartered, but on my faith I will him no more hurt, then I meane to mine owne soule.

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Lith. I desire you that be my neighbours and frends, that you wil not enter into bondes for me: for you knowe not the danger therof, neither I my selfe: It goeth against my conscience that ye should so doe.

Chaunc. Why I wil not binde you to do any thing against your conscience.

MarginaliaHis neighbours enter into bonde for him.Neighbours. Then they made the bonde and sealed to it, and willed me þt I shoulde seale to it also: and I saide that I would not, neither could I obserue the bond, and therfore I would not set too my hand.

Chaunc. It is pitie that thou hast so much fauour shewed thee: yet for these honest mens sake I wil discharge thee.

Notwithstanding all these dissembling woords of maister Darbishire, pretending for fauoure of his sureties to set him at libertye, it was no suche thing, nor anye zeale of charitie þt mooued him so to do, but onely feare of the time, vnderstanding the daungerous and vnrecouerable sicknesse of Queene Mary, which then began somwhat to asswage the cruel proceedings of these persecutors, wherby they durst not do that they would: for els Lithall was not like to haue escaped so easily. 

Commentary  *  Close

A list of people troubled, harrassed and driven from their homes appears here in the 1563 edition (pp. 1677-79). This list was not reprinted in subsequent editions, almost certainly because it contained the names of a number of radical protestants, especially freewillers. By including these names Foxe legitimated them as confessors and even martyrs. Of course many of the names in the list were of people who were perfectly orthodox by Foxe's standards. But it was easier to discard both the wheat and the tares rather then to sort them out.

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Edward Grew.

MOreouer, there was one MarginaliaEdward Grew, and Appline his wyfe.Edward Grewe priest, and Appline his wife, compelled to flie from theyr dwelling at a Towne called Broke:  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 535, fn 1

This must have been Broke in Norfolk, as this case is placed under "the persecuted in Norfolk," in p. 1678, Edit. 1563.

and the man being verye aged, trauailed abroade to keepe a good conscience.

At the last he was taken and laid in Colchester Castle, where he remained till Quene Elizabeth came to her regal seat, and by the alteration of Religion he was deliuered. His wife, good womā, was in great care for him, and to her power did what she could to succour him.

William Browne.

MarginaliaM. Browne of Suffolke.WIlliam Browne, Parson of Little Stanham, in the Countie of Suffolke, made a Sermon in the sayde Towne, incontinently  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 535, line 23

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'incontinently' to 'continently' in the text.} "Continently" in this passage, is adopted from the first Edition, p. 1676, instead of "incontinently" and "immediately," the readings of the later editions.
This word, though not appearing in any of the old English Dictionaries, may be supported from a passage in "Newes concernynge the general councell holden at Trydent ... translated oute of Germayne into English by Ihon Holibush, an. 1548," printed by Thos. Raynald, and extracted in Brydges' British Bibliographer, ii. 294: - "Whan the Turkyshe messaungers had receaved thys coragious answere of the emperiall majesty, they are returned to theyr Lorde, which continently sente over the foresayde letters," &c. Also in Sir Thomas More's Works, page 1180; "The second booke of Comfort against Tribulation," ch. xi. we read, "And then continently following, to thentent that we should compasse us about uppon everye syde, he sheweth in what wyse wee be by the dyvel envyroned," &c. A double example of "continent" occurs in H. Machyn's Diary (Camden Society, 1848): "The xxiiij. day of May [1554] ... Sant Pulcurs parryche went a-bowt their owne parryche and in Smythfeld; as they wher goohyng, ther cam a man unto the prest [that bare] the sacrament, and began to pluke ytt owt of ys hand, and contenent he drew ys dagger, and contenent he was taken and cared to Nuwgate."

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after the buriall of our good King Edward, and in his sermon he sayde: there goeth a report that our good king is buried with a Masse by the Bishop of Winchester, he hauing a miter vpon his head. But if it were so (sayeth hee) they are all traitours that so doe, because it is bothe againste the truthe and the lawes of thys realme, and it is greate Idolatrie and blasphemie, and against the glory of God: and they are no frends neither to God, the king, nor yet vnto the realm that so do. For this his preaching, one MarginaliaRobert Blomefield, persecutor.Robert Blomefielde, and aduersarye to the truth, being then constable of the sayd towne, and bailiffe vnto sir Iohn Ierningham knight (the chiefe lord of þt towne) immediatly rode foorth, & brought home wt him one MarginaliaEdward Goulding vnder Shrieffe. MarginaliaSyr Thomas Cornwalis high Shrieffe.Edward Goulding, which was then vnder sheriffe, Syr Thomas Cornewalis being then high sheriffe. 
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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 535, line 16 from the bottom

Sir Thomas Cornwallis was high sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk in 1553-4, the last year of Edward VI. He raised a considerable force in defence of Mary's claim, and was by her, in gratitude, made a member of the privy council, treasurer of Calais, and comptroller of the household.

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So the sayd Golding and Blomfield sent for certaine men of the sayd Towne, and examined them for the Sermon. Wherunto they made but a small answer. Then the Sheriffe made a Bill, and so feared the men, that 2. or 3. of them set to their hands, and one of them neuer ioyed after but it was a griefe to him till he died.

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Then did they take men with them vnto the Parsones

house, and in the night MarginaliaM. Browne persecuted and taken.they tooke him, and wyth watchmē kept him vntill it was day. Then should he haue bene caried the next day to the Counsell: but þe said Rob. Blomefield was taken so sicke, that hee was like to die: so that he could not carie him for his life.

Then the sayd sheriffe sent him to Ipswich againe, and there he was for a time. Then hee was sent to Burie prison, & from thence to the Councel, and then into the Flete: and so he lay in prisone from the beginning of haruest till it was nigh Christmasse, and he sayd God gaue him suche answeres to make when he was examined, MarginaliaM. Browne deliuered.that hee was deliuered with quietnes of conscience. And hauing his libertie, he came againe vnto the foresayd Towne: and because he would not goe to Masse, his liuing was taken away, and he & his wife were constrained to flie heere and there, for his life & conscience. In the last yeare of Queene Maries raigne, God did take him out of this life in peace.

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Where moreouer is to be noted, þt this Robert Blomfield aboue named, immediately after he had apprehended the saide Browne fell very sicke: And though at that time he was a welthy man and of a great substance (beside his land, which was better then twentie pound a yeare) after thys time, MarginaliaExample of Gods punishment, vpon a parsecutor.God so plagued his housholde, that hys eldest sonne died, and his wife had a pining sickenesse till she departed this life also.

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Then maried he an other, a richer widow: but all wold not helpe, and nothing would prosper: For hee had a sore pining sicknesse, being full of botches and sores, whereby he wasted away both body and goodes, till he died.

So when he died, he was aboue ix. score pounds in det, and it was neuer heard of any repentaunce he had. But a litle before his death, he bragged, & threatned a good man, one Symon Harlston, 

Commentary  *  Close

Simon Harlstone, whose name appears several times in Foxe's book, was Archbishop Matthew Parker's brother-in-law. Although he prudently does not labour the point, Foxe must have enjoyed recording Harlstone's opposition to wearing the surplice which the archbishop insisted all clerics had to wear.

to putte him foorth to the Officers, because he did weare no Surplis when he sayd seruice.

Wherefore it is pitie suche baites of Poperie are lefte to the enemies to take Christians in. God take them away, or els from them: for God knoweth they be the cause of much blindnesse and strife amongest men.

Furthermore, out of the sayde Towne were constrayned to flye Robert Boele  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 536, middle

The first Edition, p. 1677, reads "Beell," the rest "Boele."

and Iohn Trapne, because they woulde not goe to Masse and receiue their Sacrament of the aultare.

Elizabeth Young.

YE heard before in the treatise of the scourging of Thomas Grene, how he was troubled and beaten by doctour Storie, for a certaine booke called Antichriste, 

Commentary  *  Close

The book is almost certainly John Olde's translation of Rudolph Gualter's Antichrist (STC 25009), printed in Emden in 1556.

which he receiued of a woman, because in no case he woulde detect her.  
Commentary  *  Close

See 1563, p. 1687; 1570, p. 2263; 1576, p. 1954; 1583, p. 2067.

This woman was one Elizabeth Young, who comming from Emden to England, brought with her diuers bookes, and sparsed them abroad in London, for the which shee being at length espied and laied fast, 

Commentary  *  Close

In 1556.

was broughte to examination 13. times before the Catholicke Inquisitours of heretical prauitie. Of the which her examinations, nine haue come to our handes.

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Wherein how fiercely she was assaulted, how shamefully shee was reuiled, how miserably handled, and what answeres she made vnto the aduersaries in her owne defence, and finally after all this, how she escaped and passed through þe pikes (being yet, as I heare say, aliue) I thought to geue the reader here to see and vnderstande.

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The first examination of Elizabeth Young, before maister Hussie.

MarginaliaThe first examination of Elizabeth Yoūg.WHo examined her of many thinges: First where she was borne, and who was her father and mother.

Elizabeth Young. Syr, all this is but vaine talke, and very superfluous. It is to fil my head with fantasies, that I shoulde not be able to aunswere vnto suche thinges as I came for. Ye haue not (I thinke) put me in prison to know who is my father and mother. But I pray you goe to the matter that I came hether for.

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M. Hussie. Wherfore wentest thou out of the realme?

Elizabeth. To keepe my conscience cleane.

Hussie. When wast thou at Masse?

Eliz. Not this three yeares.

Hussie. Then was thou not there iij. yeares before that.

Eliz. No Syr, nor yet iij. yeares more before that, for and if I were, I had euill lucke.

Hussie. How old art thou?

Eliz. Fourty and vpwardes.

Hussie. Twentie of those yeares thou wentest to Masse.

Eliz. Yea, and twentie more I may and yet come home as wise as I went thether first, for I vnderstand it not.

Hussie. Why wilt not thou go to the Masse?

Eliz.
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