Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Edward Benet

Probably an apprentice to Grynock, a baker. Of Queenhithe.

Edward Benet was asked by Tingle, a prisoner in Newgate, to bring him a New Testament. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Benet gave a copy of Coverdale's New Testament to Tingle, telling George the keeper that it was food. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Tingle's keeper realised that Benet had a New Testament and sent him to Cholmley who imprisoned him in the Compter for 25 weeks. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Edward Benet asked Story to help him out of prison, which he did, only to deliver him to Cluney who put him in stocks in the coalhouse for a week. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Bonner said Benet should be taken to Fulham to be whipped. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Buswell, a priest, spoke to Edward Benet whilst they were imprisoned together and gave him a copy of Cranmer's recantation. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Benet managed to escape after being forced to attend mass. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Edward Benet was apprehended again in Islington and sent before Sir Roger Cholmley but was cut off from the rest. He knocked at the gate and asked to come in but a fellow of his named Johnson (now dwelling in Hammersmith) warned him to go on his way. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

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[Not related to Mother Benet.]

 
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George

Keeper of Newgate prison. Of London.

Benet gave a copy of Coverdale's New Testament to Tingle, telling George the keeper that it was food. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

George realised that Benet had a New Testament and sent him to Cholmley who imprisoned him in the Compter for 25 weeks. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

[Foxe is unclear whether this is a christian name or a surname.]

 
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George Marsh

(1515? - 1555)

Farmer, curate and martyr [DNB]

Foxe recounts his early life. 1563, pp. 1118-19; 1570, p. 1731; 1576, p. 1478; 1583, p. 1561.

George Marsh refused to flee and surrendered to the authorities. 1570, pp. 1731-32; 1576, pp. 1478-79; 1583, pp. 1561-62.

He was examined and questioned by the earl of Derby. 1570, pp. 1732-35; 1576, pp. 1479-81; 1583, pp. 1562-64.

He was imprisoned at Latham House, the earl of Derby's residence. 1570, p. 1735; 1576, pp. 1481-1470 [recte 1482]; 1583, p. 1565.

He was imprisoned at Lancaster. 1563, p. 1119; 1570, pp. 1735-36; 1576, p. 1470; 1583, p. 1565. Marsh was supplied with meat and drink during his imprisonment by the mayor of Lancaster. 1570, p. 1646; 1576, p. 1440 [recte 1404]; 1583, p. 1475.

Marsh was examined by Bishop Cotes of Chester. 1563, pp. 1120-21; 1570, pp. 1736-37; 1576, pp. 1470 [recte 1482]- 1477 [recte 1483]; 1583, pp. 1565-66.

His final appearance before Bishop Cotes and condemnation: 1563, pp. 1120-21; 1570, pp. 1737-38; 1576, pp. 1477 [recte 1483]-1484; 1583, p. 1566.

Foxe recounts his martyrdom and posthumous denunciation as an heretic by Bishop Cotes. 1563, pp. 1121-22; 1570, p. 1738; 1576, p. 1484; 1583, pp. 1566-67.

His letters: 1563, pp. 1128-35; 1570, pp. 1735-48; 1576, pp. 1484-91; 1583, pp. 1567-74.

 
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Jeffrey Hurst

Nail maker. Of Shakerley, Lancashire.

Jeffrey Hurst was the son of a yeoman and married the sister of George Marsh. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

He fled to Yorkshire for fear of persecution, leaving his wife and child. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 1076.

He secretly returned home at night when possible. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

Hurst would secretly take communion with Reneses, Best, Brodbanke and Russel, who were all preachers. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

He returned home after the death of his father for around seven or eight weeks. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

The house was searched under the direction of Thomas Lelond, justice, and Hurst's books were found, including Tindal's translation of the New Testament. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

He was examined by Lelond. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

Hurst fell ill after performing the duty of ensuring that Queen Elizabeth's proceedings took place, and died. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

[Brother-in-law of George Marsh.]

[See Christopher Haigh, Reformation and Resistance in Tudor Lancashire (Cambridge, 1975), pp. 85, 172, 173, 187, 188, 192.]

 
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John Boswell [or Buswell]

Buswell, a priest, spoke to Edward Benet while they were imprisoned together and gave him a copy of Cranmer's recantation. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

 
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John Harpsfield

(1516 - 1578)

Chaplain to Bishop Bonner. Archdeacon of London (1554 - 1559); dean of Norwich (1558 - 1559). Brother of Nicholas Harpsfield. [DNB; Fasti]

Harpsfield preached a sermon at the commencement of the 1553 convocation (1570, p. 1571; 1576, p. 1340; and 1583, p. 1410).

He sparred with Philpot in the debates at the 1553 convocation. (See 1563, pp. 909, 912 and 914-15; 1570, pp. 1573-74 and 1576-78; 1576, pp. 1342 and 1345-46 and 1583, pp. 1412 and 1416-17).

He was one of the catholic disputants at the Oxford disputations of 1554; he debated with Cranmer and Ridley (1563, pp. 932-34, 938, 955, 967-69 and 978; 1570, pp. 1591-93 and 1605-6; 1576, pp. 1358-59 and 1370-71; 1583, pp. 1428, 1430 and 1440-41).

Harpsfield disputed on the eucharist for his D.D. on 19 April 1554; Cranmer disputed with him (1563, pp. 986-91; 1570, pp. 1627-32; 1576, pp. 1389-92; 1583, pp. 1459-63).

He gave a Latin oration in St Paul's before King Philip (1570, p. 1643; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

He witnessed Bonner's burning Tomkins' hand with a candle, and he urged Bonner to cease the torture (1570, pp. 1710-11; 1576, p. 1460; 1583, p.1534).

Together with William Chedsey and John Feckenham, Harpsfield attempted to persuade John Hooper to recant after his condemnation on 29 January 1555. The attempt was unsuccessful but it caused false rumors of Hooper's recantation to spread (1563, p. 1057; 1570, p. 1680; 1576, p. 1434; 1583, p. 1507).

Harpsfield witnessed the degradation of John Rogers and John Hooper on 4 February 1555 (1563, p. 1058; 1570, p. 1681; 1576, p. 1435; 1583, p. 1508).

He was one of those who presided over the examination of Thomas Tomkins on 9 February 1555 (1570, p. 1712; 1576, p. 1461; 1583, p. 1535).

Harpsfield was one of those who examined Thomas Causton and Thomas Higbed on 18 February 1555 (1563, p. 1104). Bonner ordered him to deliver a rebuttal to the confession of faith of Thomas Causton and Thomas Higbed (1563, p. 1107; 1570, p. 1719; 1576, p. 1468; 1583, p. 1541).

He conversed with Thomas Hawkes in June 1554, arguing the necessity of infant baptism. 1563, pp. 1151-52;1570, pp. 1760-61; 1576, p. 1551 [recte 1503]; 1583, pp. 1587-88

He escorted Thomas Hawkes to the Gatehouse at Westminster on 1 July 1554. 1563, p. 1156; 1570, p. 1765;1576, p. 1765; 1583, p. 1590

John Harpsfield conferred with the bishop of Durham about John Bradford. 1563, p. 1191, 1570, p. 1787, 1576, p. 1526, 1583, p. 1609.

On 16 February 1555 John Harpsfield and two others went to see Bradford in prison, to defend the line of bishops in the catholic church. Bradford refuted the argument. 1563, pp. 1202-03, 1570, pp. 1792-93, 1576, pp. 1530-31, 1583, pp. 1614-15.

Smith was examined by Bonner and Harpsfield, among others, met with Harwood in the garden, and was re-examined. Smith was then left in the garden until Harwood was examined, after which Smith was examined again. 1563, pp. 1252-55, 1570, pp. 1870-72, 1576, pp. 1601-03, 1583, pp. 1691-92.

Robert Smith was examined by John Dee, Harpsfield and Bonner on eucharistic doctrine. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

Philpot's fourth examination was in John Harpsfield's house before Bonner, Bath, Worcester and Gloucester. 1563, pp. 1393-98, 1570, pp. 1965-68, 1576, pp. 1692-95, 1583, pp. 1799-1803.

[In a letter that was never delivered] Green told Philpot of his presentment on 17 November before Bonner and two bishops, Master Dean, Roper, Welch, John Harpsfield, and two or three others. Dr Dale, Master George Mordant and Master Dee were also there. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

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Philpot's eighth examination was before Bonner, John Harpsfield, St David's, Mordant and others. 1563, pp. 1419-20, 1570, pp. 1982-83, 1576, pp. 1705-06, 1583, p. 1814.

During Philpot's ninth examination, Bonner called for John Harpsfield, who attended the session to examine Philpot, and Chadsey, who had however left for Westminster. 1563, pp. 1420-24, 1570, pp. 1983-85, 1576, pp. 1707-09, 1583, pp. 1815-16.

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

Later on the day of his thirteenth examination, Philpot spoke with John Harpsfield, Bonner and Chadsey. 1570, pp. 1996-97, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, pp. 1823-24.

John Harpsfield urged Thomas Whittle to recant and composed a bill of submission for Whittle to sign. 1563, pp. 1454-55, 1570, p. 2017, 1576, p. 1737, 1583, pp. 1845-46.

John Harpsfield wrote a letter to Bonner about Whittle's suscription. It mentioned one of Penbroke's men who wanted license to erect a school. Harpsfield hoped for Penbroke's sake that it be requested, and he and M Johnson (Register) were working to that effect. 1563, pp. 1455-56, 1570, pp. 2017-18, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, pp. 1846-47. [In all editions after 1563, the heading incorrectly gives the author of the letter as Nicholas Harpsfield.]

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Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2097.

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Bonner sent Thomas Hinshaw before John Harpsfield and Henry Cole. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Bonner attended evensong with John Harpsfield prior to causing several boys to be beaten in 1558. 1563, p. 1692, 1570, p. 2264, 1576, p. 1955, 1583, p. 2061.

Bonner and Harpsfield laughed at and mocked Edward Benet for his beliefs. 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Harpsfield was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
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John Story

(1510? - 1571)

1st Regius Professor of Civil Law. Roman catholic martyr. (DNB)

John Story was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

In the 1563 edition, Foxe claims that Story urged that Elizabeth be executed, maintaining that it was pointless to cut the branches off a tree and not strike at its roots (1563, p. 1004). These passages were never reprinted.

In a letter to Augustine Bernher, Bradford asked him to discover what Master G. had said to Doctor Story and others. 1570, p. 1837, 1576, p. 1572, 1583, p. 1654.

Dr Story was said by Dr Martin to have been the chief procurer of the deaths of John Warren, his wife and daughter, although he was a relative of theirs. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

When John Denley sang a psalm at his burning, Story rebuked him for it. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1686.

John Story is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

The first examination of John Philpot was by Cholmley, Master Roper and John Story and one of the scribes of the Arches at Newgate Hall on 2 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89 , 1583, pp. 1795-96.

In Philpot's first examination, Story claimed that Philpot was guilty of heresy for speaking against the mass. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

Philpot's second examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story and Cook and the scribe on 24 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

During Philpot's second examination, Story demanded that Philpot be taken to Lollard's Tower, after which he was imprisoned in Bonner's coal house. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

Story was one of the commissioners who sent John Went, John Tudson, Thomas Brown and Joan Warren to be examined and imprisoned. 1563, p. 1453, 1570, p. 2016, 1576, p. 1737, 1583, p. 1845.

A complaint about John Tudson was sent to Story. 1563, p. 1467, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1749, 1583, p. 1857.

Cranmer was examined by Brookes, Martin and Story. 1563, pp. 1479-83, 1570, pp. 2046-47, 1576, pp. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

A new commission was sent to Rome for the restoration of the pope's authority to allow the condemnation of Cranmer. Those sent were: James Brookes, Martyn and Story . 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Story's oration against Cranmer. 1576, pp. 1769-70, 1583, pp. 1875-76.

Story said that they were true witnesses, as they swore allegience to the pope. Cranmer was was sent to Gloucester by Story. 1570, p. 2056, 1576, p. 1773, 1583, p. 1879.

Henry Adlington received a letter from John Careless, which referred to Story. 1570, pp. 2110-12, 1576, pp. 1833-34, 1583, pp. 1928-29.

Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 1980.

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Ralph Allerton was examined on 24 April 1557 before Bonner, Lord North, Dr Story and others. 1563, p. 1621, 1570, p. 2210-11, 1576, p. 1907-08, 1583, p. 2015-16.

A chaplain asked Thomas Green to repeat the articles of his faith before Story. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2061.

Story questioned Green on the mass and the church fathers. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Green appeared again before Story. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Story commanded Green be whipped 100 times, although this was objected to, at which point Story said he would have Green's tongue cut out if he could. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2062.

Elizabeth Young's eighth examination was before Bonner, the dean of St Paul's and Story. 1570, pp. 2273-74, 1576, pp. 1962-63, 1583, pp. 2069-70.

Alexander Wimshurst was carried before Story and Cook who asked him where his whore was. Wimshurst defended his wife's honour and her whereabouts. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Edward Benet asked Story to help him out of prison, which he did, only to deliver him to Cluney who put him in stocks in the coalhouse for a week. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Richard Waterson was examined by Story, when he was told that £40 would release him from punishment. This was reduced to £10 but eventually a warrant was made to Richard Grafton who was forced to watch the beating of Gye upon a cross at Bridewell. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

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John Story had accused Angel's wife of murdering a woman and her child who resided with her in her house. He sent her to Newgate. Sir Roger Cholmley dismissed the charges against her. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2010.

At Elizabeth's accession Story was committed to ward but he managed to escape overseas, where he met with the duke of Alva in Antwerp. 1583, p. 2153.

Parker, a merchant, was sent to apprehend Story and return him to England. 1583, p. 2153.

Parker told Story that a ship had come from England and that he might like to peruse the merchandise on board. Story suspected nothing, was caught and returned to England. 1583, p. 2153.

In prison, Story refused to agree to the act of supremacy and was subsequently hung, drawn and quartered as a traitor. 1583, p. 2153.

Foxe refers to his death. 1563, p. 1706.

 
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John Thorpe

Of Calais.

After the Duke of Guise had taken Calais, John Thorpe and his wife, a godly couple, were cast into the fields and had their child taken from them by the soldiers. 1563, p. 1702, 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2075.

His wife, who was very ill, was carried nearly a mile by strangers, who took her to a village for the night, where she was able to recover. 1563, p. 1702, 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2075.

The next day Thorpe and his wife returned to England, where by chance they went to an inn where they found their child sitting by the fireside. 1563, p. 1702, 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2075.

 
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Miles Coverdale

(1488 - 1568)

Evangelist, Bible translator, Bishop of Exeter (1551 - 1553) (DNB)

Miles Coverdale associated with John Rogers and William Tyndale in translating the Bible (1563, p. 1022; 1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1484).

He was ordered to attend the Privy Council on 22 August 1553 (1583, p. 1497 [recte 1409]).

On 31 August, Coverdale appeared before the Privy Council and on the next day was commanded to await their pleasure (1583, p. 1497 [recte 1409]).

According to Foxe, he wrote a confutation of Weston's Paul's Cross sermon of 20 October 1553. Foxe claimed that he possessed a copy of Coverdale's confutation; it has not survived (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p 1396; and 1583, p. 1466).

Coverdale was a signatory to the letter of 8 May 1554 protesting the proposed disputation at Cambridge. The letter is printed in 1563, pp. 1001-3; 1570, pp. 1639-41 [Coverdale's signature is on p. 1642]; 1576, pp. 1399-1400; and 1583, p. 1469-71.

Coverdale sent Rowland Taylor a cap to wear at his execution (1570, p. 1704; 1576, p. 1454; 1583, p. 1557).

Throughout 1554, Christian III of Denmark repeatedly requested that Mary release Coverdale from custody and send him to Denmark. Although Mary was reluctant to grant the request, eventually she agreed, sending Coverdale to Denmark in February 1555 (1563, pp. 1081-83; 1570, pp. 1706-7; 1576, pp. 1456-57; 1583, pp. 1529-31).

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Mistress Shakerley

Of Shakerley, Lancashire.

Mistress Shakerley was Jeffrey Hurst's mother's landlady. Thomas Lelond waited for her arrival before sending his priest, one of his men, and one of Mistress Shakerley's men to search the house for books. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

[This woman's name is also the name of the village in which she lived. It is possible this was a transcription error made by Foxe.]

 
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Mr Johnson

Member of the Islington conventicle. Of unknown occupation. Living in Hammersmith in 1570.

Edward Benet was apprehended again in Islington and sent before Cholmley but was cut off from his fellows. He knocked at the gate and asked to come in but a fellow of his named Johnson warned him to go on his way. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

 
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Mrs Thorpe

Of Calais.

After the Duke of Guise had taken Calais, John Thorpe and his wife, a godly couple, were cast into the fields and had their child taken from them by the soldiers. 1563, p. 1702, 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2075.

His wife, who was very ill, was carried nearly a mile by strangers, who took her to a village for the night, where she was able to recover. 1563, p. 1702, 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2075.

The next day Thorpe and his wife returned to England, where by chance they went to an inn where they found their child sitting by the fireside. 1563, p. 1702, 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2075.

 
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Richard Cluney

Bonner's summoner. Keeper of Lollards Tower.

Cluney witnessed the degradation of John Hooper and John Rogers on 4 February 1555. 1563, p. 1058; 1570, p. 1681; 1576, p. 1435; 1583, p. 1508. [NB: Described as a bell ringer in 1563, p. 1058, but this was changed to summoner in later editions.]

Bonner's writ for the excommunication of John Tooley was sent to Cluney. 1563, p. 1143; 1570, p. 1757; 1576, p. 1501; 1583, p. 1582.

Robert Johnson wrote a letter to Bonner about Whittle, confirming Cluney's and Harpsfield's reports. He mentioned that Sir Thomas More's submission was read to him twice to no good effect. 1563, p. 1456, 1570, p. 2018, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, pp. 1846-47.

John Harpsfield wrote a letter to Bonner about Whittle's subscription, in which he mentioned Cluney's report. 1563, pp. 1455-56, 1570, pp. 2017-18, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, pp. 1846-47.

Margery Mearing was talking with a friend when she saw Cluney, Bonner's summoner, making his way to her house. Cluney took her away to be examined. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2031.

Cluney took William Living to his own house, robbed him, and then took him to Bonner's coalhouse and put him in the stocks. Cluney eventually brought him meat and then took him to Darbyshire who presented him with a list of names. Cluney took Julian Living to Lollards Tower. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

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John Fetty was taken by Richard Tanner and his fellow constables to Sir John Mordaunt who then sent him to Cluney, Bonner's summoner, who sent him to Lollards Tower and put him in the stocks. 1563, p. 1693, 1570, p. 2257, 1576, p. 1949, 1583, p. 2056.

The chaplains had Cluney take William Fetty to his father in Lollards Tower. 1563, p. 1693, 1570, p. 2256, 1576, p. 1948, 1583, p. 2055.

The child told his father what had happened, at which point Cluney seized the child and returned him to Bonner's house. 1563, p. 1693, 1570, p. 2256, 1576, p. 1948, 1583, p. 2055.

Thomas Green was transferred quickly from Lollards Tower to the coalhouse by Cluney and then put in the stocks. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

After examination, Cluney removed Green to prison again, first to the coalhouse and then the salthouse. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Cluney delivered Green to Trinian, the porter of Christ's hospital, where he was thrown into the dungeon. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

After Elizabeth Young's sixth examination, Darbyshire called on Cluney to take her away. Cluney took her to the stockhouse, where she was kept in irons, and then to Lollards Tower, where she was kept in stocks and irons. 1570, p. 2273, 1576, p. 1962, 1583, p. 2069.

Alexander Wimshurst was sent to Cluney's house in Paternoster Row, where he was to be carried forward to Lollard's Tower, but Cluney, his wife and maid had no time to lock up Wimshurst as they were extremely busy. When Wimshurst was left alone in Cluney's hall, a woman came to him and told him this was his chance to escape, which he took. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

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Edward Benet asked Story to help him out of prison, which he did, only to deliver him to Cluney who put him in stocks in the coalhouse for a week. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

[Foxe occasionally refers to him as 'Richard Cloney'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Roger Cholmley

(d. 1565)

Lord chief justice of King's and Queen's Bench (1552 - 1553), privy councillor (under Mary) and MP [Bindoff, Commons; Hasler, Commons; DNB]. Judge, lieutenant of the Tower. Son of Sir Richard Cholmley [DNB]

Sir Roger Cholmley persuaded the royal guard to support Northumberland against Mary (1570, p. 1568; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, p. 1407).

He was sent to the Tower, with Sir Edward Montagu, on 27 July 1553 (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1465).

He was released from the Tower together with Sir Edward Montagu on 7 September 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

Sir Roger Cholmley was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Cholmley participated in a debate/dinner conversation between Nicholas Ridley and John Feckenham and Sir John Bourne, on the nature of the eucharist, held while Ridley was a prisoner in the Tower (1563, p. 931; 1570, p. 1591; 1576, pp. 1357-58; and 1583, p. 1428).

Cholmley came to William Flower at the stake and urged Flower, on pain of damnation, to recant his heretical beliefs. 1563, p. 1733; 1570, p. 1749; 1576, p. 1493; 1583, p. 1577.

George Tankerfield was sent into Newgate by Roger Cholmey and Dr Martin. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

Philpot's first examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story, and one of the scribes of the Arches at Newgate Hall, 2 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

Cholmley was one of the commissioners who sent John Went, John Tudson, Thomas Brown and Joan Warren to be examined and imprisoned. 1563, p. 1453, 1570, p. 2016, 1576, p. 1737, 1583, p. 1845.

A complaint about John Tudson was made to Cholmley. 1563, p. 1467, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1749, 1583, p. 1857. [Foxe erroneously calls him 'Sir Richard Cholmley'.]

Cuthbert Symson was brought before Cholmley, examined and racked. 1563, p. 1651, 1570, p. 2229, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2032.

Cholmley sent to Newgate 27 prisoners who were members of an illegal conventicle in Islington. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

Thomas Hinshaw was taken by the constables of Islington to appear before Master Cholmley, who sent him to Newgate. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Robert Farrer, haberdasher of London, had two daughters, one of whom was delivered to Sir Roger Cholmley for a sum of money, to be at his commandment, the other sold to Sir William Godolphin, who took her to Boulogne as his lackey, dressed in men's clothing. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2294.

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The lord mayor of London and Chomley examined Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax. 1563, p. 1683, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

Elizabeth Young's fourth examination was before Bonner, Roger Cholmley, Cooke, Dr Roper of Kent, and Dr Martin. 1570, pp. 2270-71, 1576, pp. 1959-60, 1583, pp. 2066-67.

Tingle was a prisoner in Newgate. His keeper realised that Edward Benet had a New Testament and sent him to Cholmley, who imprisoned him in the Compter for 25 weeks. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Benet was apprehended again in Islington and sent before Cholmley but was cut off from the rest. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

John Story had accused Angel's wife of murdering a woman and her child who resided with her in her house. He sent her to Newgate. Sir Roger Cholmley dismissed the charges against her. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2010.

[Also referred to as 'Lorde Chiefe Baron' or 'Chomley']

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Tingle

Prisoner in Newgate. Of unknown occupation and origin.

Edward Benet was asked by Tingle, a prisoner in Newgate, to bring him a New Testament. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Benet brought a copy of Coverdale's New Testament to Tingle, telling George the keeper that it was food. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Tingle's keeper realised that Benet had a New Testament and sent him to Cholmley who imprisoned him in the Compter for 25 weeks. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Tingle died in prison and was buried in a dunghill. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Islington
Iselington, Islington, Islyngton
NGR: TQ 305 850

A parish in the Finsbury division of the hundred of Ossulstone, county of Middlesex. 2 miles north by west from London. The living is a vicarage in the jurisdiction of the Commissary of London, concurrently with the Consistorial Court of the Bishop.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Shakerley
Shakerley
NGR: SD 693 022

A hamlet within the parochial district of Tyldesley in the hundred of west Derby, county palatine of Lancaster. 2.5 miles east-north-east from Leigh. The living (of Tyldesley) is a perpetual curacy in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Chester

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2099 [2075]

Queene Mary. Dyuers preserued by Gods prouidence from burning in Queene Maryes time.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.know they are the people of God, and therefore we cannot choose but wish well to them, and say: God strengthen thē: And so boldly he sayde: MarginaliaMaster Bentham speaketh and prayeth for the Martyrs without daunger.Almighty God for Christes sake strengthen them. With that, all the people with a whole consent and once voice folowed and sayd: Amen, Amē. The noyse whereof was so great, and the criers thereof so many, that the Officers could not tell what to say: nor whom to accuse. And thus much concerning the congregation of the faythfull, assembling together at London in the time of Queene Mary.

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MarginaliaAn other deliuery of Master Bentham out of great perill.The said M. Bentham an other time, as he passed thorow S. Katherines, intending to walke and take the ayre abroad, was enforced by two or three men, approching vpon him, needes to go with them to a place whether they would lead him. M. Bētham astonied at the sodeinnes of the matter, and maruelling what the thing shoulde be, required what theyr purpose was, or whether they woulde haue him. They aunswered, that by the occasion of a man there found drowned, the Crowners quest was called and charged to sit vpon him, of the whiche quest he must of necessity be one. &c. He agayne, loth to medle in the matter, excused himselfe, alledging that in such kind of matters he had no skill, and lesse experience: if it would please them to let him goe, they should meete with other more meete for theyr purpose. But when with this they would not be satisfied, he alledged further, that he was a scholer of Oxford, and thereby was priuiledged from being of any inquest. The Crowner demaunded the sight of his priuiledge. He sayd, if he woulde geue him leaue, he would fetch it. MarginaliaMaster Bentham forced agaynst his will to sit in the Crowners quest.Then sayd the Crowner: the queene must be serued without all delay, & so cōstrayned him notwithstanding to be with thē in hearing the matter.

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Beyng brought to the house where the Crowner and the rest of the quest were sitting, as the maner is, a booke was offered him to sweare vpon. MarginaliaMaster Bentham refuseth to sweare vpon a Popishe Primer.M. Bentham opening the booke, and seing it was a papisticall Primer, refused to sweare thereupon and declared moreouer what superstition in that booke was conteined. What, sayde the Crowner? I thinke we shall haue here an hereticke among vs. And vpon that, after much reasoning amongest them, he was committed to the custody of an officer till further examinatiou: by occasion wherof, to all mens reason, hard it had bene and ineuitable for M. Bentham to haue escaped, had not the Lord helped where man was not able. MarginaliaMeanes wrought wherby Master Benthem escaped.What folowed? Incontinent as they were thus contending and debating about matters of heresye, sodeynly commeth the Crowner of the Admiralty, disanulling and repealing the order & calling of that inquest, for that it was (as he sayde) perteining to his office, and therefore the other Crowner and his company in that place had nothing to do: And so the first Crowner was discharged and displaced: by reasō whereof M. Bentham escaped theyr handes, hauing no more sayd vnto him. 

Commentary  *  Close

An account of Robert Cole's near arrest by Cyriac Petit appeared here in the 1563 edition. It was dropped from the 1570 edition as were other mentions of Cole's heroic resistance in Mary's reign. The reason for this purge was Robert Cole's public support for Matthew Parker's campaign to force clergy to wear the vestments, a campaign which Foxe vigorously opposed. (Cole's actions are described in John Strype, The Life and Acts of the Most Reverend Father in God, Edmund Grindal [Oxford, 1821], pp. 144-45).

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Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 560, line 14 from the bottom

The first Edition (p. 1701) goes on: "To this I might also adjoyne the happy escape of Robert Cole, minister now of Bow in London, from the handes of Maister Petit, Justice in Kent, being hys mortall enemye, and one that soughte his lyfe. Who meeting hym by chaunce, in a narrow lane, not farre from Feversam, and so meeting him, that one of them must needes touche an other, yet so overcame that daunger, that hee was past and gone before the Judge dyd know it was he, and so the sayd Cole escaped."

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English men preserued at the taking of Calice.

MarginaliaEnglish men at Calice preserued.THe worthy workes of the Lordes mercy toward hys people be manifolde and can not be comprehended, so that who is he liuing in the earth almost who hath not experienced the helping hand of the Lord, at some time or other vpon him? Amōgst many other, what a piece of gods tender prouidence was shewed of late vpon our English brethren and country men, what time Calice was takē by the Tyrant Guise, a cruell enemy both to Gods truth and to our English nation? And yet by the gracious prouision of the Lorde, few or none at all, of so many that fauoured Christ and his Gospell, in that terryble spoyle miscaried. In the number of whome there was a godly couple, MarginaliaIohn Thorpe & his wyfe.one Iohn Thorpe and his wife, which feared the Lord, and loued his trueth, who being sicke the same time, and cast out into the wild fieldes, harbourles, desolate, and despayring of all hope of life, hauing theyr young infant moreouer taken from them in the sayd fieldes, and caried awaye of the souldiors: yet the Lord so wrought, that the poore woman being almost past recouery of life, was fet and caried, the space welnigh of a mile, by straungers whome they neuer knewe, into a village, where both shee was recouered for that night, & also the next day comming toward England, they chaunced into the same Inne at the next town, where they found theyr young child sitting by the fire side.

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¶ Edward Benet.

MarginaliaA story of Edward Benet, now dwelling in S. Brides Parishe.ONe Edw. Benet about the second yeare of the reigne of Q. Mary, then dwelling at Quenehieth with one Grynocke a Baker, was desired of one Tyngle prisoner then in Newgate, to bring him a new testament, He pro-

curing one of M. Couerdals translatiō, wrapt it in a hand kerchiefe, saying to George the keeper whiche asked hym what he had, that it was a piece of poudred biefe. Let mee see it, sayd he. Perceiuing what it was, he brought him to Syr Roger Cholmley, who examined him why he did so, saying that booke was not lawfull, & so committed him to the Counter in Woodstreet, wher he continued 25. weekes. MarginaliaEdward Benet 25. weekes in the Counter, for bringing a new Testament to Tyngle, which after dyed in prison, and was buryed on a dounghill.

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Doctor Story comming to the prison to examine other Prisoners, this Benet looking out at the grate, spake to him, desiring him to be good vnto him, and to helpe hym out, for he had lien long in prison. To whom D. Story thē aunswering: MarginaliaD. Storyes wordes to Edward Benet.What, sayd he, wast not thou before me in Christes Church? Yes forsooth, sayd Benet. Ah, sayd Story, thou doest not beleue in the Sacrament of the Aultar. Mary I will helpe thee out: come, sayd he to the keeper, turne him out, I will helpe him: and so tooke Benet wyth him and brought him to Cluney in Pater noster Row, and bade him bring him to the Colehouse, and there he was in the stockes a weeke.

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MarginaliaEdward Benet brought to Boner and examined.Then the Bishoppe sent for him to talke with him, and first asked him if he were shriuen? No, sayd Benet. He asked him if he would be shriuen? No, sayd he. Then he asked him if the Priest could take away his sinnes? No, sayd Benet, I do not so beleue. Then he and Harpsfielde laughed at him and mocked him, asking him if he did not beleue that what so euer the Prieste here bounde in earth, should be bound in heauen: and what so euer he loosed in earth, shoulde be loosed in heauen? No, quoth Benet: But I beleue that the Minister of God preaching Gods word truely, and ministring the Sacramentes accordyng to the same, whatsoeuer he bindeth in earth, shalbe bound in heauen, and what so euer he looseth. &c. Then the Bishop putting him aside, sayd, he should go to Fulham and be whipped.

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Then came to him M. Buswell a Priest, lying in the Colehouse in the stockes, and brought Cranmers recantation, saying that he had recanted. My fayth, sayth the other, lyeth in no mans booke but in him which hath redeemed me. MarginaliaHow Edward Benet escaped out of the Byshops house.The next saterday, Benet with fiue other was called for to come to masse, into the Chappell. The Masse being done and they comming out, fiue of thē went to prison and were after burned. Benet being behind and comming toward the gate, the porter opening to a company goyng out, asked if there were no prisoners there. No, sayd they. Benet standing in open sight before him, with other seruing men whiche were there by reason that Boner made many priestes that day (hauing one of his sleues and halfe the fore part of his coat burned of in prisō, being more like a prisoner then any of the other) when the gate was opened, went out amongest them, and so escaped.

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MarginaliaAn other escape of Edward BenetAgayne, in the last yeare of Queene Mary, the same Benet being taken againe with the 24. beyond Islington, and brought to Syr Roger Cholmleys, the people comming very thicke did cut of some of them, to the number of 8. which were behinde, among whom was Benet. Marginalia8. Of the 24. taken at Islington, escaped and how good warning sent of god.Then he knocking at the gate to come in, the Porter sayd, that he was none of the company. He sayde yes, and knocked agayne. Thē there stood one by of the congregation, named Iohnson, dwelling now at Hamersmith, which sayd: Edward, thou hast done well, do not tempt God, go thy way. And so taking the warning as sent of God, with a quyet conscience eschued burning.

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¶ Ieffrey Hurst brother in law to George Marsh the Martyr.

MarginaliaThe story of Ieffrey Hurst dwelling in the towne of Shakerley in the Parish of Leaght.IN the Towne of Shakerley in Lancashyre dwelled one Ieffrey Hurst the sonne of an honest yeoman, who had besides him 11. children, the sayd Ieffrey being the xij. and eldest of the rest: and for that theyr father being willyng to bring them vp, so that they should be able another day to helpe themselues, he did binde this Ieffrey prentise vnto the craft of nayling, to make all kinde of nayles: which occupation he learned and serued out the time of 7. yeares. The which yeres being expired, he gaue himselfe at times to learne of his other Brethren which went to schole: and as he was very willing to the same, so GOD sent hym knowledge wherein he did perseuer and go forwardes, in such sort that he could write and read indifferently, and in longer continuaunce came by more knowledge, and so hauing the Bible and diuers other bookes in his house, dyd come by pretye knowledge in the Scripture. MarginaliaIeffrey Hurst brother to George Marsh the Martyr.After this he tooke vnto him a wife being the Sister of Maister George Marsh, of whose Martyrdome mention is made before. pag. 1484. and being much familiar with him, did mend his knowledge not a little. Now whē queene Mary was entred, the first yeare of her reigne he kept himselfe awaye from their doings & came not at the church: Wherupon he

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