Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Agnes Cutting

Agnes Cutting was a member of the congregation persecuted in Stoke, Suffolk. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

 
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Agnes Spaulding

Agnes Spaulding was a member of the congregation persecuted in Stoke, Suffolk. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

 
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Alice Coker

Of Stoke, Suffolk.

Alice Coker was the daughter of a woman named Eve, both of whom were persecuted as members of the congregation at Stoke, Suffolk. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

 
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Alice Spencer

Alice Spencer was a member of the congregation persecuted in Stoke, Suffolk. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

 
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Augustine Bernher

(d. 1567)

Clerk and servant of Latimer. Of Swiss or Belgian origin. [DNB]

When Hugh Latimer was committed to the Tower on 13 September 1553, 'his servant Austen' was allowed to attend him (1583, p. 1410) ('one Anstey, his servant' in APC IV, p. 346).

Augustine Bernher received a letter from John Bradford. 1570, p. 1837, 1576, p. 1572, 1583, p. 1654.

He received a letter from Nicholas Ridley. 1570, p. 1902, 1576, p. 1630, 1583, p. 1730.

He was a friend of Robert Glover. Information about Robert Glover's death was given to Foxe by Bernher. 1570, p. 1890, 1576, p. 1619, 1583, p. 1713.

John Careless wrote a letter to Augustine Bernher. 1570, pp. 2109-10, 1576, pp. 1820-21.1583, pp. 1927-28.

John Careless wrote another letter to A.B. [Augustine Bernher] 1570, pp. 2115-16, 1576, pp. 1838-39, 1583, pp. 1932-33.

Bernher was de facto leader of the clandestine London congregation late in Mary's reign. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

[See Thomas S. Freeman, 'Dissenters from a Dissenting Church: The Challenge of the Freewillers, 1550-1558' in The Beginnings of English Protestantism, ed. P. Marshall and A. Ryrie (Cambridge, 2002), pp. 129-56.]

 
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Cotes

Minister. Of Stoke, Suffolk.

Cotes tried to force his parishioners to receive the eucharist. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

 
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Cuthbert Symson

(d. 1558)

Martyr. Deacon of the protestant congregation in Marian London.

Foxe describes Cuthbert Symson's character. 1563, p. 1650, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2031.

Rough went to Symson and they agreed to give a book containing the names of the congregation to Kate Rough. 1563, p. 1650, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2032.

Kate Rough dreamed she saw James Mearing's wife with a bloody banner in her hand and a fire-pan on her head. 1570, p. 2228, 1583, p. 2032.

Rough was arrested by the vice-chamberlain of the queen's house at the Saracen's Head in Islington with Cuthbert Symson and Hugh Foxe on 12 December 1557. They had pretended to be there to hear a play but were actually reading their communion books. 1563, p. 1653, 1570, p. 2231, 1576, p. 1926, 1583, p. 2034.

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Cuthbert Symson was racked and condemned. 1563, p. 1651, 1570, p. 2229, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2032.

He was put in stocks prior to his condemnation. 1563, p. 1651, 1570, p. 2229, 1576, p. 1926, 1583, p. 2032.

He had a vision in the stocks which he reported to master Austen, to his wife, and to Thomas Symson. 1563, p. 1651, 1570, p. 2229, 1576, p. 1926, 1583, p. 2032.

Cluney checked on Symson in prison prior to his condemnation. Someone else also entered his cell. 1563, p. 1651, 1570, p. 2229, 1576, p. 1926, 1583, p. 2032.

Articles were brought against him and he answered. 1563, pp. 1653-64, 1570, p. 2230, 1576, pp. 1926, 1583, p. 2032.

Roger Sergeant gave information against Cuthbert Symson. 1563, p. 1652 [incorrectly numbered as 1632], 1570, p. 2229, 1576, p. 1926, 1583, p. 2032.

Symson wrote a letter to his wife. 1563, p. 1653 [incorrectly numbered 1633], 1570, pp. 2230-31, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, pp. 2033-34.

He was burned on 28 March 1558. 1563, p. 1650, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2034.

 
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Edmund Scambler [or Scamler]

(1510? - 1594)

DD (1564). Bishop of Peterbrough (1560 - 1584). Bishop of Norwich (1584) (DNB)

Edmund Scambler was leader of a clandestine London congregation late in Mary's reign. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

[See Brett Usher, 'In a Time of Persecution': New Light on the Secret Protestant Congregation in Marian London', John Foxe and the English Reformation, ed. David Loades (Suffolk, 1997), pp. 23351.]

Foxe refers to his installation as bishop of Peterborough after Elizabeth's accession. 1583, p. 2128.

 
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Edward Foxe

(d. 1538)

King's almoner. Provost of King's College (1528 - 1538) [DNB]

Alexander Seton and Edward Foxe lodged with Cressey while Thomas Cranmer was there and dined with him. The following day Henry VIII called Seton and Foxe to him to discuss his marriage. They then sent for Cranmer. 1570, p. 2033, 1576, p. 1755, 1583, p. 1860.

Stephen Gardiner was first sent to Rome and then to the emperor, with Edward Foxe, on behalf of Anne Bolyn in the matter of the king's divorce. 1570, p. 1951, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1785.

 
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Eve

(b. 1488?)

Of Stoke, Suffolk.

Eve was an old mother persecuted as a member of the congregation in Stoke, Suffolk. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

 
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Henry Cauker

Henry Cauker was a member of the congregation persecuted in Stoke, Suffolk. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

 
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Joan Fouke

Of Stoke, Suffolk.

Joan Fouke was a member of the congregation persecuted in Stoke, Suffolk. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

 
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John Avales

Described by Foxe as one of Queen Mary's servants. Probably a constable. Of Southwark.

John Lithal was brought for examination by John Avales. 1570, p. 2266, 1576, p. 1957, 1583, p. 2063.

Dabney was brought for examination before Bonner by John Avales. 1563, p. 1696, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

Unable to find Dabney, Avales demanded 15 crowns from his wife and eventually left them alone. 1563, p. 1697, 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Avales searched for a congregation in London and came close to spotting them. 1570, p. 2278, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2074.

He talked with two men in Pudding Lane but was unable to locate the underground congregation in the area. 1570, p. 2278, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2074.

Richard Waterson was apprehended by Roin Caly, John Hill and John Avales and sent before Bonner. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

 
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John Foxe

Of Stoke, Suffolk.

John Foxe was a member of the congregation persecuted in Stoke, Suffolk. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

John Foxe and John Steyre would not communicate when challenged. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

Foxe met with the women that his wife had talked to and begged their forgiveness. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

[Husband of Elizabeth Foxe. Not to be confused with John Foxe the martyrologist.]

 
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John Hopton

(d. 1558)

Bishop of Norwich (1554 - 1558) [DNB]

John Hopton was created bishop of Norwich (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

On 12 May 1555 the privy council ordered that Thomas Ross be delivered to Hopton to be made to recant or to be tried for heresy (1583, p. 1577).

Hopton was one of the commissioners who condemned John Bradford, Laurence Saunders and Rowland Taylor to death. 1570, p. 1699; 1576, p. 1450; 1583, pp. 1523-24.

On 12 May 1555 the privy council ordered that Thomas Ross be delivered to Hopton, either to be forced to recant, or to be tried for heresy. 1583, p. 1577.

James Abbes was caught and appeared before Dr Hopton. He recanted but when the bishop gave him 40 or 20 pence [Foxe is not sure] he recanted. He was burned in Bury on 2 August 1555. 1563, p. 1244, 1570, pp. 1864-65, 1576, p. 1594, 1583, p. 1683.

Robert Samuel was cruelly treated by Dr Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and/or Dr Dunnings, the chancellor [Foxe is not sure]. 1563, p. 1270, 1570, p. 1898, 1576, p. 1609, 1583, p. 1703.

William Allen was examined and condemned by the bishop of Norwich. 1570, p. 1883, 1576, p. 1613, 1583, p. 1707.

Roger Coo was examined by the bishop of Norwich, 12 August, 1555. 1563, pp. 1272-73, 1570, pp. 1883-84, 1576, p. 1613, 1583, p. 1707.

Thomas Cobbe was examined by Dunning but condemned by the bishop of Norwich with Roger Coo, William Allen, James Abbes, and Robert Samuel. He was burned at Thetford in September 1556. 1563, p. 1271, 1570, p. 1884, 1576, pp. 1613-14 , 1583, p. 1708.

Thomas Spicer, John Denny and Edmund Poole were condemned by John Hopton and Dunning and handed over to Sir John Silliard, high sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk. 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Roger Bernard was examined and condemned by Hopton. Adam Foster was sent to the Eye prison and then to Norwich to be examined and then condemned by Hopton. 1563, pp. 1527-28, 1570, pp. 2098-99, 1576, pp. 1810-11, 1583, p. 1917.

The second, third and fourth examinations of John Fortune were conducted by Hopton. 1570, pp. 2100-01, 1576, p. 1812, 1583, pp. 1918-19.

Peter and Anne Moone were presented before Hopton (bishop of Norwich) and Dunning (chancellor) during their visitation of Ipswich in 1556. Three articles were presented against Peter Moone and his answers given. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Simon Miller was imprisoned in the bishop's house. He was condemned by Hopton and his chancellor, Michael Dunning. 1563, pp. 1602-03, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

The second examination of Thomas Spurdance was by Hopton. 1570, pp. 2221-22, 1576, pp. 1917-18, 1583, pp. 2024-25.

John Fortune's second and third examinations were conducted by the bishop of Norwich, who condemned him. 1563, pp. 1636-38.

James Ashley was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Thomas Carman was examined and condemned by Hopton.1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

John Cooke was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Berry sent Thomas Hudson before Hopton. 1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

Alexander Lane was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Robert Miles was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Thomas Rose's second examination was before Hopton, W. Woodhouse, Dr Barret and others1570, p. 1978, 1576, pp. 1978-79, 1583, p. 2084.

Thomas Rose's last appearance was before Woodhouse and Hopton. 1570, p. 1979, 1576, pp. 1980-81, 1583, pp. 2085-86.

After being questioned by Sir John Tyrrel, William Seaman was sent before Bishop Hopton who then condemned him. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

John Noyes was condemned by the bishop of Norwich before Dunning, Sir W. Woodhouse, Sir Thomas Woodhouse, George Heyden, Master Spense, W. Farrar (alderman), Master Thurston, Winesden and others. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

John Hopton died after Queen Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

[1563, p. 1707, correctly states that Hopton died before Queen Mary. He died in August 1558.]

 
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John Rough

(d. 1557)

Minister. Martyr. Born in Scotland. Of Stirling. (DNB)

John Rough was originally a Black Friar in Stirling for sixteen years until the time when Lord Hamilton (earl of Arran) sued the archbishop of St Andrews. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

Rough was in the service of Hamilton for just one year. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

Rough was sent to preach in Ayr for four years. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

After the death of the David Beaton, he went to St Andrews. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

He was assigned a pension of £20 by Henry VIII. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

After the battle of Musselborough he went to Carlisle, then on to the duke of Somerset. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

He was sent as preacher to Carlisle, Berwick and Newcastle. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

He married in Newcastle. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

Rough was called by the archbishop of York to the benefice of Hull, where he remained until the death of Edward VI. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

He fled to Norden in Friesland upon the accession of Mary. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

He came to London on 10 November 1557. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

Foxe relates John Rough's sermon about and conversation with Dr Watson in which Rough berated Watson for his doctrinal beliefs. 1563, p. 1734.

Rough was betrayed by Roger Sergeant, a tailor. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2226, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

Rough was arrested by the vice-chamberlain of the queen's house at the Saracen's Head in Islington with Cuthbert Symson and Hugh Foxe on 12 December 1557. They had pretended to be there to hear a play but were actually reading their communion books. 1563, p. 1653, 1570, p. 2231, 1576, p. 1926, 1583, p. 2034.

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On 15 December 1557 a letter was sent by the archbishop of York, the earl of Shrewsbury, Edward Hastings, Anthony Montague, John Bourne and Henry Jerningham (members of the privy council) to Bishop Bonner along with the examinations of John Rough. They sent Rough to Newgate. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2226, 1576, pp. 1921-22., 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

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Articles were brought against him and he answered. 1563, pp. 1647-48, 1570, pp. 2226-27, 1576, pp. 1922-23, 1583, pp. 2029-30.

Rough attended the burning of Austoo at Smithfield. On his way home he met with Master Farrar, a merchant of Halifax, who asked him where he had been. 1563, p. 1648, 1570, p. 2227, 1576, p. 1923, 1583, p. 2034.

Rough was burned at London on 22 December 1557. 1563, p. 1735, 1570, p. 2227, 1576, p. 1923, 1583, p. 2030.

He wrote a letter to his godly friends. 1570, p. 2227, 1576, p. 1923, 1583, p. 2030.

He wrote a letter to the congregation two days before he burned. 1583, pp. 2030-31.

 
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John Steyre

Of unknown occupation. Of Stoke, Suffolk.

John Steyre was a member of the congregation persecuted in Stoke, Suffolk. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

John Foxe and John Steyre would not communicate when challenged. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

 
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Thomas Bentham

(1513 - 1579)

DD (1565). Perpetual fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford (1546). On the accession of Mary he was removed from the fellowship. He went into exile (see Christina Garrett, The Marian Exiles [Cambridge, 1966], pp. 86-87). Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry (1559). (DNB)

Thomas Bentham was a leader of a clandestine London congregation late in Mary's reign. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

He prayed boldly to the congregation at the burning of the last seven martyrs in Smithfield. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2074.

He was picked up by two men in St Katherine's on the pretence of sitting on an inquest for a drowned man, but he protested that he was not suitable for the post and that he was a scholar of Oxford. He was asked for evidence of his position. 1563, p. 1701, 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2074.

When Bentham was asked to swear upon a catholic primer, members of the inquest realised his confessional beliefs. 1563, p. 1701, 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2074.

A messenger suddenly arrived and dismissed the inquest, giving Bentham the chance to escape. 1563, p. 1701, 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2074.

Foxe refers to his installation after Elizabeth's accession. 1583, p. 2128.

 
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Thomas Carden

Minister. Of Lympne, Kent.

A congregation were due to meet at Thomas Carden's house at Black-friars, where a watch was laid in wait for them, but they were not caught. 1570, p. 2278, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

 
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Thomas Foule

Of London.

Thomas Foule was a leader of a clandestine London congregation late in Mary's reign. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2074.

 
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Thomas Simson

Deacon. Freewiller. Of Godstone, Surrey.

Thomas Simson entered John Kemp's house during a meeting with the attention of betraying those present. From that time he sought the company of Kemp and was converted. 1576, pp. 1975-77.

Thomas Simson warned a London congregation away from Aldgate, as the authorities were looking for them. 1570, p. 2278, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2074.

2098 [2074]

Queene Mary. Diuers deliuered by Gods prouidence from burning in Queene Maryes time.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.appoynted them 16. dayes respite after Easter, wherein as many as would, should receiue the Sacrament: those that would not, should stand to the peril that would folow. Of this company which were many, geuing theyr handes together, the chiefest doers were these. MarginaliaConfessors.

Eaue, an old woman of three
score yeares.
Alice Coker her daugher.
Elizabeth Foxe.
Agnes Cutting.
Alice Spenser.
Henry Cauker.
Ioane Fouke.
Agnes Spaulding.
Iohn Styre, and hys
brother.
Iohn Foxe.

These, after the order was taken for theyr not comming to the Church, tooke aduisement among themselues what was best to be done, and at length concluded by promise one to another, that they woulde not receiue at all. Yet some of them afterwarde being perswaded with fayre promises that the Communion should be ministred vnto them according to Kyng Edwardes booke, gat them vnto the parish Priest (whose name was MarginaliaCotes Parishe Priest at Stoke.Cotes) and asked him after whiche sort he woulde minister the Sacrament. He aunswere to such as he fauoured, that he woulde geue it after the right sort: the rest should haue it after the papisticall maner.

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Marginalia Iohn Steyre and Iohn Foxe reuolted.To be short, none did communicate so, but onely Iohn Steyre and Iohn Foxe: of whiche the one gaue his Wyfe leaue to do as she thought best. The other wēt about with threates to compell his wife, saying that otherwise hee would diuorce himselfe from her. As for the rest, they dyd withdraw themselues from church, resorting to their wōted company. Onely Foxes wife taried still at home, all in her dumpes and heauines, whose husband practised wyth the Curate in the meane time, that the nexte daye after he shoulde geue her the sacrament, whiche was the xvij. daye after Easter. But the very same day, vnknowing vnto her husband, she gat her selfe secretly to her companye, & with teares declared how violently her husband had delt wyth her. MarginaliaThe christian constancye of Elizabeth Foxe.The other women bad her notwithstanding to be of a good cheare, MarginaliaThe effecte of Christian prayer.and sayde that they woulde make theyr earnest prayers vnto the Lord, both for her and her husband, and in deed when they had so done, the matter tooke verye good successe. MarginaliaIohn Foxe recouered agayne to the truth by prayer.For the next day after, goodman Foxe came of his owne accorde vnto them, a farre other man then hee was before, and bewayled his owne headines and rashnesse, praying thē that they would forgeue him, promising euer after to be more strong in fayth, to the great reioysing both of them and his wife.

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MarginaliaThe womē of Stoke summoned by the Byshop.About halfe a yeare after this, the Bishop of Norwich sendeth forth certaine of his Officers or Apparatours thither, wich gaue them warning euery one to come to the Church the next Sonday following. If they woulde not come, they shoulde appeare before the Commissary out of hand, to render account of theyr absence. But the women hauing secret knowledge of this before, kept themselues out of the way for the nonce, to auoyd the sūmons or warning. Therefore when they were not at the Church at the day appoynted, the Commissary did first suspend them according to the Bishop of Romes lawe, and within three weekes after did excommunicate them. MarginaliaHow the women of Stoke escaped.Therefore when they perceiued that an Officer of the Towne was sette to take some of them, they conueying themselues priuily out of the towne, escaped all daunger.

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¶ The Congregation in London.

MarginaliaThe preseruation of the congregation at London.No less maruellons was the preseruation of the congregation in London, which from the first beginning of Queene Mary, to the latter end thereof, continued notwithstynding whatsoeuer the malice, deuise, searching and inquisition of men, or streitnes of lawes could work to the contrary. Such was the mercifull hand of the Lord, according to his accustomed goodnes, euer working with hys people. Of this great bountifull goodnes of the Lord, many and great examples appered in the congregation whiche now I speake of. How oft, and in what great daūgers did he deliuer them?

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MarginaliaThe congregation at M. Cardens house.First at the Blacke Friers, when they should haue resorted to Syr Thomas Cardens house, priuy watch was layd for them, but yet through the Lords vigilant prouidence the mischiefe was preuented, and they deliuered.

MarginaliaThe congregation agayne deliuered.Agayne howe narrowly did they escape about Algate, where spies were layd for them, & had not Thomas Simson 

Commentary  *  Close

On Thomas Simpson's importance in the London congregation, see Brett Usher, '"In a Time of Persecution": New Light on the Secret Protestant Congregation in Marian London' in John Foxe and the English Reformation (Aldershot: 1997), pp. 233-51.

the Deacō espied them, and bid them disperse thēselues away, they had bene taken. For within two houres the Constable comming to the house after they were gone, demannded of the wife what company had bene there. To whom she to excuse the matter, made aunswere agayne:

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saying that halfe a dosen good fellowes had bene there at breakefast, as they went a maying.

An other time also about the great conduit, they passing there through a very strayt Alley, into a Clothworkers loft, were espied, and the Sheriffes sent for but before they came, they hauing priuy knowledge thereof immediatly shifted away out of the Alley, Iohn Auales standing alone in the Mercers Chappell staring at them. MarginaliaThe congregation agayne deliuered.

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MarginaliaThe congregation in a shippe at Billinsgate.An other like escape they made in a ship at Billinsgate belonging to a certayne good man of Ley, where in the open sight of the people they were congregated together, & yet through Gods mighty power escaped.

MarginaliaThe congregation in a shippe betwixt Ratcliffe and Redriffe.Betwixt Ratcliffe and Redriffe, in a ship, called Iesus Ship, twise or thrise they assembled hauing there closely, after theyr accustomed maner, both Sermon, prayer & cōmunion, and yet through the protection of the Lorde they returned, although not vnspied, yet vntaken.

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MarginaliaThe congregation in a Coupers house in Pudding lane.Moreouer in a Coopers house in Pudding Lane, so neare they were to perill and daungers, that Iohn Auales comming into the house where they were, talked with the good man of the house, and after he had asked a question or two, departed, God so working that either he had no knowledge of them, or no power to apprehend them.

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MarginaliaThe congregation in a house in Thamis streeteBut they neuer escaped more hardly, thē once in Thames street in the night time, where the house being besette with enemies, yet as the Lord would, they were deliuered by the meanes of a Mariner, who being at that present in the same cōpany, and seing no other way to auoyd, pluckt of his slops, and swam to the next boate, and so rowed the company ouer, vsing his shoes in steed of owres, & so the ieopardy was dispatched.

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I haue heard of one who being sent to thē to take their names, and to espy theyr doinges, yet in being amongest them was conuerted and cryed them all mercy.

MarginaliaAn other notable example of Gods mercyfull prouidence.What should I speake of the extreame and present daūger whiche that Godly companye was in at the taking of maister Rough theyr minister, and Cutbert Simson their Deacon, had not the Lords prouidence geuen knowledge before to maister Rough in his sleepe that Cutbert should leaue behinde him at home the booke of all theyr names, which he was wont to cary about him? whereof mention is made before, pag, 2034.

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In this Church or congregation were sometyme xl. sometymes an hundred, sometimes two hundred, sometymes mo, and sometymes lesse. About the latter tyme of Queene Mary, it greatly increased. From the first beginnyng, which was about the first entry of Queen Maries reigne, MarginaliaThe Ministers of this congregation.they had diuers ministers, first M. Scamler, then Thom. Fowle, after him M. Rough, then M. Augustine Bernher, and last M. Bentham. 

Commentary  *  Close

In the 1563 edition, Foxe states that Bentham led the London congregation, along with Robert Cole. The mention of Cole was dropped from the 1570 edition.

Concerning the deliuerance of which M. Bentham (beyng now B. of Couentry and Lichfield) Gods mighty prouidence most notably is to be considered. For how is it possible by mans estimation, for the sayd M. Bentham to haue escaped, had not the present power of the Lord, passing all mens expectation, bene prest and redy  
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 559, line 18

"Thou art more prest to heare a sinner cire
Then he is quicke to climbe to thee on hye."
Gascoyne in "Select Poetry of the reign of Elizabeth" (Parker Soc.), p. 34.

to helpe his seruaunt in such a straite. The story and case is this:

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MarginaliaA story of Mayster BenthamAt what tyme the vij. last burned in Smithfield, mentioned in this booke before, pag. 2039. 

Commentary  *  Close

See 1563, pp. 1658-61; 1570, pp. 2235-40; 1576, pp. 1930-33 and 1583, pp. 2037-42.

were condemned & brought to the stake to suffer, came downe in the name of the king and Queene a MarginaliaThe Queenes proclamation, no man to pray for the Martyrs, nor to speake vnto them.proclamation, beyng twise pronounced openly to the people, first at Newgate, then at the stake where they should suffer, straightly charging and commanding, that no man should either pray for them, or speake to them, or once say God helpe them.

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It was appointed before of the godly there standyng together, which was a great multitude,  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 559, middle

On this accompanying circumstance Myles Hoggarde writes:- "At the deathes of which (Martyrs) you shall see more people in Smithfield flocking together in heaps in one day, than you shall see at a good sermon or exhortation mady be some learned man in a whole week." (fol. 49.)
On a subsequent leaf he pursues this topic: "And because our hereticks will needs have their men to be taken for martyrs, some of them counterfeyting the trade of the ancient state of the true Church, gather together the burnt bones of those stinking martyrs, intending thereby (by like) to shrine the same, or to preserve them for relicks; that at such a time as when an heretick is burnt, ye shall see a route enclosing the fire, for that purpose. And when the fire is done, they lie wallowing like pigs in a sty to scrape in that heretical dongehill for the said bones. Yea, and as it is reported, some gossips and fellow disciples of those wicked apostles use the same next to their hearts in the morning, being grated in a cup of Ale to preserve them from the chyncoughe, and such other maladies incident to such hot burning stomacks." (The Displaying of the Protestants, Lond. 1566, fol. 62, verso.)

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that so soone as the prisoners should be brought, they should goe to them to embrace and to comfort them, and so they did. For as the sayd Martyrs were comming toward the place in the peoples sighte, beyng brought with bils & glaues (as the custome is) the godly multitude and Congregation with a generall sway made toward the prisoners, in such maner, that the byllmē and the other officers beyng all thrust backe, could nothyng do, nor any thing come nigh. MarginaliaThe congregation embracing the Martyrs contrary to the Proclamation.So the godly people meetyng and embracing, and kissing them, brought them in their armes (which might as easily haue conueied them cleane away) vnto the place where they should suffer.

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This done, and the people geuing place to the Officers, the proclamation with a loud voyce was read to the people, containyng (as is before sayd) in the K. & Queens name, that no man should pray for them, or once speake a word vnto them. &c. MarginaliaM. Bentham Minister of the congregation.Maister Bentham, 

Commentary  *  Close

Foxe is drawing this account from a letter Bentham sent to Thomas Lever describing the incident. The letter is in Foxe's papers: BL, Harley MS 416, fo. 63r-v.

the minister then of the congregation, not sparyng for that, but as zeale and Christian charitie mooued hym, and seeyng the fire set to them, turnyng his eyes to the people, cried and sayd: We

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