Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Doddes

Of Mimms, Hertfordshire.

Elizabeth stayed at Doddes' house on her way to the Tower. 1563, p. 1712, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

 
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Edward Courtenay

(1526? - 1556)

Earl of Devon (DNB)

As a child, Courtenay had been imprisoned in the Tower because of the treason of his father, under Henry VIII, but he was released on Mary's entry into London. She made him earl of Devon, and it was widely rumored that she would marry him. He went to Italy after his release in 1555, and died in Venice in 1556 (1570, p. 1579; 1576, p 1347; and 1583, p. 1417).

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Suspected of involvement in Wyatt's rebellion, Courtenay was committed to the Tower in March 1554, together with Elizabeth who was also suspected of the same crime (1563, p. 927; 1570, p. 1587; 1576, p. 1355; and 1583, p. 1425).

It was reported to Sir Thomas White, Lord Mayor of London, that Sir Thomas Wyatt, on the day of his execution, asked the lieutenant of the Tower, Lord Chandos, for an interview with Edward Courtenay. Wyatt begged Courtenay's forgiveness for having falsely accused Elizabeth and him of complicity in his treason (1570, p. 1587; 1576, p. 1355; and 1583, p. 1425). Sir Martin Bowes, the recorder for London, told White that he had heard that Wyatt begged Courtenay to confess the truth (1570, pp. 1587-88; 1576, p. 1355; and 1583, p. 1425).

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At the trial in the Star Chamber of an apprentice named Cut who was charged with sedition for stating that Wyatt had cleared Elizabeth, Stephen Gardiner accused Elizabeth and Courtenay (neither was present) of treason. Gardiner also castigated Courtenay for his ingratitude to the monarch who had released him from prison (1570, p. 1588; 1576, p 1355; and 1583, p. 1425). On this occasion Sir John Brydges, the lieutenant of the Tower, declared that he was present at Wyatt's interview with Courtenay and that Wyatt had urged Courtenay to confess his guilt (1570, p. 1588; 1576, p 1355; and 1583, p. 1425).

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Courtenay accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; and 1583, p. 1466).

Foxe relates another version of the story in which Sir Thomas Wyatt at his execution cleared Elizabeth and Courtenay of involvement in his rebellion. In this version, Hugh Weston told Wyatt that he had said the opposite to the privy council and Wyatt retorted that what he said now was the truth (1570, p. 1639; 1576, p 1399; and 1583, p. 1469).

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Edward Courteney was imprisoned in the Tower under suspicion of being involved in Wyatt's uprising. 1563, p. 1713, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2092.

Chandos interrogated a young boy who was believed to be carrying messages between Elizabeth and Edward Courteney during their imprisonment in the Tower. He ordered the boy not to see Elizabeth. 1563, p. 1713, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2092.

 
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George Owen

(d. 1558)

Physician. (DNB)

George Owen called to see if Elizabeth was too ill to be removed from Ashbridge. 1563, p. 1711, 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

 
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Sir Edward Hastings

(by 1519 - 1573)

Lord Hastings of Loughborough. MP for Leicester (1547, 1552), Leicestshire (1547, 1553), Middlesex (1533, 1554, 1555). Sheriff of Leicestershire and Middlesex (1550), town clerk of Leicester (1553), bailiff (1553 - 1554). JP Middlesex (1554 - 1558/9), Leicestershire (1558/9). (DNB; Bindoff; Cockayne) Master of the Horse (DNB)

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Sir Edward Hastings was sent to bring Princess Elizabeth to London on 11 February 1554 (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1467).

He was sent as an ambassador, 'I knowe not wither', but it was believed to escort Cardinal Pole to England (1570, p. 1645; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, pp. 1473-74).

After Wyatt's rebellion, Hastings went to see Elizabeth at Ashridge and found her to be unwell. 1563, p. 1711, 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

On 15 December 1557 a letter was sent by the archbishop of York, the earl of Shrewsbury, Edward Hastings, Anthony Montague, John Bourne and Henry Jernegam (members of the privy council) to Bishop Bonner along with the examinations of John Rough. They sent Rough to Newgate. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2226, 1576, pp. 1921-22., 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

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Sentence against six martyred at Brentford was read by Darbyshire in the presence of Edward Hastings and Thomas Cornwallis. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2241, 1576, p. 1935, 1583, p. 2039.

[Confined to Baynard Castle in 1561 and later sent to the Tower for hearing mass. Recanted and took the oath of supremacy and was released. Retired to Buckinghamshire.]

 
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Sir John Gage

(1479 - 1556)

Statesman and military commander. MP Sussex (1529, 1539). Lord Chamberlain (1553 - 1556); privy councillor (DNB; Bindoff)

John Gage was one of the privy councillors who signed a letter to Bishop Bonner, dated 28 April 1555, ordering the bishop to proceed posthumously against John Tooley in ecclesiastical court. 1563, p. 1142; 1570, p. 1757; 1576, p. 1500; 1583, p. 1584.

Sir John Gage was an attendant to Elizabeth when she was brought to London under suspicion of involvement in Wyatt's rebellion. 1563, p. 1712, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

He was appointed to go with Elizabeth after her release. 1563, p. 1712, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

[Married the daughter of Sir Richard Guildford of Cranbrook. Father of James and Edward Gage.]

 
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Sir Rafe Rowlet

JP for Hertfordshire. (CSPD)

Elizabeth stayed at Sir Rafe Rowlet's house in St Alban's after leaving Ashbridge. 1563, p. 1712, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

 
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Sir Richard Southwell

(1504 - 1564)

Master of the Ordinance; elder brother of Sir Robert Southwell. Courtier and official. (DNB)

Sir Richard Southwell was a signatory to a letter from the privy council to Bishop Bonner, dated 27 November 1554, informing him that Queen Mary was pregnant and ordering him to have prayers and Te Deums said throughout his diocese (1563, pp. 1014-15; 1570, p. 1647; 1576, p. 1405; 1583, pp. 1475-75).

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Southwell was one of the examiners of John Rogers on 22 January 1555. 1563, pp. 1023-26; 1570, pp. 1657-59; 1576, pp. 1414-15; 1583, pp. 1484-86.

He was present at John Rogers' execution on 4 February 1555. 1570, p. 1664; 1576, p. 1420; 1583, p. 1493.

He was one of the commissioners who interrogated Robert Ferrar on 4 February 1555. 1563, p. 1732; 1570, pp. 1722-23; 1576, p. 1471; 1583, pp. 1553-54.

Richard Southwell was one of the privy councillors who signed a letter to Bishop Bonner, dated 28 April 1555, ordering the bishop to proceed posthumously against John Tooley in ecclesiastical court. 1563, p. 1142; 1570, p. 1757; 1576, p. 1500; 1583, p. 1584.

Bradford was brought to speak to Bonner by the under-marshal of the King's Bench. Talk took place between the lord chancellor, Bonner and John Bradford on 22 January 1555, during which the bishop of Durham, Sir Richard Southwell, Sir Robert Rochester, and Secretary Bourne questioned Bradford's eucharistic doctrine. 1563, pp. 1185-88, 1570, pp. 1782-84, 1576, pp. 1522-23, 1583, pp. 1605-06.

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A declaration was made at Paul's Cross by William Chedsey at Bonner's commandment. He mentioned two letters, one from the queen and another from the privy council. The council letter was about procession and prayer at the agreement of peace between England and France. The signatories were: Francis Shrewsbury, Penbroke, Thomas Cheyny, William Peter, Thomas Wharton and Richard Southwell. Foxe suggests that he had seen the letter. 1563, p. 1217.

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He sent a letter to Bishop Bonner about William Andrew. 1563, p. 1271, 1570, p. 1878, 1576, p. 1608, 1583, pp. 1702-03.

Robert Farrer's examination took place before the bishops of Durham and Worcester, Sir Robert Rochester, Sir Richard Southwell and Gilbert Bourne. 1563, p. 1732, 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2136.

After Wyatt's rebellion, Southwell went to see Elizabeth at Ashridge and found her to be unwell. 1563, p. 1711, 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

 
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Sir Thomas Cornwallis

(1518/19 - 1604)

MP [1547, 1553, 1554, 1558], Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk (1552 - 1530, Comptroller of the Royal Household (1557 - 1558). (DNB; Bindoff

On 15 April 1555, Cornwallis was ordered by the Privy Council to interrogate William Flower and also to have Bishop Bonner and the Middlesex JPs initiate both religious and secular proceedings against William Flower. 1583, p. 1561.

Sentence against six martyred at Brentford was read by Darbyshire in the presence of Sir Edward Hastings and Sir Thomas Cornwallis. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2241, 1576, p. 1935, 1583, p. 2039.

The sheriff, Sir Thomas Cornwallis, made a bill against William Brown. 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

After Wyatt's rebellion, he went to see Elizabeth at Ashridge and found her to be unwell. 1563, p. 1711, 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

Foxe refers to his repair to London out of Essex with Clinton and others. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

[A recusant in Elizabeth's reign (Bindoff).]

 
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Sir Thomas Wyatt

(1521? - 1554) (DNB)

Sir Thomas Wyatt was the king's ambassador to the emperor before Sir Henry Knyvet. Wyatt's servant William Wolfe was taken on by Knyvet as steward of his household. 1583, p. 1786.

In 1554 Sir Thomas Wyatt led a rebellion in Kent against Mary, provoked by fear that Mary's marriage to Philip would 'bring upon this Realme most miserable and establish popish religion'. The duke of Norfolk was sent against Wyatt but Norfolk's followers deserted and he retreated.

Wyatt advanced on London in February 1554. Wyatt could not gain entry into London and was resisted and apprehended at the Temple Bar. Wyatt was executed. Foxe promises to relate a story about the removal of Wyatt's head from the spike on Hay Hill where it was displayed, but he never did (1563, pp. 916-17; 1570, pp. 1579-80; 1576, pp. 1347-48; and 1583, pp. 1418-19).

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In 1570 et seq. Foxe prints an account of Mary's oration - there is an earlier, different version of this speech in 1563, pp. 1730-31 - at the London Guildhall denouncing Wyatt. Foxe's marginal notes to this speech, in 1570 et seq., defend Wyatt against Mary's charge that Wyatt looted Southwark (1570, p. 1580; 1576, p. 1348; and 1583, p. 1418).

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Foxe states that Wyatt, at his own request, spoke with Edward Courtenay on the day of his execution and, before the Lieutenant of the Tower, got down on his knees and begged forgiveness of Courtenay for having falsely accused both him and Elizabeth of involvement in his rebellion (1570, p. 1587; 1576, p. 1355; 1583, p. 1425). [It is reported elsewhere that Wyatt did speak with Courtenay on the day of his execution, but what they said is not known; see J. G. Nichols, (ed.), The Chronicle of Queen Jane and of two years of Queen Mary, (London, 1850) Camden Society Original series 48, pp. 72-73].

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Wyatt also allegedly proclaimed from the scaffold that Elizabeth and Courtenay were innocent of any complicity in his crimes, but Hugh Weston who was also standing on the scaffold cried out to the crowd that Wyatt had confessed otherwise to the Privy Council (1570, p. 1587; 1576, p. 1355; and 1583, p. 1425).

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Sir Martin Bowes informed Sir Thomas White that he had heard a report circulating at Westminster, that Wyatt had urged Courtenay to confess the truth (1570, pp. 1587- 88; 1576, p. 1355; and 1583, p. 1425).

During the Star Chamber trial of one Cut, who was charged with sedition for claiming that Wyatt (on the scaffold) had cleared Elizabeth and Courtenay of any complicity in his rebellion, Sir John Brydges, who was present at Wyatt's interview with Courtenay, claimed that Wyatt begged Courtenay to confess the truth and seek the Queen's mercy (1570, p. 1588; 1576, p. 1355; and 1583, pp. 1425-26).

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Foxe declares that he will pass over Wyatt's rebellion, as it has been dealt with in more detail elsewhere (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1467).

The execution of Wyatt on 11 April, and his statement that neither Elizabeth or Courtenay were involved in his conspiracy (1563, p. 1001; 1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1467).

Elizabeth was suspected of being involved in Wyatt's rebellion. 1563, p. 1711, 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

 
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Sir William St Loe

(1518? - 1565?)

MP for Somerset (1559), Derbyshire (1563). Keeper of the horse to Edward VI (1553). Gentleman attendant to princess Elizabeth; captain of the guard by 1558; chief butler, England and Wales (1559); JP Somerset (from 1559), Derbyshire (from 1561). (Hasler)

St Loe employed John Hooper briefly, c 1539. 1570, p. 1675; 1576, p. 1429; 1583, p. 1503.

One of Elizabeth's gentlemen, he was committed to Queen Mary's Master of the Horse as a prisoner (1570, p. 1638; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1468).

He was released from the Tower on 18 January 1555 (1570, p. 1655; 1576, p. 1412; 1583, p. 1482).

[Foxe does not say so, but St Loe had been arrested and eventually sent to the Tower accused of being the link between Elizabeth and Wyatt (Hasler, Commons)].

Sir William St Loe was called before the privy council at around the same time as Elizabeth was imprisoned in the Tower. 1563, p. 1712, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

[Also referred to as 'Sir William Sentlow']

 
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Thomas Wendy

(1500? - 1560)

Court physician. (DNB)

Thomas Wendy called to see if Elizabeth was too ill to be removed from Ashbridge. 1563, p. 1711, 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

 
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Ashridge [Ashryge] Monastery

Berkhamsted, Herefordshire

OS grid ref: SP 970 131

 
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Redbourn
Redborne, Redbourne
NGR: TL 110 123

A parish in the hundred of Cashio, or Liberty of St. Albans, county of Hertford. 17 miles west from Hertford. The living is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry of St. Albans, Diocese of London

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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South Mimms
Mimmes, Mymmes
NGR: TL 223 012

Not identified, suggest:

South Mimms

A parish in the hundred of Dacorum, although locally in that of Cashio, or Liberty of St. Albans, county of Hertford. 4 miles south-south-west from Bishop's Hatfield. The living is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Huntingdon, Diocese of Lincoln.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2115 [2091]

Queene Mary. Gods prouidence in preseruing Lady Elizabeth in Queene Maries tyme.
MarginaliaAnno 1558.The myraculous preseruation of Lady Elizabeth, nowe Queene of England, from extreme calamitie and danger of life, in the time of Q. Marie her sister. 
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Miraculously Preserved and Preservation of Elizabeth

The irregular pagination of this account of Elizabeth in the 1563 edition suggests that it was a late addition to the volume. The 1563 narrative of Elizabeth began with a pæan to Elizabeth's virtues, much of which was drawn from John Aylmer's Harborow for faithfull and trewe subiectes (London: 1559). Foxe then proceeded with a detailed account of Elizabeth's arrest, imprisonment in the Tower and confinement at Woodstock. This narrative was based on material from a variety of individual informants (for these informants see Thomas S. Freeman, 'Providence and Presecription: The Account of Elizabeth in Foxe's "Book of Martyrs"' in The Myth of Elizabeth, ed. Susan Doran and Thomas S. Freeman [Basingstoke, 2003], pp. 33-35). In the 1570 edition, Foxe eliminated the praise of Elizabeth's virtues but added anecdotes about Elizabeth's imprisonment drawn from witnesses to these events (see Freeman, 'Providence and Prescription,' pp. 36-37 and Thomas S. Freeman, '"As True a Subiect being Prysoner": John Foxe's Notes on the Imprisonment of Princess Elizabeth, 1554-55', English Historical Review 117 (2002), pp. 104-16). One anecdote was added in 1576; apart from this there were no further changes made to the 1570 account in subsequent editions.

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MarginaliaThe blessed protection of almighty God in preseruing the Lady Elizabeth in her manifold daungers and troubles.BVt when all hath beene sayde and tolde, what soeuer canne be recited touching the admyrable woorking of Gods present hande in defending and deliuering any one person oute of thraldome, neuer was there since the memorie of oure fathers, any example to be shewed, wherein the Lordes mightye power hathe more admirably & blessedly shewed it selfe, to the glory of his owne name, to the comforte of all good heartes, and to the publicke felicitie of thys whole Realme, then in the myraculous custodie and outscape of this our soueraigne Lady, now Queene, then Ladye Elizabeth, in the straighte time of Queene Marye her sister.

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MarginaliaThe troubles of Lady Elizabeth in Queene Maryes tyme.In which Storie, first we haue to consider in what extreme miserie, sicknes, feare, and pearil her highnes was: into what care, what trouble of minde, and what danger of death shee was brought. Firste 

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Much of the next few passages is an unacknowledged quotation from John Aylmer, An harborow for faithfull and trewe subiectes (London: 1559), STC 1005,sig. N3v.

with great routes and bands of armed men (and happie was he that might haue the carying of her) being fetched vp as the greatest traytour in the world, clapped in the Tower, and againe tossed from thence, from house to house, from prison to prison, from post to piller, at length also prisoner in her own house, and garded with a sort of cutte throtes, whych euer gaped for the spoyle, whereby they might be fingering of somewhat.

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Secondly, to consider againe we haue, all thys notwtstanding, howe straungely, or rather myraculously from daunger shee was deliuered: what fauour and grace shee founde with the almightye, who when all helpe of man, and hope of recouerie was past, stretched out his mighty protection, and preserued her highnesse, and placed her in this Princely seate of rest and quietnesse, wherein nowe shee sitteth, and long may shee sit, the Lorde of his glorious mercy graunt, we beseeche him.

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In which storie, if I should sette foorth at large and at full, all the particulars and circumstances thereunto belonging, and as iust occasion of the historie requireth, besides the importunate length of the storie discoursed, peraduenture it might mooue offence to some being yet aliue, and truth might gette me hatred. Yet notwithstanding I intend (by the grace of Christ) therein to vse suche breuitie and moderation, as both may be to the glorye of God, the discharge of the storie, the profite of the Reader, and hurte to none, suppressing the names of some, whome heere although I could recite, yet I thought not to be more cruell in hurting them name, then the Queene hath bene mercifull in pardoning their liues.

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MarginaliaThe history of the Lady Elizabeth.Therefore now to enter into the discourse of thys tragical matter, first here is to be noted, that Queene Marye when 

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This anecdote appears as a note in Foxe's handwriting in Foxe's papers: BL, Harley MS 419, fo. 137v. This anecdote first appeared in the 1570 edition.

shee was first Queene, before shee was crowned, would goe no whither, but would haue her by the hande, and send for her to dinner and supper: but after shee was crowned, shee neuer dined nor supped wyth her, but kept her aloofe from her. &c. After this it happened, immediatly vpon the rising of sir Thomas Wiat (as before was mentioned, pag. 1418. 1419.)  
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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 606, line 5

The ensuing account of Elizabeth's apprehension and imprisonment in the Tower is not quite accurate: Foxe, however, himself supplies what is defective in other places of his work. The following are the outlines of what occurred:-
Wyat rose January 25th, 1554: next day Mary wrote to Elizabeth to come to court for her own safety's sake. Elizabeth sent word she was most desirous to come, but begged three or four days' indulgence on account of illness. Her gentlemen afterwards wrote to state her illness and exculpate themselves. (See both Letters in Strype's Memorials, Mary). Wyat removed towards London January 31st, on which Mary went to Guildhall in much excitement, and addressed the citizens, February 1st; after which she left Lord High Admiral Howard and the Lord Treasurer to aid the mayor in resisting Wyat. She then sent commissioners to fetch Elizabeth, no doubt partly at the suggestion of Gardiner, who was with her at Guildhall: who stated it was "the Queen's pleasure that she should be in London the seventh day of that present month." Foxe, however, is wrong in stating here, that these commissioners fetched Elizabeth away the next morning; for he elsewhere states that another commission was sent, viz. Lord Howard, and Sir Edward Hastings, on Saturday, February 11th, who relate their arrival at Ashridge in a letter to Mary of that day, enclosing a plan of their intended journey to town the following week. Foxe on the next page gives a plan closely resembling that. Under this arrangement Elizabeth would have arrived in town on Friday, February 16th, when (according to Foxe, she was shut up in privacy for a "fortnight, till Palm-Sunday," which fell on March 18th, i. e. thirty days after her arrival. The truth is, that plan evidently was not adhered to, in consequence of Elizabeth's illness; and she did not reach town till Thursday, February 22d. (Carte, Cotton MSS. F. 5, and Noaille's Letter to the French king, dated the following Saturday.) Three weeks (not "a fortnight," as Foxe says) from this time, or on Friday, March 16th, Gardiner paid his visit; and on Palm-Sunday, March 18th, she went to the Tower. (Cottom MSS. Vitell. F. 5)

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that the Ladye Elizabeth and the Lord Courtney were charged with false suspition of Syr Thomas Wyates rising. Whereuppon Queene Marye, whether for that surmise, or for what other cause I know not, being offended with the sayde Elizabeth her sister, at that time lying in her house as Ashridge, the next day after the rising of Wyat, MarginaliaSir Richard Southwell, Syr Edward Hastinges, and Syr Thomas Cornwalles sent to fetch vp Lady Elizabeth, with whom also afterward was sent the Lord William Haward. &c.sent to her three of her Counsailours, to wit, Sir Richard Sowthwel, syr Edwarde Hastings, then maister of the horse, and Syr Thomas Cornwalles, with their retinue and troupe of horsemen, to the number of 200. and 50. Who at their sodaine and vnprouided comming, founde her at the same time sore sicke in her bedde, and very feeble & weake of body. Whither whē they came, ascending vp to her graces priuie Chamber, they willed one of her Ladies, whome they mette, to declare vnto her grace, that there were certain come from the court, which had a message from the Queene.

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Her grace hauing knowledge therof, was right glad of their comming: howbeit being then very sicke, and the night farre spent (which was at 10. of the clock) she reque-

sted them by the messenger, that they would resort thither in the morning. To this they answeared, and by the sayde messenger sent woorde againe, that they must needes see her, and would so do, in what case soeuer she were. Wherat the Lady being against, went to shewe her grace theyr woordes: but they hastely folowing her, came rushing as soone as shee into her graces chamber vnbidden.

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MarginaliaThe vnmanerlines of the knights.At whose so sodaine comming into her bed chamber, her grace being not a litle amased, sayd vnto them: Is the hast suche, that it myghte not haue pleased you to come to morrow in the morning?

They made answere, that they were righte sorye to see her in that case. And I (quoth shee) am not glad to see you here at this time of the night. Whereunto they answered, that they came from the Queene to doe their message and duetie: which was to this effecte, that the Queenes pleasure was, that she shoulde be at London the 7. day of that present moneth. Whereunto shee sayde: Certesse, no creature more glad then I to come to her maiestie, being right sorie that I am not in case at this time to waite on her, as you your selues doe see and can well testifie.

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In deede we see it true (quoth they) that you doe say: for which we are very sorie. Albeit we lette you to vnderstande, that our Commission is such, MarginaliaA strayt Commission from the Queene to bring the Lady Elizabeth either quicke, or dead. and so straineth vs, that we must needes bring you with vs, eyther quicke or dead. Wherat she being amased, sorowfully said, that their Commission was very sore: but yet notwithstanding she hoped it to be otherwise, and not so strait. Yes verely, said they. Whereupon they called for two Phisitions, Doctor Owen and Doctor Wendy, demaunded of them, whether she might be remoued from thence with lyfe, or no. Whose aunswere and iudgement was, that there was no impediment to theyr iudgement, to the contrary, but that shee might trauayle without daunger of lyfe.

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MarginaliaThe gentlenes of Q. Mary to send her horselitter to bring her sister to trouble.In conclusion, they willed her to prepare agaynst the morning at nine of the clocke to goe with them, declaring that they had brought with them the Queenes Lytter for her. After much talk, the messengers declaring how there was no prolonging of times & daies, so departed to theyr chamber, being entertained and cheared as appertained to their worships.

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MarginaliaLady Elizabeth taketh her iourney toward the Queene.On the next morow at the time prescribed, they hadde her forth as shee was, very faynt and feeble, and in suche case, that shee was ready to swound three or foure tymes betweene them. What shoulde I speake here that cannot well be expressed, what an heauy house there was to behold the vnreuerend and doulefull dealyng of these men, but especially the carefull feare  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 607, line 10

D. Cox, in a metrical paraphrase of the Lord's Prayer in Farr's "Select Poetry," p. 504, has-
"Forgive us our offences all
Relieve our careful conscience."

and captiuitie of their innocent Lady and Mistresse.

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Now to proceed in her iourney from Ashrydge, al sick in the Litter, she came to Redborne, where she was garded all night: From thence to S. Albones, to Syr Rafe Rowlets house, where she taryed that night, both feble in body, and comfortles in minde. From that place they passed to Maister Doddes house at Mymmes, where also they remayned that night: and so from thence she came to Highgate: where she being very sicke, taryed that night and the next day. During whiche time of her abode there, came many Purseuantes and messengers from the court: but for what purpose I cannot tell.

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MarginaliaLady Elizabeth brought vp to London.From þt place she was conueied to the Court: whereby the way came to meete her, many Gentlemen, to accōpany her highnesse, which were very sory to see her in that case. But especially a great multitude of people ther were standing by the way, who then flocking about her Litter, lamēted and bewailed greatly her estate. Now, when she came to the Court, her grace was there straight wais shut vp, and kept as close prisonner a fortnight, which was till Palme sonday,  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 607, line 26

{Cattley/Pratt omits 'which was till Palme sonday' from the text.} All the Editions after that of 1563 add, "which was till Palm-Sunday," which clause is here omitted; for though it may have been literally true that Elizabeth was only a fortnight without seeing "lord nor friend," yet it appears to have been three weeks before Gardiner visited her on Friday before Palm-Sunday.

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seeing neither King nor Queene, nor lord, nor frend, all that time, but only then the Lord Chamberlaine, Syr Iohn Gage, and the Vicechamberlaine, which were attendant vnto the dores. MarginaliaSyr William Sentlow committed to the Tower.About whiche time Syr William Sentlowe  
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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 607, fn 1

St. Lo, or St. Leo, the captain of the guard. - ED. Appendix: The imprisonment of Sir W. Sentlow on Saturday, February 24th, is mentioned supra ... It corroborates the opinion that Elizabeth arrived in town on Thursday, February 22d.

was called before the Counsaile. To whose charge was laid, that he knew of Wyats rebellion. Which he stoutly denied, protesting þt hee was a true man, both to God & his Prince, defying al traytors and rebels: but being straitly examined, he was in cōclusion committed to the Tower.

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