Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Alexander Wimshurst

(d. 1568)

BA (1545). Chaplain of Magdalen College, Oxford (1546). MA (1546). Rector of Tillington, Sussex (1548), of All Hallows, Bread Street (1559). Canon of Salisbury (1566). (Foster and Fasti)

Bonner sent Robin Caly (Robin Papist) to bring Wimshurst before him. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Caly apprehended Wimshurst. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

When he arrived at St Paul's, Wimshurst saw Chedsey, his old acquaintance at Oxford, and said to him that he would rather be examined by Martin than by anyone else. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Wimshurst was carried before Story and Cook who asked him where his whore was. Wimshurst defended his wife's honour and her whereabouts. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

He was sent to Cluney's house in Paternoster Row, where he was to be carried forward to Lollard's Tower, but Cluney, his wife and maid had no time to lock up Wimshurst as they were extremely busy. When Wimshurst was left alone in Cluney's hall, a woman came to him and told him this was his chance to escape, which he took. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

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[Died by 9 December 1568. (Fasti)]

 
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John Story

(1510? - 1571)

1st Regius Professor of Civil Law. Roman catholic martyr. (DNB)

John Story was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

In the 1563 edition, Foxe claims that Story urged that Elizabeth be executed, maintaining that it was pointless to cut the branches off a tree and not strike at its roots (1563, p. 1004). These passages were never reprinted.

In a letter to Augustine Bernher, Bradford asked him to discover what Master G. had said to Doctor Story and others. 1570, p. 1837, 1576, p. 1572, 1583, p. 1654.

Dr Story was said by Dr Martin to have been the chief procurer of the deaths of John Warren, his wife and daughter, although he was a relative of theirs. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

When John Denley sang a psalm at his burning, Story rebuked him for it. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1686.

John Story is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

The first examination of John Philpot was by Cholmley, Master Roper and John Story and one of the scribes of the Arches at Newgate Hall on 2 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89 , 1583, pp. 1795-96.

In Philpot's first examination, Story claimed that Philpot was guilty of heresy for speaking against the mass. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

Philpot's second examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story and Cook and the scribe on 24 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

During Philpot's second examination, Story demanded that Philpot be taken to Lollard's Tower, after which he was imprisoned in Bonner's coal house. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

Story was one of the commissioners who sent John Went, John Tudson, Thomas Brown and Joan Warren to be examined and imprisoned. 1563, p. 1453, 1570, p. 2016, 1576, p. 1737, 1583, p. 1845.

A complaint about John Tudson was sent to Story. 1563, p. 1467, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1749, 1583, p. 1857.

Cranmer was examined by Brookes, Martin and Story. 1563, pp. 1479-83, 1570, pp. 2046-47, 1576, pp. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

A new commission was sent to Rome for the restoration of the pope's authority to allow the condemnation of Cranmer. Those sent were: James Brookes, Martyn and Story . 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Story's oration against Cranmer. 1576, pp. 1769-70, 1583, pp. 1875-76.

Story said that they were true witnesses, as they swore allegience to the pope. Cranmer was was sent to Gloucester by Story. 1570, p. 2056, 1576, p. 1773, 1583, p. 1879.

Henry Adlington received a letter from John Careless, which referred to Story. 1570, pp. 2110-12, 1576, pp. 1833-34, 1583, pp. 1928-29.

Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 1980.

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Ralph Allerton was examined on 24 April 1557 before Bonner, Lord North, Dr Story and others. 1563, p. 1621, 1570, p. 2210-11, 1576, p. 1907-08, 1583, p. 2015-16.

A chaplain asked Thomas Green to repeat the articles of his faith before Story. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2061.

Story questioned Green on the mass and the church fathers. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Green appeared again before Story. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Story commanded Green be whipped 100 times, although this was objected to, at which point Story said he would have Green's tongue cut out if he could. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2062.

Elizabeth Young's eighth examination was before Bonner, the dean of St Paul's and Story. 1570, pp. 2273-74, 1576, pp. 1962-63, 1583, pp. 2069-70.

Alexander Wimshurst was carried before Story and Cook who asked him where his whore was. Wimshurst defended his wife's honour and her whereabouts. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Edward Benet asked Story to help him out of prison, which he did, only to deliver him to Cluney who put him in stocks in the coalhouse for a week. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Richard Waterson was examined by Story, when he was told that £40 would release him from punishment. This was reduced to £10 but eventually a warrant was made to Richard Grafton who was forced to watch the beating of Gye upon a cross at Bridewell. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

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John Story had accused Angel's wife of murdering a woman and her child who resided with her in her house. He sent her to Newgate. Sir Roger Cholmley dismissed the charges against her. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2010.

At Elizabeth's accession Story was committed to ward but he managed to escape overseas, where he met with the duke of Alva in Antwerp. 1583, p. 2153.

Parker, a merchant, was sent to apprehend Story and return him to England. 1583, p. 2153.

Parker told Story that a ship had come from England and that he might like to peruse the merchandise on board. Story suspected nothing, was caught and returned to England. 1583, p. 2153.

In prison, Story refused to agree to the act of supremacy and was subsequently hung, drawn and quartered as a traitor. 1583, p. 2153.

Foxe refers to his death. 1563, p. 1706.

 
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Lady Anne Knevet

(1458? - 1560?)

Gentlewoman. Of Wymondham, Norfolk. Daughter of Sir John Shelton of Garrow, Norfolk [Hasler].

Lady Anne Knevet was said by her neighbours to be around 100 years old. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Master Tollin [Tolwyn] held protestant services for Lady Anne Knevet. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

The bishop of Norwich threatened Knevet for her beliefs. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

She gave succour to many of the persecuted. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

She died peacefully in her sleep in the second year of Elizabeth's reign. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Foxe compared Lady Anne Knevet to Lady Elizabeth Fane. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

[Married Sir Edmund Knyvet (by 1508 - 1551) (MP, JP, Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk). Daughter of Sir John Shelton of Garrow, Norfolk. (Bindoff).]

 
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Lady Elizabeth Fane

(d. 1568)

Widow of Sir Ralph Fane. Great supporter of protestants. (DNB sub Sir Ralph Bane)

John Bradford wrote a letter to Lady Fane ('The true sense and sweete feeling') 1570, p. 1824, 1576, pp. 1559-60, 1583, p. 1842.

John Bradford wrote another letter to Lady Fane. ('As to myne owne soule') 1570, p. 1824, 1576, p. 1560, 1583, p. 1642.

John Bradford wrote another letter to Lady Vane ('The good spirite'). 1570, pp. 1829-31, 1576, pp. 1565-66, 1583, p. 1647.

Lady Fane wrote a letter to Bonner. 1563, p. 1445, 1570, p. 1999, 1576, p. 1724, 1583, pp. 1828-29.

She received several letters from John Philpot. 1570, pp. 2009-12, 1576, pp. 1730-33, 1583, pp. 1835-38.

[An anonymous letter (almost certainly sent by her) to bishop Bonner is in BL, Harley 416, fos.76r-v. It is a companion to the anonymous letter printed in 1583, pp. 1842-43.]

Foxe compared Lady Anne Knevet to Lady Elizabeth Fane. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

[Foxe refers to her as Elizabeth Vane.]

 
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Mrs Bosome

Wife of Bosome. Of Richmond, Surrey.

Mrs Bosome was called upon to go to church whilst at her mother's house in Richmond. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

She and her mother eventually attended church and she behaved herself accordingly, but they were apprehended by the constable and the churchwarden, named Sanders, who commanded them to appear the following day in Kingston. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

In the ferry across to Kingston, they met the constable and churchwarden , who later lamented to the ferryman that they had let the women pass through their hands. The ferryman told this to the women, who escaped. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

[Source for a story about Elizabeth Pepper.]

 
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Mrs Wimshurst

Wife of Alexander Wimshurst.

The wife of Alexander Wimshurst was called a whore by Story and Cook. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Her husband would not reveal her whereabouts. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

 
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Richard Cluney

Bonner's summoner. Keeper of Lollards Tower.

Cluney witnessed the degradation of John Hooper and John Rogers on 4 February 1555. 1563, p. 1058; 1570, p. 1681; 1576, p. 1435; 1583, p. 1508. [NB: Described as a bell ringer in 1563, p. 1058, but this was changed to summoner in later editions.]

Bonner's writ for the excommunication of John Tooley was sent to Cluney. 1563, p. 1143; 1570, p. 1757; 1576, p. 1501; 1583, p. 1582.

Robert Johnson wrote a letter to Bonner about Whittle, confirming Cluney's and Harpsfield's reports. He mentioned that Sir Thomas More's submission was read to him twice to no good effect. 1563, p. 1456, 1570, p. 2018, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, pp. 1846-47.

John Harpsfield wrote a letter to Bonner about Whittle's subscription, in which he mentioned Cluney's report. 1563, pp. 1455-56, 1570, pp. 2017-18, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, pp. 1846-47.

Margery Mearing was talking with a friend when she saw Cluney, Bonner's summoner, making his way to her house. Cluney took her away to be examined. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2031.

Cluney took William Living to his own house, robbed him, and then took him to Bonner's coalhouse and put him in the stocks. Cluney eventually brought him meat and then took him to Darbyshire who presented him with a list of names. Cluney took Julian Living to Lollards Tower. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

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John Fetty was taken by Richard Tanner and his fellow constables to Sir John Mordaunt who then sent him to Cluney, Bonner's summoner, who sent him to Lollards Tower and put him in the stocks. 1563, p. 1693, 1570, p. 2257, 1576, p. 1949, 1583, p. 2056.

The chaplains had Cluney take William Fetty to his father in Lollards Tower. 1563, p. 1693, 1570, p. 2256, 1576, p. 1948, 1583, p. 2055.

The child told his father what had happened, at which point Cluney seized the child and returned him to Bonner's house. 1563, p. 1693, 1570, p. 2256, 1576, p. 1948, 1583, p. 2055.

Thomas Green was transferred quickly from Lollards Tower to the coalhouse by Cluney and then put in the stocks. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

After examination, Cluney removed Green to prison again, first to the coalhouse and then the salthouse. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Cluney delivered Green to Trinian, the porter of Christ's hospital, where he was thrown into the dungeon. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

After Elizabeth Young's sixth examination, Darbyshire called on Cluney to take her away. Cluney took her to the stockhouse, where she was kept in irons, and then to Lollards Tower, where she was kept in stocks and irons. 1570, p. 2273, 1576, p. 1962, 1583, p. 2069.

Alexander Wimshurst was sent to Cluney's house in Paternoster Row, where he was to be carried forward to Lollard's Tower, but Cluney, his wife and maid had no time to lock up Wimshurst as they were extremely busy. When Wimshurst was left alone in Cluney's hall, a woman came to him and told him this was his chance to escape, which he took. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

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Edward Benet asked Story to help him out of prison, which he did, only to deliver him to Cluney who put him in stocks in the coalhouse for a week. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

[Foxe occasionally refers to him as 'Richard Cloney'.]

 
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Robin Caly

Persecutor of protestants.

Richard Gibson was sent for by a promoter called Robin Caly. 1563, p. 1640, 1570, p. 2224, 1576, p. 1920, 1583, p. 2026.

Caly acted impiously and cruelly towards Gibson as he transferred him from prison. 1563, p. 1641, 1570, p. 2224, 1576, p. 1920, 1583, p. 2026.

Bonner sent Robin Caly (Robin Papist) to bring Alexander Wimshurst before him. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Robin Caly apprehended Alexander Wimshurst. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

[Also known as Robin Papist.]

 
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Sanders

Churchwarden. Of Richmond, Surrey.

Mrs Bosome and her mother eventually attended church and she behaved herself accordingly but they were apprehended by the constable and the churchwarden, named Sanders, who commanded them to appear the following day in Kingston. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

 
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Thomas Martin

(d. 1597?)

Of Winterbourne St Martin, Dorset; Steeple Morden, Cambridge and London. DCL (1555), LLD (1587). MP Saltash (1553), Hindon (1554 and 1555), Ludgershall (1558). Chancellor to Stephen Gardiner by 1554. Commr. Visit Oxford University (1555), collect surveys and acct. religious houses (1556), heresy (1557), heretical books (1557). [Bindoff]

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Thomas Martin was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Thomas Martin searched John Hooper's room in the Fleet. 1563, p. 1056; 1570, pp. 1679-80; 1576, p. 1433; 1583, p. 1507.

George Tankerfield was sent into Newgate by Roger Cholmey and Dr Martin. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

Cranmer was examined by Brookes, Martin and Story. 1563, pp. 1479-83, 1570, pp. 2046-47, 1576, p. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

A new commission was sent to Rome for the restoration of the pope's authority to allow the condemnation of Cranmer. Those sent were: James Brookes, Martyn and Story . 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Foxe records Martyn's oration against Cranmer. 1570, pp. 2049-50, 1576, pp. 1767-68, 1583, p. 1874.

A talk took place between Cranmer and Martyn while Cranmer was in prison. 1576, pp. 1770-71, 1583, pp. 1876-77.

Martyn had demanded to know who Cranmer thought was supreme head of the church of England. 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1775, 1583, p. 1881.

John Careless' first examination was before Dr Martin, marshall of the King's Bench [Sir William Fitzwilliam - DNB + Hasler / Bindoff], Dr Martin's scribe and an unspecified priest in the lord chancellor's house. 1563, pp. 1529-35, 1570, pp. 2101-02, 1576, pp. 1813-14, 1583, pp. 1919-20.

Elizabeth Young's second examination was before Dr Martin. 1570, p. 2269, 1576, p. 1959, 1583, p. 2066.

Her third examination took place before Martin. 1570, pp. 2269-70, 1576, p. 1959, 1583, p. 2066.

Her fourth examination was before Bonner, Roger Cholmley, Cooke, Dr Roper of Kent, and Dr Martin. 1570, pp. 2270-71, 1576, pp. 1959-60, 1583, pp. 2066-67.

When Alexander Wimshurst arrived at St Paul's, he saw Chedsey, his old acquaintance at Oxford, and said to him that he would rather be examined by Martin than by anyone else. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Robert Horneby was delivered from condemnation by Dr Martin. 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2082.

 
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Tollin [or Tolwyn]

Minister of St Antholins, London early during Elizabeth's reign. [This is mentioned in 1563, p. 1698 only]

Master Tollin held protestant services for Lady Anne Knevet. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

 
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William Chedsey

(1510 - 1574?)

Of Somersetshire. Chaplain to Bishop Bonner. Archdeacon of Middlesex (1554 - 1559). President of Corpus Christi College, Oxford (1558 - 1559). [DNB; Fasti; Foster]

After the death of Edward VI Chedsey recanted and mutated his doctrine to his own purpose, as in his dispute with Peter Martyr.

Chedsey preached at Paul's Cross on 27 August 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

He argued with John Philpot in defence of transubstantiation in the 1553 convocation (1563, pp. 910-11; 1570, pp. 1574-75; 1576, p. 1342-3; and 1583, pp. 1413-14).

He was one of the catholic disputants in the Oxford disputations of 1554. He debated with Cranmer on the morning of Monday 16 April (1563, pp. 932-33, 939-43, 946-48, 951 and 954-55; 1570, pp. 1594-96, 1599-1600, 1602 and 1604-5; 1576, pp 1360-62, 1364-65, 1367 and 1369-70; 1583, pp. 1430-32, 1435-1436, 1437 and 1439-40).

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When Chedsey addressed the lord mayor of London, he mentioned two letters- one from the queen and another from the privy council. The council letter was about procession and prayer at the agreement of peace between England and France. The signatories were: Francis Shrewsberye, Penbroke, Thomas Cheyny, William Peter, Thomas Wharton and Richard Southwell. Foxe suggests that he had seen the letter. 1563, p. 1217.

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He published a declaration at Paul's Cross in May 1555. 1563, p. , 1570, p. , 1576, p. , 1583, p. .

Chedsey tried to persuade Hooper to recant after his condemnation on 29 January 1555. He was unsuccessful but false rumors circulated that Hooper had recanted. 1563, p. 1057; 1570, p. 1680; 1576, p. 1434; 1583, p. 1507.

He witnessed Bishop Bonner's burning Thomas Tomkins' hand with a candle. 1570, p. 1710; 1576, p. 1460; 1583, p. 1534.

In late June 1554, Chedsey discussed vernacular services and the adoration of the cross with Thomas Hawkes. The next day Chedsey preached in Bonner's chapel, extolling the saving power of the eucharist. 1563, pp. 1154-55; 1570, pp. 1763-64; 1576, p. 1506; 1583, p. 1589

Philpot's sixth examination was before the Lord Chamberlain to Queen Mary, Ferrars, Lord Rich, Lord St John, Lord Windsor, Lord Shandoys, Sir John Bridges, Chadsey and Bonner. 1563, pp. 1405-12, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

Philpot's seventh examination on 19 November 1555 was before Bonner, Rochester, chancellor of Lichfield, Chadsey and John Dee. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1702-05, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

During Philpot's ninth examination, Bonner called for John Harpsfield, who attended the session, to examine Philpot and Chadsey, who had however left for Westminster. 1563, pp. 1420-24, 1570, pp. 1983-85, 1576, pp. 1707-09, 1583, pp. 1815-16.

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

Philpot spoke with Worcester, Wright and Chadsey later the same day as his twelfth examination. 1570, pp. 1993-94, 1576, p. 1717, 1583, pp. 1823-24.

Later on the day of his thirteenth examination, Philpot spoke with John Harpsfield, Bonner and Chadsey. 1570, pp. 1996-97, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, pp. 1823-24.

The last examination of Philpot was on 16 December 1555 before Bonner and other bishops, including York, Chichester, Bath, John Harpsfield, Chadsey, Bonner, into which entered William Garret, knight, the lord mayor and the sheriff (Thomas Leigh) of London and Sir Martin Bowes, knight. 1563, p. 1441, 1570, pp. 1997-98, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1827.

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Chedsey testified in the presence of Master Moseley and the lieutenant of the Tower that Bartlett Green had denied transubstantiation. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

A declaration was made at Paul's Cross by William Chedsey at Bonner's commandment. 1563, p. 1217.

Benold was examined before Chedsey, John Kingston, John Boswell, the two bailiffs of Colchester (Robert Brown and Robert Mainard) and several others on 23 June 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

Elizabeth Folkes was examined before Chedsey, John Kingston, John Boswell, the two bailiffs of Colchester (Robert Brown and Robert Mainard) and several others on 23 June 1557. Chedsey wept when the sentence of condemnation was read against her. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

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When Alexander Wimshurst arrived at St Paul's, he saw Chedsey, his old acquaintance at Oxford, and said to him that he would rather be examined by Martin than by anyone else. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

William Wood was examined by Chedsey, Kenall and Robinson on 19 October 1554 in St Nicholas's church, Rochester. 1570, p. 2281, 1576, pp. 1969-70, 1583, p. 2077.

Chedsey was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

He sent a letter to Bonner dated 21 April 1558 [BL, Ms. Harley 416, fos.74r-v. Foxe describes the letter on 1570, p. 2301 et seq.]

[Foxe frequently refers to him as 'Chadsey'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Cooke

DD (1537). Fellow of All Souls (1527 - 1535) (Foster). Prebend of Kilsby (Lincoln) (1554 - 1559). Deprived after September 1559 (Fasti).

William Cooke was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

A letter was sent by the commissioners to Bonner requesting examination of the accused members of the London sacramentaries. The letter was dated 2 July 1555 and signed by Nicholas Hare, William Roper, Richard Rede, and William Cooke. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1689.

Philpot's second examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story and Cook and the scribe on 24 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

Dr Cook took part in the examination of William Tyms, Robert Drakes, Thomas Spurge, Richard Spurge, John Cavel and George Ambrose. 1570, pp. 2076-77, 1576, p. 1791, 1583, pp. 1896-97.

John Jackson was examined by Dr Cook 11 March 1556. Foxe records his questions and answers. 1563, pp. 1611-12, 1570, p. 2134, 1576, p. 1856, 1583, p. 1950.

Thomas Moore denied transubstantiation when examined by Dr Cook and so was condemned. 1570, p. 2134, 1576, pp. 1855-56, 1583, p. 1949.

Richard Woodman's first examination before Christopherson, Story, Cooke and others took place on 14 April 1557. 1563, pp. 1573-79, 1570, p. 2174-78, 1576, pp. 1877-81, 1583, pp. 1986-89.

Elizabeth Young's fourth examination was before Bonner, Roger Cholmley, Cooke, Dr Roper of Kent, and Dr Martin. 1570, pp. 2270-71, 1576, pp. 1959-60, 1583, pp. 2066-67.

Alexander Wimshurst was carried before Story and Cook who asked him where his whore was. Wimshurst defended his wife's honour and her whereabouts. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Kingston upon Thames
Kingston
NGR: TQ 190 660

A parish in the first division of the hundred of Kingston, county of Surrey, comprising the market town of Kingston, which has separate jurisdiction, and two hamlets. 12.5 miles south-west from London. The living is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Surrey, diocese of Winchester, and in the patronage of the Provost and Fellows of Kings College, Cambridge

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richmond, Surrey
Richmond
NGR: TQ 175 750

A parish in the first division of the hundred of Kingston, county of Surrey. 8 miles west-south-west from London. The living is a vicarage, consolidated with that of Kingston by Act of Parliament, in the Archdeaconry of Surrey and Diocese of Winchester.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Wymondham [Wimondham, Wymoundham]
NGR: TG 115 015

A parish in the hundred of Forhoe, county of Norfolk. 9 miles west-south-west from Norwich, comprising the market town of Wymondham, which forms the in-soken, and six divisions which form the out-soken. The living is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Norfolk, diocese of Norwich, and in the patronage of the Bishop of Ely

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Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

The reason for the use of this work of reference is that it presents the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take this reference as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2096 [2072]

Q. Mary. Diuers saued from burning of the fire by Gods prouidence.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.the procession. Dabney beyng left alone, commeth downe to the outward Court next the gate, there walkyng with hymselfe all heauy, lookyng for nothing lesse then to escape that daunger. MarginaliaGods secrete working in the deliuerance of Dabney.The Porter who was onely left at home, seeyng the man to walke alone, supposing hee had bene some Citizen there left behynde, and waityng for openyng of the Gate, went and opened the wicket, askyng if hee would goe out. Yea sayd he, with a good wyll, if ye wyll let me out. With all my hart quoth the porter, and I pray you so do.

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And thus the sayd Dabney taking the occasion offered of god, being let out by the porter, escaped out of þe wolues mouth. The procession beyng done, when the B. returned home, Dabney was gone and could not be found. Whereupon much search was made, but especially Ioh. Auales layd much priuy waite for hym: who after long searching, when he could not get hym, at length he receyued fifteene crownes of his wyfe to let hym alone when he should see him, and so that good man escaped.

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¶ Alexander Wimshurst. 
Commentary  *  Close

This account first appeared in the Rerum (pp. 637-38). In it, Foxe described Wimshurst as an old friend of his.

MarginaliaAlexander wimshurst a Minister, delieured by Gods prouidence from his enymies.A Like example of God almighties goodnes toward his afflicted seruaunts in that daungerous tyme of persecution may also appeare euidently in one Alexāder Wimshurst 

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 551, line 14 from the bottom

A friend of Foxe; "simul et veteri amico meo" (he says in the Rerum in Eccles. gest. Commentarii, p. 637): "Qui postea ad Evangelii cognitionem opera Thomæ Cooperi et quorundam adductus, in manus tandem adversariorum incidit, atque ad Bonerum perducitur."

a Priest, sometyme of Magdalene Colledge in Oxford, and then the Popes owne Knight, but since an earnest enemy to Antichrist, and a man better instructed in the true feare of God. It happened that one had promooted hym to Boner for religion, vppon what occasion I do not vnderstand. Accordyng to the olde maner in such causes prouided, he sent foorth Robin Caly, otherwyse called Robin Papist, one of his Whelpes to bring in the game, and to cause this silly poore man to appere before him. MarginaliaWymshurst taken by Robin Caly.Litle Robin lyke a proper man bestirreth hym in hys busines, and smelleth hym out, and when he had gotten hym, bringeth hym along by Chepeside, not sufferyng hym to talke with any of his acquaintaunce by the way, though there were of his olde friendes of Oxford that offered to speake vnto hym.

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When they came into Paules, it happened this Alexander to espy D. Chadsey there walkyng vp and downe. To whom, because he was able in such a case to doe pleasure, and for that he had bene of his olde acquaintaunce in Oxforde, he was very desirous to speake to hym ere hee went through. Chadsey perceiuyng that Robin Caly dyd attend vpon hym, sayd that he durst not meddle in þe matter. Yes (sayth little Robin) you may talke with hym if it please you M. Doctor. MarginaliaWymshurst talketh with Doct. Chadsey.To bee short, Alexander openeth his case, and in the ende desireth for old acquaintance sake that he would finde meanes he myght be rather broughte before Doctor Martine to bee examined, then any other. Nay sayth he (alledgyng the wordes of Christ vnto Peter in the last chapter of Saint Ioh.) MarginaliaD. Chadsey a sure friend at neede.You remember brother what is written in the Gospell: When thou wast yong thou diddest girde thy selfe, and wentest whether thou wouldest: but beyng aged, other men shall girde thee and leade thee whether thou wouldest not. Thus abusing the Scripture to hys priuate meanyng, whereas notwithstandyng hee might easily haue accomplished so small a request if it had liked hym.

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MarginaliaWymshurst brought to D. Story & D. Cooke, Commissioners.Thence was he caried to Story and Cooke Commissioners, there to learne what should become of hym. Before them he did vse hymselfe boldly & stoutly, as they on the other side did vrge him with captious questions very cruelly. When they had baited the poore man their fill, they asked hym where his whore was. She is not my whore (sayd he) but my lawful wife. She is thy whore, said they. She is not my whore (said he againe) but my wife I tell you. So whē they perceiued that he would not geue place vnto them, nor attribute to them so much as they looked for at his hand, accordyng to the ordinary maner MarginaliaWimshurst commaunded to prison.they cōmaunded him to prison. 

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 552, line 26

The Edition of 1563, p. 1697, more graphically, "they command."

And nowe marke well the prouidence of God in his preseruation.

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He was brought into Clunies house at Pater noster row, thence to be caried to Lollards tower out of hande, but that Cluny (as it happened) his wyfe and his mayde were so earnestly occupied about present busines, that as then they had not laisure to locke vp their prisoner. In the hall where Alexander sate, was a strange woman, whose husband was then presently in trouble for religiō, which perceiued by some one occasion or other, that this mā was brought in for the lyke cause. MarginaliaGood coūsell sent of God.Alacke good man sayth she: if you will you may escape the cruel hands of your enemies, forasmuch as they be all away that should looke vnto you, God hath opened the way vnto you of deliueraunce, and therefore loose not the oportunitie thereof, if you bee wise. With those and such lyke wordes beyng the perswaded,

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he gate out of the dores and went away without any hast making at all: so that if any had followed, he might haue bene easily recouered againe. MarginaliaA way made by Gods prouidēce to Alexander Wimshurst to escape.But vndoubtedly, it was Gods will that he should so escape the furie of his aduersaries, and be preserued from all daungers of death & imprisonment.

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¶ Bosomes wyfe. 
Commentary  *  Close

Bosome's wife also related a story to Foxe about the martyr Elizabeth Pepper (see 1563, p. 1734 and 1583, p. 2145). This would suggest that she was also Foxe's source for this anecdote.

MarginaliaBosoms wyfe.AS the workes of the Lord are not to bee kept secrete, whatsoeuer the persones be in whom it pleaseth hym to worke: so commeth to remembraunce the story of one Bosoms wyfe not vnworthy to be considered. This good woman beyng at Richmond with her mother, was greatly called vpō, and vrged to come to church. At length thorough importunate crying and calling vpon, she granted vnto them, and came. MarginaliaThe behauiour of Bosoms wyfe in the Church.Beyng in the church, & sittyng with her mother in the pue, contrary in al things to the doings of the Papistes shee behaued her selfe: to wit, when they kneeled, she stood, when they turned forward, shee turned backward, &c.

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This being notorious in the church, at length þe Constable and Churchwarden named Sanders, attached her in the Queenes name, MarginaliaBosoms wyfe summoned to appeare at Kingstone.charging her with her Mother, the next day to appeare at Kingston. Who at their commaundement so did.

The next day according as they were assigned, they came to Kingston to appeare before the foresayd officers, MarginaliaBosoms wyfe through Gods helpe escapeth.who at the same tyme (as it chanced) were going ouer the Fery, & meeting them by the way, salnted them by their names, but at that tyme had no further power to speake vnto them. Afterward, as they were in the boat goyng ouer, they knockt their hands, stampt and stared, lamētyng that they had let them so passe their hands. This the Feryman declared vnto them, and what they sayd in the boat. Whereupon the good woman taking her iourney to London, escaped their cruelty, through the secret working (no doubt) of the Lord: who in all his workes and euermore be praysed, Amen. 

Commentary  *  Close

In the 1563 edition (p. 1698) there was an anecdote here about the escape of John 'Moyse' (almost certainly John Noyes, see 1570, pp. 2217-19; 1576, pp. 1913-15 and 1583, pp. 2021-22) from the persecution of 'Master Nownd' (i.e., the Suffolk JP Francis Nunn). It was not reprinted, probably because Nunn, who was still alive, and very influential, objected to this account of his Marian past.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 553, line 20

The Edition of 1563, p. 1698, here gives the following narrative:- "Maister Nownd of Martilsham in Suffolke, justice of peace went to Debnham for to seke for one Moyse, who woulde not come to the Church, and when he could not fynd hym in the towne, he learned that he was in the feld. Thether he rode with his men following hym on fote to catch Moyse; but Moyse being aloft upon a cart, espied the stout Hunter, and perceiving that he was the pray, made hast of the carte and toke him to his feete out of the field. Nownd folowed with hast on horse back, and his men on fote. But Moise lept over a hedge so that the horseman could follow him no longer, but sent hys men after to hallowe and hunt. But God dyd so hyde poor Moyse in a smal covert, that they retorned without their pray. So was the labor of thungodly frustat. The same Nowne playd the watchman himselfe, in seking of Gouch and Drivers wyfe, with a javeling in his hand, lyke a tal speare man, and yet he never killed so much as a rat in his Princes warres. He being on his nags backe an after none, at dronken tyme of the daye toward night, made a lusty course lyke a tall man of war before hys wyfe, and asked her if she thought him not to be a lusty Champion, and so wente forth with hys speare and pytch forkes, and gaged the hay goffes, to seke out the sely soules, that were in quiet rest. But after Quene Elizabeth by the providence of God had obteyned the crown, the same Nownd tourning his typpet and hys tale at Wodbridge, complayned of the greate mysery that pore soules had suffered, and that men in office and authority were compelled to use suche greate violence and persecution against theyr willes. But wold to God that that horse that would not be ruled, but carry a man agaynst hys will, had eyther bene better broken, or faster tied in a halter. And how can such a Justice justly, and with a safe conscience, nowe punish adversaries of Goddes religion, remayning the same, and in the same office?"

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¶ Lady Kneuet in Northfolke. 
Commentary  *  Close

Lady Anne Knevet was an important sustainer and correspondent of several Marian martyrs, notably John Careless (see ECL MS 260, fos. 49r-50r and 227r-228r and ECL MS 262, fos. 105r-106v; also see Thomas S. Freeman, '"The Good Ministrye of Godlye and Vertuouse Women"', Journal of British Studies 39 [2000], p. 21 n. 60 and p. 29).

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MarginaliaThe Lady Anne Kneuet.AMong the number of the godly that were kept vnder the prouidence of the Lord in those perillous dayes, I may not forget an auncient good Lady of much worship, called Lady Anne Kneuet, who till her death dwelte in Norfolke, in a towne named Wimondham vj. miles from Norwich. Which sayd good Lady in Queen Maries days beyng iudged by the common people, more then an hundreth yeare of age, and by her owne estimation well towards a C. kept her selfe from their popish church, or hauyng any papisticall trash ministred in her house, but only the seruice that was vsed in the latter dayes of K. Edward the 6. which daily she had sayd before her, either by one M. Tollin 

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 553, middle

The first Edition, p. 1698, adds "now person of S. Antlins in London:" see Strype's Memorials under Henry VIII. ch. xlix; Life of Parker, I. iii. edit. 1821. The recantation which Tolwyn had to make before Bonner, and the terms of it, form the subject of Bale's "Yet a course at the Romyshe Foxe," Zurich, 1543, published under the name of Harryson.

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who was then by Gods prouidence preserued in her house, or els by one of her Gentlewomen or houshold seruant that could serue the place in the sayd M. Tollins absence.

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Now this worshipfull Lady continuing in this maner of true seruyng of God, MarginaliaLady Kneuet threatned by the Byshop.she and her familie were many tymes threatened by messengers, that the Bish. would visite her therfore. Vnto which messengrs she would always answer, that if his Lordship sent word before what day he would come, he should thereafter be entertained at her hand. But God, whose prouidence ruleth the ragyng seas, neuer suffred them al that toyling tyme to molest her. Although oftentimes whē she had seruice before her, there were very great enemies to the truth and of much authoritie, that came in, and kneled to prayer among them, and yet had no power to trouble her therfore.

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This good Lady (gentle Reader) kept good hospitalitie, as any in that countrey, of her liuyng. She also succored many persecuted that came to her house in the said Q. Maries dayes. Were they neuer so simple, they were estemed of her as the frends of þe gospel, and departed not frō her without money and meat. 

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 553, line 2 from the bottom

The first Edition, p. 1698, proceeds: "She had a very good memory, and no lesse rypenes of witte, very lowly, gentil and loving to every body, and herselfe beloved also both of man and child."

MarginaliaThe great age of the Lady Kneuet.Borne she was long before K. Edward the 4. dyed, and ended her life in the Lord Iesus peace, about the beginning of the 2. yeare of our most soueraigne Lady Queene Elizabeths raigne, as one fallyng into a most sweete sleepe. 
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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 554, fn 1

Thus she saw eight monarchs, exclusive of the lady Jane, in about ninety years. - ED. Appendix:To which the first Edition, p. 1698, adds: "The Lord graunt us to imitate her steppes, Amen. Thus did this good Lady finishe her race, and brought her graye heares with much honoure to the grave, whose steppes and life I wishe youth in themselves to make auncient, and the aged to make honorable, in feare and reverence to the holy name of the Lord. Amen."

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Vnto whom not vnworthely may bee compared MarginaliaLady Elizabeth Vane a great relieuer of Gods people.the Lady Elizabeth Vane, who likewyse beyng a great harborer and supporter of the afflicted Martyrs and Confessors of Christ, was in great hassards & daungers of the enemies, and yet notwithstandyng, thorough the mercifull prouidence of the Lord, remained still vntouched. Of this Lady Vane thou shalt read before.

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Iohn
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