Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt References
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Roger Cholmley

(d. 1565)

Lord chief justice of King's and Queen's Bench (1552 - 1553), privy councillor (under Mary) and MP [Bindoff, Commons; Hasler, Commons; DNB]. Judge, lieutenant of the Tower. Son of Sir Richard Cholmley [DNB]

Sir Roger Cholmley persuaded the royal guard to support Northumberland against Mary (1570, p. 1568; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, p. 1407).

He was sent to the Tower, with Sir Edward Montagu, on 27 July 1553 (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1465).

He was released from the Tower together with Sir Edward Montagu on 7 September 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

Sir Roger Cholmley was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Cholmley participated in a debate/dinner conversation between Nicholas Ridley and John Feckenham and Sir John Bourne, on the nature of the eucharist, held while Ridley was a prisoner in the Tower (1563, p. 931; 1570, p. 1591; 1576, pp. 1357-58; and 1583, p. 1428).

Cholmley came to William Flower at the stake and urged Flower, on pain of damnation, to recant his heretical beliefs. 1563, p. 1733; 1570, p. 1749; 1576, p. 1493; 1583, p. 1577.

George Tankerfield was sent into Newgate by Roger Cholmey and Dr Martin. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

Philpot's first examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story, and one of the scribes of the Arches at Newgate Hall, 2 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

Cholmley was one of the commissioners who sent John Went, John Tudson, Thomas Brown and Joan Warren to be examined and imprisoned. 1563, p. 1453, 1570, p. 2016, 1576, p. 1737, 1583, p. 1845.

A complaint about John Tudson was made to Cholmley. 1563, p. 1467, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1749, 1583, p. 1857. [Foxe erroneously calls him 'Sir Richard Cholmley'.]

Cuthbert Symson was brought before Cholmley, examined and racked. 1563, p. 1651, 1570, p. 2229, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2032.

Cholmley sent to Newgate 27 prisoners who were members of an illegal conventicle in Islington. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

Thomas Hinshaw was taken by the constables of Islington to appear before Master Cholmley, who sent him to Newgate. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Robert Farrer, haberdasher of London, had two daughters, one of whom was delivered to Sir Roger Cholmley for a sum of money, to be at his commandment, the other sold to Sir William Godolphin, who took her to Boulogne as his lackey, dressed in men's clothing. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2294.

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The lord mayor of London and Chomley examined Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax. 1563, p. 1683, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

Elizabeth Young's fourth examination was before Bonner, Roger Cholmley, Cooke, Dr Roper of Kent, and Dr Martin. 1570, pp. 2270-71, 1576, pp. 1959-60, 1583, pp. 2066-67.

Tingle was a prisoner in Newgate. His keeper realised that Edward Benet had a New Testament and sent him to Cholmley, who imprisoned him in the Compter for 25 weeks. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Benet was apprehended again in Islington and sent before Cholmley but was cut off from the rest. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

John Story had accused Angel's wife of murdering a woman and her child who resided with her in her house. He sent her to Newgate. Sir Roger Cholmley dismissed the charges against her. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2010.

[Also referred to as 'Lorde Chiefe Baron' or 'Chomley']

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Martin

(d. 1597?)

Of Winterbourne St Martin, Dorset; Steeple Morden, Cambridge and London. DCL (1555), LLD (1587). MP Saltash (1553), Hindon (1554 and 1555), Ludgershall (1558). Chancellor to Stephen Gardiner by 1554. Commr. Visit Oxford University (1555), collect surveys and acct. religious houses (1556), heresy (1557), heretical books (1557). [Bindoff]

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Thomas Martin was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Thomas Martin searched John Hooper's room in the Fleet. 1563, p. 1056; 1570, pp. 1679-80; 1576, p. 1433; 1583, p. 1507.

George Tankerfield was sent into Newgate by Roger Cholmey and Dr Martin. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

Cranmer was examined by Brookes, Martin and Story. 1563, pp. 1479-83, 1570, pp. 2046-47, 1576, p. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

A new commission was sent to Rome for the restoration of the pope's authority to allow the condemnation of Cranmer. Those sent were: James Brookes, Martyn and Story . 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Foxe records Martyn's oration against Cranmer. 1570, pp. 2049-50, 1576, pp. 1767-68, 1583, p. 1874.

A talk took place between Cranmer and Martyn while Cranmer was in prison. 1576, pp. 1770-71, 1583, pp. 1876-77.

Martyn had demanded to know who Cranmer thought was supreme head of the church of England. 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1775, 1583, p. 1881.

John Careless' first examination was before Dr Martin, marshall of the King's Bench [Sir William Fitzwilliam - DNB + Hasler / Bindoff], Dr Martin's scribe and an unspecified priest in the lord chancellor's house. 1563, pp. 1529-35, 1570, pp. 2101-02, 1576, pp. 1813-14, 1583, pp. 1919-20.

Elizabeth Young's second examination was before Dr Martin. 1570, p. 2269, 1576, p. 1959, 1583, p. 2066.

Her third examination took place before Martin. 1570, pp. 2269-70, 1576, p. 1959, 1583, p. 2066.

Her fourth examination was before Bonner, Roger Cholmley, Cooke, Dr Roper of Kent, and Dr Martin. 1570, pp. 2270-71, 1576, pp. 1959-60, 1583, pp. 2066-67.

When Alexander Wimshurst arrived at St Paul's, he saw Chedsey, his old acquaintance at Oxford, and said to him that he would rather be examined by Martin than by anyone else. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Robert Horneby was delivered from condemnation by Dr Martin. 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2082.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Cooke

DD (1537). Fellow of All Souls (1527 - 1535) (Foster). Prebend of Kilsby (Lincoln) (1554 - 1559). Deprived after September 1559 (Fasti).

William Cooke was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries. The letter was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

Philpot's second examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story and Cook and the scribe on 24 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

Dr Cook took part in the examination of William Tyms, Robert Drakes, Thomas Spurge, Richard Spurge, John Cavel and George Ambrose. 1570, pp. 2076-77, 1576, p. 1791, 1583, pp. 1896-97.

John Jackson was examined by Dr Cook 11 March 1556. Foxe records his questions and answers. 1563, pp. 1611-12, 1570, p. 2134, 1576, p. 1856, 1583, p. 1950.

Thomas Moore denied transubstantiation when examined by Dr Cook and so was condemned. 1570, p. 2134, 1576, pp. 1855-56, 1583, p. 1949.

Richard Woodman's first examination before Christopherson, Story, Cooke and others took place on 14 April 1557. 1563, pp. 1573-79, 1570, p. 2174-78, 1576, pp. 1877-81, 1583, pp. 1986-89.

Elizabeth Young's fourth examination was before Bonner, Roger Cholmley, Cooke, Dr Roper of Kent, and Dr Martin. 1570, pp. 2270-71, 1576, pp. 1959-60, 1583, pp. 2066-67.

Alexander Wimshurst was carried before Story and Cook who asked him where his whore was. Wimshurst defended his wife's honour and her whereabouts. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Roper

(1495/96 - 1578)

Of Lynsted. JP, MP (1529, 1545, 1547, 1553, 1554, 1555, 1558). Sheriff of Kent (1554 - 1555). Son-in-law to Sir Thomas More and author of a celebrated biographical sketch of More (DNB; Bindoff).

William Roper was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Roper was originally included in the Commission of the Peace for Middlesex in 1555, but his name was deleted. [SP11/5, no. 6]

On 1 April 1555, the Privy Council ordered Roper to arrest Thomas Woodgate and William Maynarde for clandestine preaching. 1583, p. 1561.

On 7 April Roper was ordered to arrest a man from Harwich, who went about with a boy, preaching from place to place. 1583, p. 1561. [NB: Foxe is mistaken in saying that the order was to arrest one Harwich; see APC V, p. 110].

After Master Roper of Lynsted talked with the judges, it was decided that John Bland should be returned to Maidstone until the Greenwich sessions of 18-19 February. 1563, p. 1223, 1570, p. 1847, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, p. 1668.

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries. It was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

Roper escorted John Wade to his burning in July 1555. 1576, p. 1600, 1583, pp. 1679-80.

Philpot's first examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story, and one of the scribes of the Arches at Newgate Hall, 2 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

Philpot's second examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story and Cook and the scribe on 24 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

[In a letter that was never delivered] Green told Philpot of his presentment on 17 November before Bonner and two bishops, Master Dean, Roper, Welch, John Harpsfield, and two or three others. Dr Dale, Master George Mordant and Master Dee [not listed here as Dr] were also there. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

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Roper took part in the examination of several prisoners in Colchester on 19 October 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

The sixth and last examination of Richard Woodman took place before Chichester, William Roper, Nicholas Harpsfield, the fat priest, Winchester and others. 1563, 1599-1601, 1570, p. 2192-94, 1576, p. 1892-93, 1583, pp. 2000-02.

Elizabeth Young's fourth examination was before Bonner, Roger Cholmley, Cooke, Dr Roper of Kent, and Dr Martin. 1570, pp. 2270-71, 1576, pp. 1959-60, 1583, pp. 2066-67.

2090 [2066]

Queene Mary. Diuers deliuered by Gods prouidence. Elizabeth Yong examined.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.Elizabeth. MarginaliaElizabeth Young refuseth to go to masse.Syr, my conscience will not suffer me: For I had rather that all the world should accuse me, then mine owne conscience.

Hussy. What and if a louse or a flea sticke vpon thy skinne, and bite thy flesh? thou must make a conscience in the taking her off: is there not a conscience in it?

Elizabeth. That is but an easie Argument to displace the Scriptures, and especially in such a part as my saluation dependeth vppon: for it is but an easie conscience þt a man can make.

Hussy. But why wilte thou not sweare vpon the Euangelist before a Iudge?

MarginaliaElizabeth Young denyeth to sweare and why.Eliz. Because I know not what a booke oth is.

Hussy. Then he began to teach her the booke oth.

Eliz. Syr, I do not vnderstand it, and therefore I wil not learne it.

Hussy. Then sayde hee: thou wilt not vnderstand it: and with that rose vp and went his way.

Her second examination before Doctour Martin.

MarginaliaThe 2. examination of Elizabeth Yoūg.WHo sayd to her: Woman, thou art come from beyōd the sea, and hast brought with thee bookes of heresie and treason, MarginaliaElizabeth Young for bringing ouer bookes.and thou must confesse to vs, who translated them, Printed them, and who sent them ouer (for once I knowe thee to be but a messenger:) and in so doynge the Queenes highnesse will be good to thee (for shee hath forgeuen greater things then this) & thou shalt find as much fauour as is possible. But if thou be stubborne, and wilte not confesse, thou wilt be wondrous euill handled: for we know the truth already, but thus we do, only to see whether thou wilt be true of thy woord, or no.

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Eliz. Syr, ye haue my confession, and more then that I can not say.

Martin. Thou must say more, and shalt say more. Doest thou thinke that we wil be full answeared by this examination that thou hast made? Thou rebell whoore and traitorly heretike, thou dost refuse to sweare vpon the Euangelist before a Iudge, I heare say. MarginaliaD. Martyn threatneth her with the racke.Thou shalt be racked inchmeale, thou traitourly whoore and hereticke, but thou shalt sweare afore a Iudge before thou goe: yea, and thou shalt be made to confesse how many bookes thou hast sold, and to whom.

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Eliz. Syr I vnderstand not what an oth is, and therfore I will take no suche thing vppon me. And no man hathe boughte any bookes of mee as yet, for those bookes that I had, you Commissioners haue them all.

Martin. Thou traitorly whore, we knowe that thou haste sold a number of bookes, yea, and to whom: and how many times thou hast beene here, and where thou layest, and euery place thou hast bene in. Doest thou thinke that thou hast fooles in hand?

Eliz. No syr, you be too wise for me: for I can not tel howe manye places I haue beene in my selfe: but if I were in Turkey, I should haue meate and drinke and lodging for my money.

Mart. Thou rebel whoore, MarginaliaElizabeth Young charged for speaking agaynst the Queene.thou hast spoken euil woordes by the Queene, and thou dwellest amongest a sort of traitours and rebelles, that can not geue the Queene a good woorde.

Eliz. I am not able to accuse any man thereof, nor yet is there any man that can approoue anye such things by me, as ye lay vnto my charge. For I know by Gods woorde, & Gods booke hath taught me what is my duetie to God, and vnto my Queene, and therefore (as I sayd) I am assured that no man liuing vpon the earth, can approoue any such things by me.

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Mart. Thou rebell and traitourly whoore, thou shalt be so racked & handled, that thou shalt be an example to all such traitorly whoores and heretikes: And thou shalt be made to sweare by the holye Euangelist, and confesse to whome thou haste solde al and euery of these hereticall bookes that thou haste solde: for wee knowe what number thou hast solde, and to whome: but thou shalt be made to confesse it in spite of thy bloud.

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Eli2. Here is my carkas: do with it what ye wil, and more then that ye can not haue. Master Martin, ye can haue no more but my bloude.

Then fared he  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 538, line 9

"To take on" or "behave" seems to be the meaning of this word in this passage. Tyndale in his answer to Sir Thomas More's Dialogue, book iii. ch. xiii. uses it in the same way: "In the 13th he rageth, and fareth exceeding foul with himself." Works, Edit. 1831, vol. ii. p. 157. See Prompt. Parv. p. 150. Sir Thomas himself in the "Debellacion of Salem and Byzance," pt. i. ch. xii. "He fareth in all thys tale, as though we sate together playing at poste." And so Foxe, vol. iii. 349, line 12; and again vol. iv. p. 40, line 12 from the bottom, "he, staring and faring like a madman."

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as though hee had bene starke mad, and sayd: Martin? Why callest thou me Martin?

Eliz. Sir, I knowe you well enough, for I haue bene before you ere now. Ye deliuered me once at Westminster.

Martin. Where diddest thou dwell then?

Eliz. I dwelled in the Minories.

Martin. I deliuered thee and thy husband bothe: and I thoughte then that thou wouldest haue done otherwyse then thou dost now. For if thou hadst bene before any Bi-

shop in England, and said the woordes that thou didst before me, thou haddest fried a fagot: MarginaliaElizabeth Yoūg and her husband deliuered by D. Martyn.and thoughe thou didst not burne then, thou art like to burne or hang now.

Eliz. Syr, I promised you then, that I woulde neuer be fed with an vnknowen tongue, & no more I will not yet.

Martin. I shall feede thee well enoughe. Thou shalte be fedde with that (I warrant thee) which shall be finally to thine ease.

Eliz. Doe what God shall suffer you to doe: for more yee shall not. And then he arose, and so departed, and went to the keepers house, and sayd to the wife: Whom haste thou suffered to come to this vile traitourly whoore and heretike to speake wyth her? Then sayd the keepers wife, as God receiue my soule, here came neither mā, woman, nor childe to aske for her.

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Mart. If any man, woman or childe come to aske for her, I charge thee in paine of death, that they be layed fast, MarginaliaElyzabeth Yoūg commaunded to close prison, to haue one day bread, an other day water.and geue her one day bread, and an other day water.

Eliz. If ye take away my meat, I trust that God wil take away my hunger: and so he departed, and sayde, that was too good for her: and then was shee shutte vppe vnder two lockes in the Clincke, where shee was before.

The third examination before Doctour Martin againe.

MarginaliaThe 3. examination of Elizabeth Young.THen was shee broughte before hym in his Chamber within my Lorde Chauncellours house. Who asked her, saying: Elizabeth, wilt thou confesse these thynges that thou hast bene examined vppon? For thou knowest that I haue bene thy frende: and in so doing, I wil be thy frende againe: geuing her manye faire woordes, and then demaunding of her MarginaliaD. Martyn seeketh to know how many gentlemen were fled ouer the Sea.how many Gentlemen were beyond the Seas.

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Eliz. It is too much for me to tel you how many are on the other side.

Mart. No, I meane but in Franckford & Emden, where thou hast bene.

Eliz. Syr, I did neuer take accounte of them: it is a thing that I looke not for.

Martin. When shall I heare a true woorde come out of thy mouth?

Eliz. I haue tolde you the truth, but because that it soundeth not to your minde, therefore ye will not credite it.

Martin. Wilt thou yet confesse? and if thou wilt, that that I haue promised, I will doe: MarginaliaElizabeth Yoūg againe threatned with the racke.and if thou wilt not, I promise thee thou must goe euen hence to the racke, and therfore confesse.

Eliz. I can say no more then I haue sayde.

Martin. Well, for as muche as shee will confesse no more, haue her awaye to the Racke, and then shee will be marred. Then aunsweared a Priest that sate there, and sayde: Woman, take an othe and confesse. Wilt thou be hurte for other men?

MarginaliaShee agayne refuseth to sweare to accuse other.Eliz. I can confesse no more then I haue. Doe with my carkas what yee will.

Martin. Did yee euer heare the like of thys Heretique? What a stoute heretique is thys? We haue the truthe, and we knowe the truth, and yet looke whether shee will confesse. There is no remedie, but shee muste needes to the Racke, and therefore away with her, and so commaunded her out of the doore, and called her keeper vnto hym, and sayde to him: There is no remedie but this heretike must be racked: and talked with him more, but what it was she heard not.

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Then he called her in againe, and sayde: Wilte thou not confesse, and keepe thee from the Racke? I aduise thee so to doe: for if thou wilt not, thou knowest not the payne yet, but thou shalt do.

Eliz. Syr, I canne confesse no more. Doe with my carkas what yee will.

MarginaliaElizabeth Yoūg commaunded agayne to the Clinke.Martin. Keeper, away with her. Thou knowest what I sayde. Let her knowe the paine of the Racke. And so shee departed, thinking no lesse, but that she should haue gone to the Racke, till shee sawe the keeper tourne towarde the Clincke againe. And thus did God alienate their heattes and diminish their tyrānous power, vnto the time of further examination: for she was brought before the byshop, the Deane, and the Chauncellour, and other Commissioners, first and last thirteene times.

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The fourth examination was before the Byshop of London, Syr Roger Cholmley, Doctour Cooke, the Recorder of London, Doctour Roper of Kent, and Doctour Martin, as concerning her faith. &c.

FIrste, shee being presented by Doctour Martin, before the Bishop of London. Doctour Martin beganne to

declare
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