Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Cartwright

Sergeant-at-arms. Of Hadleigh, Suffolk.

Walter Clerk and John Clerk complained to the council about Rose, and the sergeant-at-arms, Cartwright, subsequently arrested Rose. 1576, p. 1978, 1583, p. 2083.

 
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John Clerk

Clothier of Hadleigh; brother of Walter Clerke [See Diarmaid MacCulloch, Suffolk and the Tudors (Oxford, 1986), p. 430 and John Craig, 'Reformers, conflict and revisionism: the Reformation in sixteenth-century Hadleigh', Historical Journal 42 (1999), pp. 17 and 19-20].

Together with William Foster, Clerke arranged to have mass celebrated in the church at Hadleigh after Mary's accession. Rowland Taylor interrupted the service and was forcibly ejected from the church. Some of Taylor's followers broke the windows of the church. Foster and Clerke denounced Taylor to Stephen Gardiner, leading to Taylor's imprisonment 1563, p. 1066-67; 1570, pp. 1693-94; 1576, p. 1446; 1583, p. 1519.

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John Clerk was an enemy of Thomas Rose in Hadleigh and resorted to have him removed. 1576, p. 1978, 1583, p. 2083.

John Clerk and Walter Clerk complained to the council about Rose, and the sergeant-at-arms, Cartwright, subsequently arrested Rose. 1576, p. 1978, 1583, p. 2083.

 
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Walter Clerk

(d. 1554)

Clothier, JP and bailiff of Hadleigh; brother of John Clerke [See Diarmaid MacCulloch, Suffolk and the Tudors (Oxford, 1986), pp. 233 and 430; also see John Craig, 'Reformers, conflict and revisionism: the Reformation in sixteenth-century Hadleigh', Historical Journal 42 (1999), pp. 17 and 19-20].

Walter Clerk was an enemy of Thomas Rose in Hadleigh and resorted to have him removed. 1576, p. 1978, 1583, p. 2083.

Walter Clerk and John Clerk complained to the council about Rose, and the sergeant-at-arms, Cartwright, subsequently arrested Rose. 1576, p. 1978, 1583, p. 2083.

Foxe describes Walter Clerke as 'Gods great enemy'. Robert Bracher, a friend of Walter Clerke, preached catholic doctrine at his funeral. 1570, p. 1703; 1576, p. 1454; 1583, p. 1527.

[Brother of John Clerk. Father-in-law to Sir Roger Appleton.]

 
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Young

Of Rye, Suffolk.

When Thomas Rose was in Dieppe, one Young, of the town of Rye who had heard Thomas Rose preach, paid a ransom to get Rye back home. 1576, p. 1978, 1583, p. 2083.

 
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Attleborough
Attelborough
NGR: TM 045 955

A market town and parish in the hundred of Shropham, county of Norfolk. 15 miles south-west by west from Norwich. There were formerly two parishes, of Attleborough Major and Attleborough Minor, now combined in one rectory in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Norwich.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Bury St. Edmunds
Berry, Burie, Bury, Burye, S. Edmondsbury, Saint Edmundes Bury, Sainte Edmundes Burye, S. Edmunds Bury, S. Edmundsbury
NGR: TL 853 649

A borough and market town, having exclusive jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Thingoe, county of Suffolk. 26.5 miles north-west by north from Ipswich. The monastery at the dissolution was worth £2336 16s. per annum. Bury comprises the parishes of St. Mary and St. James. The living of each is a donative in the patronage of the mayor and corporation.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Dovercourt
Douercorte, Douercourt
NGR: TM 253 310

A parish within the borough of Harwich, 42 miles north-east by east from Chelmsford. The living is a vicarage, with the perpetual curacy of St. Nicholas annexed, in the Archdeaconry of Colchester, diocese of London, and in the patronage of the Crown

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Norwich
NGR: TG 230 070

A city and county of itself, locally in the hundred of Humbleyard, county of Norfolk, of which it is the capital. 108 miles north-east by north from London. The city comprises 33 parishes, and the liberty of the city a further four. Of these 37, three are rectories, 12 are discharged rectories, three are vicarages, one is a discharged vicarage, and 18 are perpetual curacies. St Andrew, St Helen, St James, St Paul and Lakenham are within the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter; the rest are in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Norwich, of which the city is the seat.

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Further information:

Andrews church (now St Andrews Hall) is at the junction of St Andrews Street and Elm Hill.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Rye
Rie, Rye, [Ryd]
NGR: TQ 920 206

A Cinq Port, borough and parish, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Gostrow, rape of Hastings, county of Sussex. 76 miles south-east by east from Chichester, 63 miles south-east by east from London. The living is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Lewes, Diocese of Chichester.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Stratford, near Hadleigh
Stratford, near Hadley
NGR:

Unidentified

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
York
NGR: SE 603 523

A city and county of itself, having exclusive jurisdiction; locally in the East Riding of the county of York, of which it is the capital. 198 miles north-north-west from London. The city is the seat of the Archbishop, and comprised originally 33 parishes, reduced by amalgamation to 22; of which 33, 17 were discharged rectories, 10 discharged vicarages, and 6 perpetual curacies; all within the diocese of York.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2107 [2083]

Queene Mary. The troubles and examinations of Thomas Rose persecuted for the Gospell.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.then brought to preach agaynst the sayd Thomas Rose, & so did. This notwithstanding he continued still very vehement agaynst Images, & the Lorde so blessed his labours that many began to deuise how to deface and destroy them and especially foure men, whose names were Ro. King, R. Debnam, N. Marsh, and R, Gardener, which vsually resorted to his sermons & vpō his preaching were so inflamed with zeale, that shortly after they aduentured to destroy the Roode of Douercourt, which coste three of them theyr liues, as appeareth before pag. 1031. MarginaliaThree offered to haue their liues saued to accuse Tho. Rose, but would not.The three persons which suffered, and were hanged in chaynes, wer offered theyr liues, to haue accused the sayd Thomas Rose, as of counsell with them, which refused so to do, and therfore suffered. The sayd Tho. Rose had the coat of the sayd Roode brought vnto him afterward, who burned it. The Roode was sayde to haue done many great myracles and great wonders wrought by him, and yet being in the fire could not help him selfe, but burned like a block, as in very deede he was.

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At this time there were two sore enemies in Hadley, Walter Clerke, and Iohn Clerke, two brethren, 

Commentary  *  Close

The Clarke brothers were zealous catholic residents of Hadleigh (Suffolk) who had been largely responsible for Rowland Taylor's arrest. (See John Craig, 'Reformers, Conflict and Revisionism: The Reformation in Sixteenth-century Hadleigh', Historical Journal 42 [1999], pp. 17 and 19-20).

these cōplayned to the Counsayle, that an hundred men were not able to fetch the sayde Thomas Rose out of Hadley, who then was vpon examination of his doctrine, committed to the Commissaries keeping. And in deede such was þe zeale of a number towardes the truth thē in that towne, þt they were much offended, that their Minister was so taken frō them, and had therefore by force fet him from the Commissary, if certain wise men hadde not otherwise perswaded, which at length also with more quiet did set him in his office agayne, which thing so angred þe two brethren, Walter Clerke & Ioh. Clerk, that they complayned to þe counsaile, as aforesayd, MarginaliaThomas Rose arested by a Sergeant at Armes.wherupon a serieant at armes named Cartwright, was sent from the counsayle, who arested the sayd Thomas Rose, & brought him before the counsayle. Then his aduersaries being called, they layd to his charge, þt hee was priuy of the burning of the Rood of Douercourt, and vpon this he was committed to the prison in the Bish. of Lincolns house in Holborne, Bishop Langly  
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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 582, line 11

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'Langly' to 'Longland' in the text.} For "Longland," the original text erroneously reads "Longley."

the kinges Confessor, and there remayned he in prison, frō Shroftide tyll Mydsomer very sore stocked tyll after Easter.

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MarginaliaThe cruel handling of Thomas Rose by the Papistes.The stocks were very hye, & great, so that day & night he did lye with his backe on the ground, vpon a litle straw with his heeles so hye, þt by meanes the bloud was fallen from his feete, his feet wer almost without sense for a long time, & he herewith waxed very sicke, in so much that hys keeper pittying his estate, and hearing him cry sometyme thorow the extremetie of payne, went to the bishop, & told him that he would not keepe him to dye vnder his hand, & vpon this he had some more ease & libertie. Now at thys time his mother was come frō Hadley to see him, but she might not be suffered to speake wt the saide Tho. Rose her son (such was their cruelty) but the B. flattered her, & gaue her a payre of pardon beades, & bade her go home & pray, for she might not see him, which thing pierced þe harts both of þe mother & sonne not a litle. At this time also certain mē of Hadley, very desirous to see him, trauayled to speake wt him, but might not be suffered, til at length they gaue the keeper 4. s. & yet then might not speake to him, or see hym otherwise then through a grate. And thus continued he til midsomer in prison there. MarginaliaThomas Rose set at libertye by Doctour Cranmers meanes.Then was he remoued to Lambeth, in the first yeare of D. Cran. consecration, who vsed him much more courteously then euer the B. of Lincolne did, & at length worked his deliuerance, & set him at liberty: but yet so, that he was bounden not to come within xx. myles of Hadley. After this he came to London, and there preached the gospell halfe a yeare, till Hadley men hearing therof, labored to haue him to Hadley agayn, & in deed by meanes of sir Iohn Rainsford knight, obtained at þe Arch bishops hād to haue him thither: howbeit, by meanes one was placed in þe cure at Hadley, he could not enioy his office again there, but went to Stratford three miles off, and ther cōtinued in preaching þe word 3. yeares til at lengthe the aduersaries procured an inhibition from the Bysh. of Norwiche, to put him to silence. But a great number trauayled to haue him continue in preaching, & subscribed a supplication to þe archb. with seuē score hands, who vnder their seales also testified of his honest demeanor, so that the aduersaries this way preuayling not, they indicted him at Bury in Suffolk, so that he was constrayned to flee to lōdon, & to vse þe aid of the L. Audly, then Lord Chauncellor who remoued the matter from thē, & called it before hym & after certain examination of the matter, did set him free & did send him by a token to the Lord Crōwell then L. pryuie Seale, for a licence frō the king, to preach, which being obteyned by the L. Cromwell his meanes (who hereupon also had admitted the sayd Thomas Rose his chaplayne) forthwith he was sent to Lincolnshyre and to Yorke. In

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MarginaliaTho. Rose Chaplaine to the Lord Cromwell.the meane time such complaynt was made to the Duke of Northfolke, for that he had preached against auricular cōfession, transubstantiation, & such other poyntes conteined in the 6. articles (whiche then to haue done, by lawe was death) that the Duke in his owne person not onely sought him at Norwich, but also beset al the hauens for him, from Yarmouth to Londō, & being Lieuetenant, cōmaunded, þt who soeuer could take þe sayd T. Rose, should hang him on þe next tree. Howbeit the sayd Tho. Rose at hys commyng home, hauing warning hereof by certayne godly persons was conueyed away, & passed ouer to Flanders, and so to Germany vnto Zuricke, where a tyme he remayned with M. Bullinger, & afterward went to Basill, & there hosted wt M. Grineus, till letters came that M. Doct. Barnes shuld be B. of Norwiche,  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 583, line 18

Richard Nix, having been Bishop of Norwich ever since 1501, died Jan. 14th, 1536; and William Rugg was elected his successor May 31st following, consecrated July 2nd. (Richardson's Godwin.) This will help to fix the date of this portion of Rose's History.

& things shuld be reformed, & he restored. But whē he came ouer into Eng. againe it was nothing so, & therfore forthwith fled agayne beyond þe seas being so beset, MarginaliaThe mighty prouidence of God in preseruing Tho. Rose from his enemyes.as if the mighty prouidence of God had not sent him in readines to receaue him, þe self same man, bote and boy, þt before caryed him ouer, it had not bene possible for him to haue escaped. But such was the goodnes of god towards him, that he safely was conueyed, & liued at Barow the space of 3. yeares, til at length purposing to come ouer into Englād, about busines that he had, he, his wife, & their chyld being but a yeare & three quarters old, vpō þe sea, the ship being in great danger, wherin they sayled (for the mast being hewn downe in that perill, they wer caried whither soeuer the waues tossed them) they with dyuers others made a full accompt of death. Howbeit, at lengthe they wer taken prisoners, & caryed into Deepe in France hauing al their stuffe takē frō them, & xl. li. in mony. There they remayned prisoners frō Michaelmas til Hallowtide in great heauines, not knowing what woulde become of thē, but depending onely vpon Gods prouidēce, it pleased God at the same time, that one M. Young of the towne of Rye (who had heard hym preach before) came thither for þe redeeming of certayne English men there takē prisoners. This M. Young moued to see them in this case, muche pitied them, & comforted them, and told them hee would pay their ransome, & so he did, had them away, & brought them to Rye, & from thence by stealth came they to London. MarginaliaTho. Rose agayne deliuered.At length the honourable Earle of Sussex hearing of the said Tho. Rose, sent for him, his wife, & his childe, & had them to his house at Attelborough, where they continued, til at length it was blased abroade, that the Earle was a mainteiner of such a man to reade in his house, as had preached against the Catholicke fayth (as they terme it.) TheEarle being at the parlament, & hearing thereof, wrote a letter to warne him to make shift for himselfe, & to auoyd. So that frō thence he passed to London, making strayt shiftes for a yeare there & somewhat more, til the death of king Henry. After the kinges death, he & others which in the kings general pardon were excepted (& therefore dead men, if they had bene taken whilest king Henry liued) by certaine of þe Coūsayle were let at liberty, & at length, after K. Edward was crowned, were licensed to preach againe by the king, who gaue vnto þe said Tho. Rose, the benefice of Westham by London. But at the death of that vertuous and noble prince, he was depriued of al, & so should also haue bene of his life, had not God appointed him friends, who receiued him in London secretly, as their teacher in the congregation, amongest whom for the pore prisoners at their assēblies. x. li. a night oftentymes was gathered. And thus he continued amongest them, & with the Lady Vane almost a yeare, in the raigne of Q. Mary. But although he oftentymes escaped secretly whilst he read to þe godly in sundry places of London, MarginaliaTho. Rose apprehended.yet at length through a Iudas that betrayed them, he with .xxv. that were with him, were takē in Bowchurchyard at a Shiermans house on Newyeres day at night being Tuesday. The residue being cōmitted to prisons, the sayd Tho. Rose was had to the B. of Winchester Ste. Gardiner, but the Bishop would not speeke with him that night, but committed him to the Clinke tyl Tuesday after. 
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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 584, note 1

"Tuesday," in the text, is the reading in all the Editions, also "Thursday" three lines lower: as "Tuesday" is mentioned three lines above, it would seem probable that "Tuesday" here is a mistake for "Thursday."

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The first examination of Thomas Rose before Winchester at saint Mary Oueryes.

MarginaliaThe 1. examination of Tho. Rose.ON Thursday being brought before the B. of Winchester at S. Mary Oueries, the said Tho. Rose spake as followeth.

Rose. It maketh me to maruayle (my Lord, quoth he) that I should be thus troubled for that which by the worde of God hath bene established, & by the lawes of this Realme allowed, & by your own writing so notably in your booke De vera obedientia, confirmed.

Bysh. Ah sirha, hast thou gotten that?

Rose.
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