Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Anne Glover

Wife of John Glover. Of Mancetter, Warwickshire.

Anne Glover was apprehended and taken to Lichfield for examination. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

She was arrested for drinking from the same cup as Joyce Lewes at Lewes' martyrdom. 1563, p. 1636, 1570, p. 2221, 1576, p. 1917, 1583, p. 2024.

Anne Glover was examined by the Marian authorities who were seeking her husband. 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

After his death John Glover was buried in the churchyard but Chancellor Draycot demanded that he be dug up. The priest protested, as Glover had been buried for six weeks and therefore stank, so Draycot insisted that Glover be denounced as damned from the pulpit and then dug up after one year and his bones be thrown over the wall into the highway. This information was given by the parson of the town to Hugh Burrows of Fynden in Derbyshire and to Glover's wife, Agnes, who gave the information to Foxe. 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

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[Foxe also refers to her as Agnes Glover.]

 
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Dabney

Painter. Of London.

Dabney was brought for examination before Bonner by John Avales. 1563, p. 1696, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

He was left alone in Bonner's house during preparations for a procession. The porter mistook him for a free citizen and let him out of the gate. 1563, p. 1696, 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, pp. 2071-72.

Unable to find Dabney, Avales demanded 15 crowns from his wife and eventually left them alone. 1563, p. 1697, 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

 
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John Avales

Described by Foxe as one of Queen Mary's servants. Probably a constable. Of Southwark.

John Lithal was brought for examination by John Avales. 1570, p. 2266, 1576, p. 1957, 1583, p. 2063.

Dabney was brought for examination before Bonner by John Avales. 1563, p. 1696, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

Unable to find Dabney, Avales demanded 15 crowns from his wife and eventually left them alone. 1563, p. 1697, 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Avales searched for a congregation in London and came close to spotting them. 1570, p. 2278, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2074.

He talked with two men in Pudding Lane but was unable to locate the underground congregation in the area. 1570, p. 2278, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2074.

Richard Waterson was apprehended by Roin Caly, John Hill and John Avales and sent before Bonner. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

 
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John Glover

(d. 1555)

Gentleman. Elder brother to Robert Glover, the martyr, and brother to William Glover. Of Mancetter, Warwickshire.

Laurence Saunders sent John and Robert Glover a farewell letter on the morning he was burned.1570, p. 1674; 1576, p. 1428; 1583, p. 1502.

John Glover is described by Foxe as a constant professor of the gospel, who was 'exempted' after his death and cast out of the same church. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1891, 1576, p. 1615, 1583, p. 1714.

He wanted to take the place of his brother, Robert, but others persuaded him to avoid such risks. A search was then made for him late in Mary's reign by the authorities. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1615, 1583, p. 1714.

The mayor of Coventry warned John Glover of his impending arrest. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1615, 1583, p. 1714.

John Glover escaped being arrested as he was fit enough to flee, although his brother Robert was ill and so was apprehended. 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

John Glover hid in the woods while the authorities looked for him and examined his wife, Agnes. He died of an ague brought on by hiding in the woods. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

John Careless sent greetings to John Glover in a letter to Augustine Bernher. 1570, pp. 2109-10, 1576, pp. 1820-21.1583, pp. 1927-28.

After his death John Glover was buried in the churchyard but Chancellor Draycot demanded that he be dug up. The priest protested, as Glover had been buried for six weeks and therefore stank, so Draycot insisted that Glover be denounced as damned from the pulpit and then dug up after one year and his bones be thrown over the wall into the highway. This information was given by the parson of the town to Hugh Burrows of Fynden in Derbyshire and to Glover's wife, Agnes, who gave the information to Foxe. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

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Mrs Hollon

Sister of Elizabeth Lawson. Of Bedfield, Suffolk.

Mrs Hollon was forced to flee her home town for fear of persecution. 1563, p. 1696, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

 
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Mrs Wats

Wife of William Wats.

Wats' wife tried unsuccessfully to persuade Wats to leave the house where he was being kept while the constables slept. 1563, p. 1695, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

A stranger persuaded Wats to depart with his wife. 1563, p. 1695, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

Wats' wife returned home to Seal, thinking her husband had gone away but he returned home. 1563, p. 1696, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

When the constables came to search for Wats he could not be found, so they took his wife and set her in the stocks for two days. 1563, p. 1696, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

 
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Robert Glover

(d. 1555)

Martyr. Of Baxterley, Warwickshire; lived in Mancetter, Warwickshire. Married a niece of Latimer's. [DNB]

Laurence Saunders sent John and Robert Glover a farewell letter on the morning Saunders was burned. 1570, p. 1674; 1576, p. 1428; 1583, p. 1502.

Robert Glover was too ill to avoid being apprehended. 1563, p. 1773, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

Robert Glover wrote a letter to his wife. 1563, pp. 1273-80, 1570, pp. 1886-89, 1576, pp. 1615-19, 1583, pp. 1710-12.

In the letter to his wife, Glover stated that he was examined before bishop of Gloucester in Denton's house . 1563, pp. 1273-80, 1570, pp. 1886-89, 1576, pp. 1615-19, 1583, pp. 1710-12.

In the letter to his wife, Glover stated that he spoke with the sheriff [John Parker or Richard Hawtrey] before he was imprisoned. 1563, pp. 1273-80, 1570, pp. 1886-89, 1576, pp. 1615-19, 1583, pp. 1710-12.

In the letter to his wife, Glover stated that, while he was imprisoned, Hopkins and Dudley spoke to Glover about liberty of conscience. 1563, pp. 1273-80, 1570, pp. 1886-89, 1576, pp. 1615-19, 1583, pp. 1710-12.

In the letter to his wife, Glover stated that William Brasburge, Katherine Phines and Nicholas Hopkins visited him in prison.1563, p. 1276, 1570, p. 1887, 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1711.

Glover wrote a letter to to the mayor of Coventry. 1563, p. 1280, 1570, p. 1889, 1576, p. 1615, 1583, p. 1712.

Glover believed that when the bishop of Lichfield and Coventry and the chancellor had read his letter to the mayor of Coventry they had decided to try to do away with Glover while he was in prison. 1570, p. 1888, 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

He was sent to Lichfield and received by Telphcot, the chancellor's man sent from Coventry. 1570, p. 1889, 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

Telphcot and the bishop's servant, named Persey, were cruel to Glover. Persey became his jailor. 1570, p. 1889, 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

The chancellor and a prebendary named Temsey visited him in prison. 1570, p. 1889, 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

Telphcot and the jailor spoke to Glover in prison. 1563, p. 1281, 1570, p. 1889., 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

The chancellor and Temsey visited Glover and urged him to repent. 1563, p. 1281, 1570, p. 1889., 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

Robert Glover was examined and condemned by Draycot and Bayne. 1563, p. 1281, 1570, p. 1889., 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

Robert Glover was burned at Coventry with Cornelius Bungey on 19 September 1555. 1563, pp. 1278, 1282, 1570, p. 1891, 1576, p. 1619, 1583, p. 1713.

Information of Robert Glover's death was given to Foxe by Augustine Bernher. 1570, p. 1890, 1576, p. 1619, 1583, p. 1713.

He wrote a letter to his wife [BL, Harley Ms. 416, fos.8r-13r. Printed in 1563, pp. 1273-77 et seq.].

[Brother of John Glover.]

 
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Robert Hollon

Brother-in-law of Elizabeth Lawson. Of Bedfield, Suffolk.

Robert Holland's wife, Elizabeth Lawson's sister, was forced to flee her home town for fear of persecution. 1563, p. 1696, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

 
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Simon Harlstone

(fl. 1556 - 1562)

Matthew Parker's brother-in-law. (DNB sub Parker)

Morris stated in his confession that Pulleyne (alias Smith), Simon Harlestone and William, a Scot, were all preachers in the reign of Edward VI, and were now residing at the King's Head in Colchester. 1563, p. 1652, 1570, p. 2230, 1576, p. 1926, 1583, p. 2033.

Young told Simon Harlstone that Elizabeth Lawson's falling-sickness left her as soon as she was imprisoned. 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

In 1562 Blomfield threatened Simon Harlstone because Harlston would not wear vestments. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

[Not related to John Harlstone and his wife.]

 
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Sir John Silliard

(by 1518 - 1575).

Of Wetherden, Suffolk. MP for Ipswich (1553, 1555), Bodmin (1554), Preston (1554), Chippenham (1558). JP for Suffolk (1554 - 1556). Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk (1555 - 1556). (Bindoff)

High sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk.

After Thomas Spicer was condemned by Dunning he was handed over to Sir John Silliard. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Silliard spoke to Thomas Spicer, John Denny and Edmund Poole when they were at the stake. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Thomas Lovel, chief constable of 'Hoxne Hundred', and John Jacob and William Stannard, under-constables of the town of Laxfield, Suffolk, with Wolfren Dowsing and Nicholas Stannard, both catholics, were commanded to appear before Thurston, John Tyrrel, Master Kene, and John Sylliard (high sheriff) in September 1557. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

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Sir John Silliard, the sheriff, had Elizabeth Lawson removed to his house and held in irons. As she would still not repent, he returned her to jail. 1563, p. 1677, 1570, p. 2274, 1576, p. 1963, 1583, p. 2070.

 
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Thomas Christenmass

Of unknown occupation. Possibly of Tunbridge, Kent [not clear in Foxe's syntax]

Thomas Christenmass was itinerant in order to avoid persecution for his beliefs. 1563, p. 1696, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

He arrived in Rochester with his travelling companion,William Wats, where they asked an eight-year-old girl if there were any heretics in the town. She told them that there were heretics at the local inn and described them as catholics, hence Christenmass and Wats knew which place to avoid. 1563, p. 1696, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Wats

Of Tunbridge, Kent.

William Wats was itinerant in order to avoid persecution for his beliefs. 1563, p. 1695, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

He and his travelling companion,Thomas Christenmass, arrived in Rochester where they asked an eight-year-old girl if there were any heretics in the town. She told them that there were heretics at the local inn and described them as catholics, hence Christenmass and Wats knew which place to avoid. 1563, p. 1695, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

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William Wats dwelt in Seal, Kent, in 1557 and was apprehended there by his enemies and brought before the bishop and justices at Tunbridge. 1563, p. 1695, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

His wife tried unsuccessfully to persuade Wats to leave the house where he was being kept while the constables slept. 1563, p. 1695, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

A stranger persuaded Wats to depart with his wife. 1563, p. 1696, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

Wats' wife returned home to Seal, thinking her husband had gone away but he returned home. 1563, p. 1696, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

Wats ate and prayed and then hid outside in a holly bush. 1563, p. 1696, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

When the constables came to search for Wats he could not be found, so they took his wife and set her in the stocks for two days. 1563, p. 1696, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Bury St. Edmunds
Berry, Burie, Bury, Burye, S. Edmondsbury, Saint Edmundes Bury, Sainte Edmundes Burye, S. Edmunds Bury, S. Edmundsbury
NGR: TL 853 649

A borough and market town, having exclusive jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Thingoe, county of Suffolk. 26.5 miles north-west by north from Ipswich. The monastery at the dissolution was worth £2336 16s. per annum. Bury comprises the parishes of St. Mary and St. James. The living of each is a donative in the patronage of the mayor and corporation.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Lichfield
Lichfield, Lichfielde, Lichefield, Litchefield, Litchfield, Lychefield
NGR: SK 119 095

A city and county of itself, but locally in the county of Stafford. 16.5 miles south-east by east from Stafford. Lichfield, jointly with Coventry, is an episcopal see. The city comprises the parish of St. Mary, part of which is in the southern division of the hundred of Pirehill; St. Chad, part of which is in the northern division of the hundred of Offlow; and St. Michael, divided between the northern and southern divisions of the same hundred. The cathedral close is extra-parochial. St. Mary is a discharged vicarage; St. Chad and St. Michael are perpetual curacies; all in the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mancetter
Manceter, Mancetter
NGR: SP 315 965

A parish in the Atherstone division of the hundred of Huntingford, county of Warwick. 1.25 miles south-east from Atherstone. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Coventry and Diocese of Coventry and Lichfield

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mickfield
Michfield, Mickefyeld, Mickfield, Mickfielde
NGR: TM 135 618

A parish in the hundred of Bosmere and Claydon, county of Suffolk. 2.75 miles west-south-west from Debenham. The living is rectory in the Archdeaconry of Suffolk, diocese of Norwich

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Norwich
NGR: TG 230 070

A city and county of itself, locally in the hundred of Humbleyard, county of Norfolk, of which it is the capital. 108 miles north-east by north from London. The city comprises 33 parishes, and the liberty of the city a further four. Of these 37, three are rectories, 12 are discharged rectories, three are vicarages, one is a discharged vicarage, and 18 are perpetual curacies. St Andrew, St Helen, St James, St Paul and Lakenham are within the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter; the rest are in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Norwich, of which the city is the seat.

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Further information:

Andrews church (now St Andrews Hall) is at the junction of St Andrews Street and Elm Hill.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Rochester
NGR: TQ 730 686

An ancient city, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the lathe of Aylesford, county of Kent. 8.5 miles north from Maidstone. The city is the seat of the bishopric, and comprises the parishes of St Nicholas and St Margaret, both in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Rochester. St Margaret's is a vicarage in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter, and St Nicholas is a vicarage in the patronage of the bishop.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Seal
Seale
NGR: TQ 551 568

A parish in the hundred of Codsbeath, lathe of Sutton at Hone, county of Kent. 2.25 miles north-east from Sevenoaks. The living is a perpetual curacy annexed to the vicarage of Kemsing in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Rochester.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Tonbridge
Tunbridge
NGR: TQ 585 460

A parish in the lowey of Tonbridge, lathe of Aylesford, county of Kent. 14 miles west-south-west from Maidstone. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Rochester.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2095 [2071]

Queene Mary. Diuers saued by Gods prouidence from the fire, in Queene Maries dayes.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.First they layd her in a dungeon, and after that shee was caried vnto Norwich, and from thence to Bury Gaole, where at last she was condemned to be burnt. In þe mean tyme MarginaliaSyr Iohn Sylliarde Shrieffe.sir Iohn Sylliard had her home vnty hys house, hee beyng high Shiriffe that yere, where she was hardly kept and wrapped in irons, till at length when they by no wise could mooue her co recant, shee was sent to prison agayne with shamefull reuilings.

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Thus she continued in prison the space of two yeares and three quarters. MarginaliaElizabeth Lawson in prison two yeares and three quarters. In the meane tyme there was burnt her sonne and many other, whereby she would often say: MarginaliaElizabeth Lawson sory that shee was not burned.Good Lord, what is the cause that I may not come to thee with thy children? well, good Lord, thy blessed will be done, & not myne.

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Not long after this, (most happily) followed þe death of Queene Mary, after whom succeded our Queene that now is. At which tyme this Elizabeth Lawson remained yet still in Bury prison, till at last MarginaliaElizabeth Lawson bayled vpon suretyes in Q. Elizabethes tyme.she was bayled vppon sureties, or els she could not be deliuered. For she beyng a condemned person, neither the temporalty, nor yet spirituall authoritie would discharge her without sureties.

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Now she beyng abroad, and her sureties made afrayd by wicked men, sayd, they would cast her againe in prison, except she would see them discharged.

Then she got a supplication, to go vnto the Queenes maiestie, and came to a friend of hers to haue his counsail therein: who willed her to stay a while, because she was old, the dayes short, and the expenses great, and Winter fowle (for it was a little before Christmas) & to tary vntill Sommer. MarginaliaElizabeth Lawson preserued from persecution ended her lyfe in peace.In the meane tyme God brake the bond, & shortened her iourney: for hee tooke her home to hymselfe out of this lyfe in peace.

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MarginaliaElizabeth Lawson troubled with the falling sicknes, after her persecution neuer felte it more.This good old woman, long before she went to prison had the fallyng sicknesse, and told a friend of hers, one Symon Harlston, after she was apprehended, that she had it neuer more, but liued in good health & ioy of hart, through her Lord Christ.

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She had a very vnkinde man to her husbande, who while shee was in prison, solde away her raimente, and would not helpe her, and after she was out of prison, shee returned home vnto him, yet would he shew her no kindnesse, nor helpe her neither: and yet the house & land that he dwelt in, he had by her, wherfore as long as she lyued, she was found of the congregation.

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The said Elizabeth Lawson also had a sister, wyfe to one Rob. Hollon of Mickfield in the same countie of Suffolk, which likewise was persecuted and driuen out from house to house, & a yong man her sonne with her, because they would not go to the church to heare masse, & receyue the sacrament of the aultar. 

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 549, line 17

The first Edition of the "Acts and Monuments" then proceeds to give some brief notices of Martyrs, which in succeeding editions made way for what Foxe perhaps thought more important matter.

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¶ Thomas Christenmasse and William Wattes.

MarginaliaTho. Christenmas, W. Wattes.IN this perillous rage of Queene Maries raigne, were two men persecuted, one called Tho. Christenmas, the other Wil. Wats of Tunbridge in Kent. As these trauailed from place to place, not resting two nights together in one place, it happened them on a tyme to come to Rochester in Kent, where as they entryng into the Towne, euē at the Townes ende met with a little Damosell of eyght yeares of age, but whether she went, they knewe not. It was then night, and they wery, and fayne therfore would haue lyen in the same town, but could not tell where, they feared so the bloudy Catholickes. At last they deuised to aske the Damosell whether there were any heretikes in the towne, or no? and she said, yea. They asked her where. She aunswered them. At such an Inne, tellyng them the name, and where the Inne was. MarginaliaGods prouidence vpō Tho. Christenmas & W. Wattes.Shortly after, as they were gone from her, they bethought themselues better, and God so moouyng their hartes, they went to the childe agayne, and asked her how she knew that the Innekeper (of whome shee spake before) was an heretike. Marrie (quoth she) well enough, and his wyfe also. How knowest thou, prety mayden, said they? I pray thee tel vs. How know I, sayd she? Marrie because they go to the church: and those that will not holde vp their handes there, they will present them, and hee hymselfe goeth from house to house, to compel them to come to Church. When these two men heard this, they gaue God prayse, and auoyded that house, takyng the warnyng of that Mayde (of good bringyng vp, as it should seeme) to be Gods maruelous prouidence towards them.

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¶ Another escape of William Wats.

MarginaliaW. Wattes an other tyme deliuered by the Lordes prouidence.THis foresayd William Wats, dwelling in Queen Maries dayes at Seale in Kent, the last yere of her raigne

saue one, MarginaliaW. Wattes apprehended and brought before the Byshop.was apprehended by his enemies, and brought by the Constables before the Bish. and Iustices at Tunbridge, where the B. and Iustices would haue perswaded hym all they coulde, to turne from the truth: howbeit in vayne, for they could not remooue him, although they spēt all the forenoone therabouts, with many flattring words: so mercifull was the Lord vnto hym.

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Now, when dinner tyme was come, as they shoulde rise, they committed the prisoner to the constables againe, and so rose vp to go to diner. The Constables tooke Wats and led him to a vitailing house, where after they had wel filled themselues, they fel a sleepe, supposing their prisoner to be sure enough vnder their handes. Wats wife beyng then in the house with her husband, and very carefull for his well doyng, seyng the Constables thus fast a sleep, desired her husband to depart and go thence, for so much as the Lord had made such away for hym. Vnto which her words he would not consent, althogh she perswaded him all that she could.

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MarginaliaAn other notable example of the Lordes prouidence.At the last, (they replieng one against an other) a strāger heard them, and asked her what the matter was, that shee was so earnest with her husbande. The wyfe tolde hym. Then sayde the straunger vnto Wats these words: Father, goe thy wayes in Gods name, and tary no longer: the Lorde hath opened the way vnto thee. Wherevpon the sayde Wattes went hys way, and his wyfe departed from hym, and went home to her house at Seale, thinkyng her husband had gone another way. Nowe as she was goyng in at her dore tellyng her friendes of hys deliueraunce, immediately came the sayd Wattes in also, and they all beyng amased  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 550, line 23

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'amased' to 'abashed' in the text.} "Abashed" is the reading of 1563, changed afterwards into "amased." See Todd's Johnson. Caxton says (in Johnson's Typographia i. 197), "And thus between playn, rude, and curious, I stand abashed."

thereat, willed hym in all haste to get hym away, for they thought there would bee search for hym immediately.

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Then Wats sayd, he would eate meate first, and also pray: which he did, and afterward departed thence. MarginaliaW. Wattes deliuered out of his enemyes handes.So soone as he was out of the dores, and had hid hymselfe in an holly bush, immediately came the said constables with thirtie persons into the sayd house to search for him, MarginaliaW. Wattes sought for agayne.where they pierced the Fetherbeds, broke vp hys Chestes, and made such hauocke, that it was wonderfull: and euer among  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 550, line 21 from the bottom

This phrase, which signifies "at intervals" ... Instances of it are given in Halliwell's Dict. in voc.; and one easily accessible appears in the "Liturgical Services of the Reign of Q. Elizabeth," (Parker Soc.), p. 499, middle.

as they were searchyng, the Constables cryed: I will haue Wats, I will haue Wats I tel thee, I wil haue Wattes: but (God be thanked) Wats could not be found. And when they saw it booted not to search for hym, in the ende they tooke his wyfe, MarginaliaW. Wattes wyfe set in the stockes.and set her in a payre of stockes where she remayned two dayes, and she was very bolde in the truth, and at the last deliuered thorough the prouidence of God: whose name be glorified in all his workes, Amen.

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Iohn Glouer of Manceter, Gentleman.

MarginaliaGods prouidence in deliuering M. Iohn Glouer.WHat a fatherly and manifest prouidence of the Lord likewyse did appeare in the preseruyng of M. Iohn Glouer in the Diocesse of Couentry and Lichfield, in the Towne of Manceter: first at the takyng of Robert hys brother. At which tyme although the Commission came downe for hym, yet so God ordered the matter, that hys brother beyng sicke was apprehended, and yet hee beyng whole escaped, wherof mention is made before, pag. 1709. MarginaliaRead before pag. 1709.

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MarginaliaAn other narrow escape of M. Iohn Glouer.And agayne, another tyme how miraculously the mercifull prouidence of the Lorde wrought his escape oute of his enemies handes, they beyng at his chamber dore, and drawyng the latch to search for hym: and how hys wyfe the same tyme was taken and sent to Lichfielde, read before, pag. 1714. MarginaliaRead before pag. 1714.

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¶ One Dabney.

MarginaliaThe escape of a godly man called Dabney.THere was at London a certaine honest godly person, a Painter, named Dabney, whom Iohn Auales 

Commentary  *  Close

John Avales was an extremely zealous heresy hunter in London during the final years of Mary's reign. For other descriptions of his activities see 1563, p. 1696; 1570, p. 2275; 1576, p. 1964; 1583, p. 2071 and 1570, p. 2278; 1576, p. 1967 and 1583, p. 2074.

in the tyme of Queene Mary had brought before Boner to bee examined for his fayth. It happened the same tyme. as the sayde Dabney was there, that the Bishop was occupied with examination of other, so that hee was bidde to stand by, and to wayte the Bishops laysure. Vppon the same, or not long after, sodainely commeth worde to the Bishop to prepare hym in all speede, the generall procession taried for hym. The Bishop hearyng that, settyng all businesse aparte, bustleth 
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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 551, line 10

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'bustleth' to 'buscleth' in the text.} The Edition of 1563, p. 1696, reads "buscleth:" the word seems a form of "buckle" in the sense of "to prepare." The subsequent Editions read "bustleth."

hymselfe with all speede possible to the Churche, there to furnishe Procession. By reason whereof Dabney, which newly came to the house, was there left alone, while euery man els was busied in preparing and settyng themselues forwarde, accordyng as the case required.

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To bee short, as the tyme called on,  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 551, line 15

The first Edition, p. 1696, reads, "as the howr and tyme served."

Boner with hys houshold maketh hast so fast as they can out of the dores to

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