Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Brent

A justice. Of Kent

Thomas Sprat left his master, Brent, to flee to Calais in fear of persecution. 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

In about 1557 Sprat and Porrege returned to England and were approximately three miles from Dover when they were met by Brent, two Blanchendens and others. One of the party knew Porrege. 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

Brent's servant recognised Sprat and informed his master. 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

Sprat and Porrege were close to being captured when Brent's servant fell from his horse and gave Sprat the chance to run. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

 
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Cannall

Of Colchester.

John Cornet sang a song against the mass for which the parson, Yaxley, had him sent before Justice Cannall. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p.1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

 
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John Cornet

Apprentice musician. Of Colchester.

John Cornet went to sing songs at a wedding in Rough-hedge. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p.1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

He sang a song against the mass for which the parson, Yaxley, had him sent before justice Cannall. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p.1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

Cornet was sent before the earl of Oxford. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p.1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

He was held in chains and finger irons that made the tips of his fingers burst. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p.1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

He was sent to Bonner but later ordered by the earl of Oxford to return to Rough-hedge to be whipped and then banished from the town forever. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p.1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

 
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John de Vere

(d. 1562)

16th earl of Oxford. (DNB)

John de Vere accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

John Hamond, Simon Hamond, Christopher Lyster, John Mace, John Spencer and Richard Nicholas were delivered to John Kingstone, bachelor of civil law, and then commissory to Gardiner, by the earl of Oxford on 28 March 1556. 1563, p. 1517, 1570, p. 2089, 1576, p. 1803, 1583, p. 1909.

John Routh was convented before the earl of Oxford. He was sent to Colchester castle by Lord Rich and then on to Bonner. 1563, p. 1526, 1570, p. 2096., 1576, p. 1808, 1583, p. 1916.

Thomas Hawkes was a member of his household. The earl reported to Bishop Bonner that Hawkes refused to have his son baptized in a catholic service and delivered Hawkes to Bonner�s custody (1563, pp. 1161-62; 1570, p. 1758; 1576, p. 1550 [recte 1502]; 1583, p. 1585).

He denounced six residents of Coggeshall, Essex (William Bamford, Nicholas Chamberlain, Thomas Brodehill, Thomas Osborne and Richard Webbe) to Bishop Bonner on 1 May 1555 (1563, p. 1166;1570, p. 1777; 1576, p. 1518; 1583, pp. 1601-02).

In a letter to Bishop Bonner, John Kingston said that the 'lord of Oxford' was one of the commissioners who confiscated the lands and goods of 22 accused heretics. 1563, p. 1564 [recte 1576].

On 29 August 1557 an indenture was made between several lords and justices and John Kingston concerning the delivery of 22 prisoners from Colchester. De Vere was one of the persecutors named in the indenture. 1563, p. 1565, 1570, p. 2157, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly marked as 1971]

John Cornet was sent before the earl of Oxford, who ordered that he be held in chains and finger irons that made the tips of his fingers burst. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p.1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

Cornet was sent to Bonner but later ordered by the earl of Oxford to return to Rough-hedge to be whipped and then banished from the town forever. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p.1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

 
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Katherine Brandon

Duchess of Suffolk. (DNB)

Latimer preached in Stamford before the Duchess of Suffolk, in London in convocation and in the garden before King Edward at court. 1563, p. 1353, 1570, p. 1908, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1739.

Katherine Brandon was believed by Gardiner to be one of his greatest enemies.1570, p. 2283, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

Gardiner sought revenge against Katherine first through her husband, Richard Bertie, by insisting that the sheriff of Lincolnshire bring Bertie before him. 1570, p. 2283, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

Stampford gave a friendly report of Bertie. 1570, p. 2283, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

Boner urged Bertie to make Katherine repent and then released him of his bond. 1570, p. 2284, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

Katherine was the executor to the former duke of Suffolk's estate. 1570, p. 2284, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

Bertie devised a plan to send Katherine overseas. 1570, p. 2284, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

The emperor Charles V was owed money from the duke of Suffolk's estate. 1570, p. 2284, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

Bertie went overseas before his wife, who followed him shortly afterwards. 1570, p. 2284, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

Robert Cranwell, an elderly gentleman, travelled with Katherine and her daughter and others of her household when they went overseas. 1570, p. 2284, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

Foxe recounts her journey overseas. 1570, p. 2284, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

Gosling, a merchant of London, learned of Katherine Brandon's departure, and he was a friend of Cranwell's. He housed her as Mrs White and her daughter as his own daughter. 1570, p. 2284, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

She arrived in the duke of Cleves' dominion, where Francis Pernsell (Francis de Rivers) was minister. 1570, p. 2285, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

Master Perusell secured the protection of the magistrates for Bertie and Katherine. 1570, p. 2285, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

John Mason warned Bertie and Katherine that Lord Paget was on his way under a false pretence and that the duke of Brunswick was nearby in the service of the house of Austria against the French king. 1570, p. 2285, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

Bertie and Katherine departed for Windsheim, under Palgrave's dominion. 1570, p. 2285, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

The king of Poland offered Katherine Brandon and her husband assistance during their exile, at the request of John a Lasco. 1570, p. 2285, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

They devised with Barlow, former bishop of Chichester, to travel with him. 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

 
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Thomas Brice

(c. 1536 - 1570/1)

Martyrologist. Minister. (ODNB) Ordained priest (1560). Curate of Ramsden, Bellhouse (1560). Rector of the parish of Little Bursted (1561 - 1571).

Thomas Brice was in the house of John Seal, in Horting, when the bailiff and others, at the commandment of Sir John Baker, were sent to search for him. They knew his stature and the colour of his garments yet somehow did not recognise him and so he escaped. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

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He fled Essex for fear of persecution. 1563, p. 1678.

Thomas Brice came home from Wesel with his elder brother John to their father's house and intended to warn Springfield of the danger nearly upon him, when they themselves came close to capture. Servants at an inn allowed them to escape through a secret passage and take a barge out of town. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

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[Author of a compendious register in metre (1559) - a verse martyrology.]

[Brother of John Brice.]

 
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Thomas Horton

(1520 - 1564) (Fines)

Minister. MA (1549). Fellow of King's College, Cambridge (1540 - 1542). Fellow of Pembroke (c. 1548). Prebend of Durham (1560 - 1561). Rector of St Magnus, London (1560 - 1564). Of Catton, Derbyshire. (Venn) Disciple of Bucer. (Fines)

Thomas Horton fled to the Continent to avoid persecution. 1563, p. 1703, 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1973 [incorrectly numbered as 1937], 1583, p. 2081.

He travelled regularly between Germany and England to give sustenance to exiles. 1563, p. 1703, 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

He was taken en route between Maeso and Cologne but managed to be delivered out of danger. 1563, p. 1703, 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

 
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Thomas Sprat

Tanner. Of Kent. Once a servant to Master Brent, a justice.

Thomas Sprat left his master to flee to Calais in fear of persecution. 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

Sprat often returned to England from exile abroad with William Porrege. 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

In about 1557 Sprat and Porrege returned to England and were approximately three miles from Dover when they were met by Brent, two Blanchendens and others. One of the party knew Porrege. 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

Brent's servant recognised Sprat and informed his master. 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

Sprat and Porrege were close to being captured when Brent's servant fell from his horse and gave Sprat the chance to run. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

Porrege was questioned but allowed to depart. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

Sprat ran for about a mile to a wood and managed to escape. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

 
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William Porrege

Rector of St Peters, West Cheap, London.

William Porrege was ordained priest by Grindal and collated by Matthew Parker to the parish of Grimston, Norfolk. [The Letter Book of John Parkhurst, ed. Houlbrooke, p. 115.]

John Bradford wrote a letter to Porrege [W. P. ] 1570, p. 1822, 1576, p. 1558.

Cranmer sent a token via W. P. [William Porrege] to a woman falsely accused of adultery, asking for forgiveness for the treatment she received while in custody. 1563, p. 1478, 1576, p. 1751.

Thomas Sprat often returned to England from exile abroad with William Porrege. 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

In about 1557 Sprat and Porrege returned to England and were approximately three miles from Dover when they were met by Brent, two Blanchendens and others. One of the party knew Porrege. 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

Brent's servant recognised Sprat and informed his master. 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

Sprat and Porrege were close to being captured when Brent's servant fell from his horse and gave Sprat the chance to run. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

Porrege was questioned but allowed to depart. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

Sprat ran for about a mile to a wood and managed to escape. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

 
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Yaxley

Of Colchester.

John Cornet sang a song against the mass for which the parson, Yaxley, had him sent before justice Cannall. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

[Possibly Francis Yaxley (d. 1565), son of Richard Yaxley of Mellis, Suffolk. (DNB).]

 
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Colchester
Colchester, Colchestre
NGR: TM 000 250

A borough, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the Colchester division of the hundred of Lexden, county of Essex. 22 miles north-east by east from Chelmsford. The town comprises the parishes of All Saints, St. James, St. Martin, St. Mary at the Walls, St. Nicholas, St. Peter, St. Rumwald and Holy Trinity within the walls; and St. Botolph, St. Giles, St. Leonard and St. Mary Magdalene without the walls; all in the archdeaconry of Colchester and Diocese of London

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Dover
Douer
NGR: TR 320 414

One of the Cinq Ports, a borough and a market town, having separate jurisdiction; locally in the Lathe of St Augustine, eastern division of the County of Kent. 16 miles south east by south from Canterbury. Dover formerly consisted of the parishes of St James the Apostle, St John, St Martin the Greater, St Martin the Less, St Mary the Virgin, St Nicholas and St Peter - all subsequently merged into St James and St Mary. The living of St Mary is a perpetual curacy in the peculiar jurisdiction of the Archbishop of Canterbury, and in the patronage of the parishioners. The living of St James is a discharged rectory in the jurisdiction and patronage of the Archbishop

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Roughhedge
Roughhedge
NGR:

Unidentified

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Sandwich
NGR: TR 335 584

A Cinque Port, borough and market town having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred ofEastry, lathe of St Augustine, county of Kent. 39 miles east from Maidstone. The town comprise the parishes of St Clement, St Mary the Virgin and St Peter the Apostle, all in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Canterbury. The living of St Clement is a vicarage; the living of St Mary is a discharged vicarage; and the living of St Peter is a discharged rectory.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2105 [2081]

Queene Mary. Dyuers preserued by Gods prouidence from the fire in Queene Maries dayes.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.great quietnesse and honoure, till the deathe of Queene Mary.

¶ Thomas Horton Minister.

MarginaliaA story of Thomas Horton, Minister.AS yee haue heard of the daungerous troubles of the Duchesse of Suffolke in time of her exile for religion sake, whom notwithstanding the Lordes present protection still deliuered in all distresses, as well from her enemies in England, as in Dutchland frō þe Launceknightes there: so haue we no lesse to behold and magnifie the lords mercifull goodnes in preseruing of Thomas Horton frō the like perilles of the same Countrey.

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Whiche Thomas Horton, what a profitable instrument hee was to the Church of Christ in Queene Maries time, all our Englishmen almost beyond the seas then, did both know and feele.

This good Thomas Horton, as he vsed, oftentymes to traualye betweene Germany and England, for the behoofe and sustenaunce of the poore English exiles there: so he iournying vpon a time betweene Mastricke and Collē chaunced to bee taken there by certayne Rouers, and so being led by them away, was in no little daunger: and yet this daunger of his was not so great, but the present helpe of the Lord was greater to ayd and deliuer him out of the same. 

Commentary  *  Close

Accounts of Robert Harrington, Lady Elizabeth Fane, Sir Nicholas Throgmorton and Thomas Musgrave were printed here on p. 1703 in the 1563 edition. The account of Elizabeth Fane was updated and appended to the account of Lady Anne Knevet. The account of Throgmorton was probablydropped because the refusal of a jury to convict him of treason provided a dangerous precedent for the Elizabethan authorities; it is unclear why the accounts Harrington and Musgrave were omitted.

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 576, line 22

The first Edition, p. 1703, proceeds: "Here lykewise might I speake of maister Harington, and also of that worthy and most godly Lady, the Lady Vayne, whose earnest and pythy letters to maister Philpot, and to maister Bradford are yet to be sene, and by the leave of the Lord hereafter shal appear.
"What a singular and memorial spectacle of Gods mercyful clemency was declared in delyveringe syr Nicolas Throgmorton in the same time of Quene Mari: who not so much for other pretensed causes as especiallye for religion was so stratly pursued, so vehemently hated, so mightely assaulted, that being clered ["For this the jury was severely fined." (Rapin, ii. 38.)] by the inquest of xii. men, yet scarslye could be released; concerning the discourse and proces of whiche man, as we have it in our handes to shewe, so for the notablenes of the matter we would here have put it downe, but that the length therof requireth rather an other tyme to performe the same. [Sir Nicholas was a "fautor" of Bishop Jewel. See Humfrey's Life, p. 83.]
"Fynally as there is no difference of persons with the Lord, so many tymes hys provident and merciful help is no less upon the pore and symple, as upon other worthyer and greater personages, as in the same tyme of Quene Mary wel appered in a certen simple and poore creature, named Thomas Musgrave, who after his condemnation beinge caried to Smithfield, there to be burned, yet notwithstanding was saved, and yet is alyve. Such is the secret and unsearchable operation of Gods power, able to deliver whom hee pleaseth in the middest of death and desperation," &c.

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¶ Thomas Sprat of Kent, Tanner

MarginaliaThe story of Thomas Sprat & William Porrege.VNto these afore rehearsed examples of Gods blessed prouidence towardes his seruauntes, may also be added the happy deliueraunce of Thomas Sprat and William Porrege his companion, now Minister. Whose story briefly to course ouer, is this.

This Thomas Sprat had bene seruaunt sometimes to one MarginaliaM. Brent Iustice in Kent, a persecutour.M. Brent a Iustice, and a heauy persecutour, and therefore forsaking his Mayster for religions sake, he wēt to Calice, from whence he vsed often with the sayd William Porrege for theyr necessary affayres, to haue a recourse into England.

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It so happened about the fourthe yeare of Queene Maryes raygne, that they landing vppon a tyme at Douer, and taking theyr iourny together toward Sandwich sodenly vppon the way within three myles of Douer, met with the foresayd M. Brent, MarginaliaThe two Blachendens in Kent, persecutours.the two Blachendens, and other Gentlemen moe, with theyr seruaunts, to the number of x. or xii. horses. Of the which two Blachendens, being both haters and enemies of Gods worde and people, the one had perfect knowledge of William Porrege, the other had not seene him, but onely hadde heard of his name before.

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MarginaliaThomas Sprat almost taken in the way by the Iustice.Thus they being in the way where this Iustice wyth his mates shuld meete them directly in the face, Thomas Sprat first espying M. Brent, was sore dismayde, saying to hys companion: yonder is M. Brent. William Porrege God haue mercy vpon vs. Well quoth the other, seing now there is no remedy, let vs go our waye. And so thinking to passe by them, they kept themselues aloufe, as it were a score off from them, Thomas Sprat also shadowing his face with his cloke.

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Notwithstanding, one of Mr. Brentes seruauntes aduising him better then his mayster did: yonder, sayd he to his Mayster, is Thomas Sprat. At whiche wordes they all rayned theyr horses, and called for Thomas Sprat to come to them. They cal you, sayd William Porrege. Now here is no remedy but we are takē: and so perswaded him to go to them being called, for that there was no escaping from so many horsemen in those playnes and downes, where was no wood neare them by a myle, nor hedge neyther, but onely one, which was a byrdbolt shot off. 

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 577, line 9

A bird-bolt was "an arrow having a ball of wood at the end of it, and sometimes an iron point projecting before the ball, formerly used for shooting at birds." (Todd's Johnson.) See Shakespeare, Love's Labour's Lost, iv. 3.

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MarginaliaThomas Sprat called of the Iustice but would not come.All this notwithstanding, Sprat stayed and woulde not go. Then they called agayne, sitting still on horseback. Ah sirra, quoth the Iustice? why come ye not hether? And still his companion moued him to go, seying there was no other shift to flee away. Nay, sayd Sprat, I will not goe to them, and therwithall tooke hys legges, running to the hedge that was next him. They seeyng that, sette spurres to their horse, thinking by and by to haue hym, and that it was vnpossible for him to escape their hands, as it was in deede, they beyng on horsebacke and he on foote, MarginaliaGod alwayes stronger then the deuill.had not þe Lorde myraculously deliuered his seely seruant frō the gaping mouth of the Lyon ready to deuour him.

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For as God would, so it fell out that hee had got ouer the hedge, skrawling through the bushes, when as they were euen at his heeles, striking at him with theyr swords one of the Blachendens crying cruelly: cut off one of hys legges.

MarginaliaThomas Sprat getteth ouer the hedge from his persecutoss.Thus Sprat had scarsely recouered the hedge from hys enemies, when one of M. Brentes seruaunts, which had bene follow sometymes in house with him, followed him in hys bootes: and certayne rode vp at one side of the hedge, and certayne at the other, to meete him at the vpper end.

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Now while they were following the chase after Thomas Sprat, onely one remayned with William Porrege (who was one of the Blachendens, not he whiche knewe him, but the other) who began to question with hym: not asking what was hys name (as God would( for then hee had bene knowne and taken: but from whence hee came and how he came into Sprats company, and whether he went: Vnto whome he aunswered and sayd: from Calyce and that Sprat came ouer with him in the passage boate, and they two were goyng to Sandwich, and so wythout any more questions he let him depart.

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MarginaliaWilliam Porrege escapeth.Anone as he kept along the hedge, one of the horsemen which rode after Sprat, returning backe, and meeting wt the sayd W. Porrege, demaunded the very same questions as the other had done, to whome he made also the like answere as afore, and so departed, taking an other contrary way from the meeting of the other horsman. And thus W. Porrege escaped.

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MarginaliaThe Lord disposing the way of his seruauntes.Now concerning Thomas Sprat, he being pursued on the one side by horsemen, on the other side by his own fellow, who followed after hym in his bootes, crying: you were as good to tarry, for we will haue you, we will haue you: yet notwithstanding he still kept on his course till at length he came to a steepe downe hil at þe hedge end, downe the which hil he ran from them, for they could not ride downe the hill, but must fetch a great compasse about and so this Thomas Sprat ran almost a mile, and as god would got a Wood.

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MarginaliaThomas Sprat deliuered by Gods helpe from his aduersaryes.By that tyme he came to the Wood, they were euen at hys heeles: but the night drew on, and it began to rayne and so the malice of these persecutors was at an ende, the Lord working for his seruauntes, whose name be praised for euer and euer, Amen.

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Not long after this, one of the two Blauchendens aforesayd, which so cruelly sought the destruction of other, was cruelly murdered by hys owne seruauntes.

¶ Iohn Cornet.

MarginaliaThe troubles of Iohn Cornet, & howe he was deliuered.HEre might also be recited the hard aduētures and sufferinges of Iohn Cornet, and at lengthe his deliueraunce by Gods good working, out of the same.

Who being a prentise with a minstrell at Colchester, was sent by hys mayster about the 2. yeare of Queene Maryes raygne, to a wedding in a towne thereby called Roughhedge, where hee being requested by a companye there of good men, the Constables also of the parish being present thereat, so sing some songes of the scripture, chanced to sing a song called Newes out of London, whiche tended agaynst the Masse, and agaynst the Queenes misproceedinges.

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Whereupon the next day he was accused by the Parson of Roughhedge called MarginaliaYackesley Parson of Roughhedge, persecutour.Yackesley, and so committed, first to the Constable, where both his mayster gaue hym ouer and Marginalia The mother agaynst her own sonne.hys mother forsooke and cursed him. From thence hee was sent to the next Iustice, named M. Cānall: and then to the Earle of Oxford, where he was first put in yrons & chaynes, and after so manacled that the bloude spurt out of hys finger endes, because he woulde not confesse þe names of them which allured hym to sing.

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And marueile it was that the cruell Papistes were so contended, that they sent him not also to Bishop Boner, to suffer the extremitie of the fire. But Gods gracious prouidence disposed otherwise for hys seruaunt. MarginaliaCornet whipped out of the towne, and so banished.For after hee was manacled, the Earle cōmaunded hym to be brought agayne to the towne of Roughhedge, & there to be whipped till the bloud followed, and to be banished the towne for euer: and so hee was, during all the time of Queene Mary.

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¶ Thomas Bryce. 
Commentary  *  Close

Brice would write a doggerel poem on the Marian martyrs which was an important source for Foxe. (See the article on Brice in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography).

 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 578

The author, in all probability, of the "Register" in Farr's "Select Poetry of the Reign of Queen Elizabeth" (Parker Soc.), i. 162.

MarginaliaThomas Bryce preserued.IF our story should proceede so wide and so large, as dyd the exceeding mercy of Gods prouidence in helpyng hys seruauntes out of wretchednes, and thraldome of those bloudy dayes, our treatise, I thinke, would extende to an endlesse processe.

For what good man or woman was there almost in all this tyme of Queene Mary, who eyther in carying a good conscience out of the land, or tarying within þe realm could well escape the Papistes handes, but by some nota-

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