Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesLatin/Greek TranslationsCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Williams of Thame

(1500? - 1559)

1st Baron Williams of Thame (1554 - 1559) (DNB)

Sir John Williams was ordered by the privy council to convey Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer from the Tower of London to Oxford, 10 March 1555 (1583, p. 1428).

[NB: APC IV (1552 - 1554), p. 406, has an order to the lieutenant of the Tower to deliver Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer to him (dated 8 March 1553 [1554]), but it has no order to Williams dated 10 March. Foxe's source for this, however, must have been privy council records; this particular entry must have been lost].

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Williams conveyed Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer to Oxford in his capacity as sheriff of Oxfordshire.Elizabeth was released from the Tower into his custody; he treated her gently and courteously (1563, p. 1004; 1570, p. 1642; 1576, p. 1401; 1583, p. 1471).

Williams greeted Philip, the son of Charles V, on his arrival at Southampton on 20 July 1554 (1570, p. 1642; 1576, p. 1401; 1583, p. 1471).

Ridley spoke with Lord Williams before his martyrdom. 1563, p. 1379, 1570, p. 1937, 1576, p. 1662, 1583, p. 1769.

Lord Williams, Lord Chandos, Sir Thomas Bridges and Sir John Browne arrived in Oxford, prior to Cranmer's martyrdom. 1563, p. 1498, 1570, p. 2063, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1885.

After Wyatt's rebellion, Lord Williams of Thame went to see Elizabeth at Ashridge and found her to be unwell. 1563, p. 1711, 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

Benifield was not happy at the treatment Elizabeth received when she was at the house of Lord Williams of Thame. 1563, p. 1713, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2090.

Foxe recounts Benifield's behaviour towards Elizabeth when she stayed at the house of Lord Williams of Thame. 1563, p. 1713, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2090.

[The fact that Williams summoned John Jewel to his deathbed in 1569 may indicate that Williams had protestant sympathies (DNB)].

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Lady Jane Grey

(1537 - 1554) (DNB)

Eldest surviving daughter of Henry Grey, marquis of Dorset and later duke of Suffolk. [DNB]

Foxe states that at his death, Edward VI bequeathed the throne to Lady Jane. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1870.

Jane Grey was named by Edward VI as his heir and proclaimed queen (1563, p. 901; 1570, p. 1567; 1576, p. 1336; 1583, p. 1406).

She was compared favorably to Edward VI in learning; she was also compared to Aspasia, Sempronia and the mother of the Gracchi (1563, p. 901; 1570, p. 1576; 1576, p. 1336; and 1583, p. 1406).

Cranmer refused to swear allegience to Lady Jane. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, pp. 2045-46, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1870.

The dukes of Northumberland and Suffolk were executed for their support of Lady Jane. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

She was imprisoned in the Tower for nearly five months after Mary became queen (1563, p. 902; 1570, p. 1569; 1576, p. 1338; 1583, p. 1407).

Jane Grey's writings and letters (1563, pp. 917-22; 1570, pp. 1580-84; 1576, pp. 1348-52; 1583, pp. 1420-22).

Jane was executed 12 February 1554 (1563, p 823; 1570, p. 1584; 1576, p. 1352; 1583, p. 1422).

Lady Jane and her husband were beheaded. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

Jane Grey's words at her execution and a description of her execution are in 1563, p. 919; 1570, p. 1584; 1576, p. 1352; and 1583, p. 1422.

Latin verses written by Jane Grey are in 1563, p. 922; 1570, p. 1584; 1576, p. 1352; and 1583, pp. 1422-23).

Latin verses commemorating Jane Grey (by John Parkhust, John Foxe and Laurence Humphrey) are in 1563, pp. 923; 1570, pp. 1584-85; 1576, p. 1352; and 1583, p. 1423.

Foxe refers to Lady Jane Grey's marriage to Sir Guildford Dudley. 1583, p. 2128.

Lady Anne Wharton curtsied to a statue of the Virgin Mary and Jane Grey rebuked her for it. 1563, p. 1730, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2128.

[Also referred to as 'Jane Dudley']

 
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Owen Oglethorpe

(d. 1559)

President of Magdalen College, Oxford (1535 - 1552 and 1553 - 1559); dean of Windsor (1554 - 1556); bishop of Carlisle (1557 - 1559). Performed the coronation ceremony for Elizabeth. [see DNB ].

Owen Oglethorpe was one of the participants in the Oxford disputations of 1554 (1563, pp. 936-38, 943-44, 969 and 971; 1570, pp. 1591-93, 1596-981[recte 1597], 1616 and 1618; 1576, pp. 1358-59, 1362 and 1379-80 and 1583, pp. 1428-30, 1432-33, 1449 and 1451).

[NB: A brief account of the Oxford disputations, only in 1563, mentions Oglethorpe debating with Cranmer (1563, p. 933). He is listed as debating with Ridley (1563, p. 934; 1570, p. 1606; 1576, p. 1371; 1583, p. 1441).]

According to Foxe, Oglethorpe was present when William Glynn asked Ridley's forgiveness for insulting him during Ridley's disputation on 17 April (1563, p. 971; 1570, p. 1618; 1576, p. 1380; 1583, p. 1451).

Elizabeth spent the night at the house of the dean of Windsor on her way to Woodstock. 1570, p. 2292, 1576, p. 1985, 1583, p. 2094.

Oglethorpe was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

Owen Oglethorpe died after Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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Sir Henry Bedingfield [or Benifield]

(1511 - 1583)

Of Oxborough, Norfolk. JP Norfolk (1538 - 1554). Lieutenant of the Tower (October 1555 - c. September 1556). Vice-chamberlain of Household and Captain of the Guard (Dec 1557- November 1558). Privy councillor. (DNB; Bindoff)

When the constable of the Tower was dismissed, he was replaced by Bedingfield in order to watch over Elizabeth who was then prisoner in the Tower. 1563, p. 1713, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2090.

Bedingfield was involved in Elizabeth's removal from the Tower to Richmond. 1563, p. 1713, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2090.

Bedingfield was not happy at the treatment Elizabeth received when she was at the house of Lord Williams of Thame. 1563, p. 1713, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2090.

Foxe recounts Bedingfield's behaviour towards Elizabeth when she stayed at the house of Lord Williams of Thame. 1563, p. 1713, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2090.

When he had to leave the Tower, Bedingfield left instructions that no one should have access to Elizabeth until his return. 1563, p. 1712v [no page number; following recto is 1713], 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2090.

He was one of Elizabeth's guards during her removal from Woodstock. 1563, p. 1712v [no page number; following recto is 1713], 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2090.

James Basset wanted to meet with Sir Henry Bedingfield. 1563, p. 1712v [no page number; following recto is 1713], 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2090.

Bedingfield guarded Elizabeth on her removal to Rycote, Oxfordshire. 1563, p. 1712v [no page number; following recto is 1713], 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2090.

He brought Elizabeth to see Mary in her bedchamber. 1570, p. 2295, 1576, p. 1987.

Elizabeth was sent to Woodstock and placed in Sir Henry Bedingfield's custody. Foxe criticizes him for his strict and severe custody of her (1563, p. 1004; 1570, p. 1642; 1576, p 1401; 1583, p. 1611). In the 1563 edition, this was followed by passages praising Elizabeth for her mercy in not seeking revenge on Bedingfield (1563, p. 1004); these passages were never reprinted.

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Bedingfield reported to the privy council that Stephen Appes was mad (1583, p. 1577).

Elizabeth was set free by Bedingfield and she forgave him his actions. 1570, p. 2295, 1576, p. 1987.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir William Dormer

(1514 - 1575)

Of West Wycombe, Buckinghamshire. Father of Jane Dormer, duchess of Feria. (Bindoff)

Sir William Dormer entertained Elizabeth at his house. 1563, p. 1715, 1570, p. 2294, 1576, p. 1986, 1583, p. 2292.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richmond, Surrey
Richmond
NGR: TQ 175 750

A parish in the first division of the hundred of Kingston, county of Surrey. 8 miles west-south-west from London. The living is a vicarage, consolidated with that of Kingston by Act of Parliament, in the Archdeaconry of Surrey and Diocese of Winchester.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Windsor
NGR: SU 967 768

A borough, market town and parish having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Ripplesmere, county of Berkshire. 20 mile east by north from Reading, 22.5 miles west by south from London. The castle, built by Henry I, occupies more than 12 acres of ground, comprising upper, lower and middle wards. A principal royal residence in Tudor times. The living [of the town] is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Berkshire, Diocese of Salisbury.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Woodstock
NGR: SP 444 163

A borough and parish, having separate jurisdiction, locally within the Liberty of the City of Oxford, county of Oxford. 8 miles north-north-west from Oxford. A civil parish, but ecclesiastically a chapelry of the rectory of Bladon, Archdeaconry and Diocese of Oxford.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2118 [2094]

Q. Mary. Gods prouidence in preseruing Lady Elizabeth in Queene Maries tyme.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.they had done. Wherefore afterwards the Chamberlaine rebuked highly his father, commaunding him to put him out of the house. Alasse poore infant, quoth the father. It is a craftie knaue, quoth the Lorde Chamberlaine: let me see him heere no more.

MarginaliaThe Constable of the Tower discharged of his office.The 5. day of May, the Constable was discharged of hys office of the Tower, and one MarginaliaSyr Henry Benifield with his company, placed about the Lady Elizabeth.Syr Henrye Benifielde  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 613, fn 2

Rather "Bedlingfield;" see Nichols, in his "Progresses of Queen Elizabeth." - ED.

placed in his rowme, a man vnknowen to her grace, and therefore the more feared: which so sodaine mutation was vnto her no little amaze. He brought with him an 100. souldiers in blew coates, MarginaliaLady Elizabeth in great feare and doubt of lyfe.wherwith she was marueilously discomforted, & demaunded of such as were about her, whether the Lady Ianes scaffold were taken away or no, fearing by reason of their comming, least she should haue played her part. To whom aunswere was made, that the scaffolde was taken awaye, and that her grace needed not to doubt of any suche tyrannie: for God woulde not suffer any such treason against her Person. MarginaliaLady Elizabeth in doubt of Syr Henry Benifield.Wherewith beyng contented, but not altogether satisfied, shee asked what syr Henry Benefield was, and whether hee was of that conscience or no, that if her murdering were secretly committed to his charge, he would see the execution thereof.

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She was answeared, that they were ignoraunt what maner of man he was. Howbeit they perswaded her that God would not suffer such wickednesse to proceede. Wel, quoth shee: God graunt it be so. For thou, O God, canste mollifie  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 613, fn 3

"Art the withdrawer and mollifier." Edit. 1563, p. 1713.

all suche tyrannous heartes, and disappoynte all such cruell purposes: and I beseeche thee to heare me thy creature, which am thy seruaunt and at thy commaundement, trusting by thy grace euer so to remaine.

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About which time it was spred abroad, that her grace should be caried from thence by this newe iolly Captaine and his souldiours: but whether, it coulde not be learned. Which was vnto her a great grief, especially for that such a company  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 614, line 1

"Such a kind of company." Ed. 1563.

was appoynted to her gard, requesting rather to continue there still, then to be ledde thence with suche a sort of rascals. At last, plaine answer was made by the L. Shandoyes, that there was no remedye, but from thence she must needes depart to the Manour of Woodstocke, as he thought. Being demaunded of her, for what cause: for that (quoth he) the Tower is like further to be furnished. Shee being desirous to knowe what hee meant  
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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 614, line 7

This {'She being desirous to know what he meant'} is thus expressed in Ed. 1563: "Whereat she being more greedy, as farre as she durste."

thereby, demaunded, wherewith. He answeared, with such matter as the Queene and Counsail were determined in that behalfe, whereof he had no knowledge: and so departed.

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In conclusion, on Trinitie Sonday being the 19. day of Maye,  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 614, fn 1

Trinity Sunday, in 1554, fell on May 20th. Appendix:The Edition of 1563, p. 1713, says, "In conclusion, the xvi day of May she was removed from the Tower," &c.

shee was remooued from the Tower, the Lorde Treasurer being then there for the lading of her Cartes, and discharging the place of the same. Where Syr Henry Benifielde (being appoynted her Gailer) did receiue her wyth a companie of rakehelles to Garde her, besides the Lord of Darbies bande, wayting  
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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 614, line 16

{Cattley/Pratt has 'wafting' instead of 'wayting'. Earlier editions have 'wafting'.} To "waft" is to float (Todd's Johnson) or hover. Hollingshed here uses the term "waiting." May that be a misprint for "waithing," explained in Jamieson's Scottish Dictionary by "wandering, roaming"? Or may "wafting" be a misprint for "waffing," of which the same work gives the meaning "to wave;" and of "waffie" "a vagabond"? "Waffing" is said in the Glossary to Allan Ramsay's Poems, 1721, to mean "wandering." See Brand's Pop. Antiq. III. 122, Edit. 1841.
The reading, however, of "wafting" in this place seems to be supported by the following passage in Cavendish's Life of Wolsey, vol. i. p. 185; "boats full of men and women of the City of London, waffeting up and down in Thames;" which in Dr. Wordsworth's copy (in Eccles. Biogr. i. 565) is "walking up and doune."

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in the Countrey about for the mooneshine in the water. Vnto whome at lengthe came my Lorde of Tame,  
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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 614, fn 2

Hollinshead says that, at this time, he was sir John Williams. - ED.

ioyned in Commission with the sayd Syr Henry, for the safe guiding of her to prisone: and they together conueied her grace to Woodstocke, as hereafter followeth.

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MarginaliaLady Elizabeth remoued from the Tower to Woodstocke.The first day they conducted her to Richmond, where she continued al night, MarginaliaLady Elizabeth secluded frō her seruauntes.being restrained of her owne men, whych were lodged  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 614, line 22

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'lodged' to 'laid' in the text.} All the Editions but the first read "lodged" for "laid."

in oute Chambers, and Syr Henrye Benifields souldiours appointed in their roumes to geue attendance on her person. Wherat she being maruelously dismaid, thinking verely some secret mischief to be a working towards her, called her Gentleman Vsher, and desired him, with the rest of his company, to pray for her. MarginaliaLady Elizabeth in dispayre of her selfe.For this night (quoth she) I thinke to die. Wherwith he being stricken to the heart, sayde: God forbid that any such wickednes should be pretended against your grace. So comforting her as well as he coulde, at last hee brust oute into teares, and went from her downe into the Courte, where were walking the Lorde of Tame and Syr Henrye Benifielde.

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Then he comming to the Lorde of Tame 

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 614, line 19 from the bottom

The first Edition says, "he staieing asyde."

(who hadde profered to him muche friendship) desired to speake wyth him a woord or two. Vnto whome he familiarly sayde, he should with all his heart. Which when Syr Henry, standing by, heard, he asked what the matter was. To whom the Gentleman Vsher answeared: no great matter Syr (sayd he) but to speake with my Lord a woord or two.

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MarginaliaLady Elizabethes Vsher talketh with the Lord of Tame.Then, when the Lorde of Tame came to him, he spake on this wise: My lord (quoth he) you haue ben alwayes my good Lord, and so I beseech you to remain. The cause why I come to you at this time, is to desire your honor, vnfainedly to declare vnto mee whether any daunger is meant towardes my Mistresse this nighte, or no, that I and my poore fellowes may take suche part as shall please God to appoynt: for certainely we wil rather die, then she should secretely and innocently miscarie. Mary (sayde the

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Lord of Tame) MarginaliaThe gentle hart of the Lord of Tame to Lady Elizabeth.God forbid that any such wicked purpose should be wrought: and rather then it shuld be so, I with my men are ready to die at her foote also: and (so praised be God) they passed that dolefull  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 614, line 3 from the bottom

The first Edition reads "doubtful."

nighte, wyth no little heauinesse of heart.

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Afterwards passing ouer the water at Richmond, going towards Wyndsore, her grace espied certaine of her poore seruauntes standing on the other side, whiche were very desirous to see her. Whom when she beheld, turning to one of her men standing by, she sayde: yonder I see certaine of my men: goe to them and say these woordes from me: Tanquam ouis. 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
The Lady Elisabeth, quoting
Foxe text Latin

Tanquam ouis

Foxe text translation

Like a sheepe [to the slaughter]

 
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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 615, line 5

The Queen had these words requoted before her with additional illustration in after-life: see Walton's Life of Hooker, with Keble's note, Edit. Oxf. 1841, p. 35.

MarginaliaTanquam ouis. i. Like a sheepe to the slaughter. 
Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
The Lady Elisabeth, quoting
Foxe text Latin

Tanquam ouis

Foxe text translation

Like a sheepe [to the slaughter]

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So she passing forward to Windsore, was lodged there that night in the Deane of Windsores house, a place more meete in deede for a Priest then a Princesse.

MarginaliaLady Elizabeth honourably receaued and beloued of the people.And from thence her Grace was garded and brought the next night to M. Dormers house,  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 615, fn 1

Namely, at Winge, in Buckinghamshire. - ED.

where much people standing by the waye, some presented to her one gifte, and some an other, so that sir Henry was greatly moued therwith, and troubled the poore people very sore, for shewing their louing hearts in suche a maner, calling them rebels and traitors, with such like vile woordes.

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Besides, as she passed through þe villages, the townes men rang the bels, as being ioyful of her comming, thinking verely it had bene other wise then it was in deede, as the sequele prooued after to the sayde poore men. For immediately the saide syr Henry hearing the same, sent his souldiours thether, who apprehēded some of the ringers, setting them in the stockes, & otherwise vncourteously misusing other some for their good willes.

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On the morrow her grace passing from maister Dormers (where was for þe time of her abode there, a straight watch kept) came to the Lord of Tames house, 

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 615, fn 2

At Ricot, in Oxfordshire. - ED.

MarginaliaThe gentle entertaynement of Lady Elizabeth at the Lord of Tames house.where she lay all the night, being very princely entertained, bothe of Knightes and Ladies, Gentlemen and Gentlewomen. Whereat MarginaliaM. Benefield grudging at the gentle entertaynement of Lady Elizabeth. MarginaliaThe rude and vngentle manly behauiour of Syr Henry Benefield.Syr Henry Benifield grunted, and was highly offended, saying vnto them, that they coulde not tell what they did, and were not able to answere to their doings in that behalfe, letting them to vnderstand that shee was the Queenes Maiesties prisoner, and no otherwise: aduising them therefore to take heede and beware of after clappes. Wherunto the Lord of Tame answered in this wise: that he was wel aduised of his doings, being ioyned in Commission as well as he, adding with warrāt, that her grace might and should in his house be merry.

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MarginaliaLady Elizabeth commeth to Woodstocke.The next day, 

Commentary  *  Close

This anecedote appears as a note in Foxe's handwriting in Foxe's papers: BL, Harley MS 419, fo. 137r.

as she should take her iourney frō Richmond toward Woodstocke, the Lord of Tame, with an other Gentleman being at Tables, playing, and droppyng vie crownes,  
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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 615, lines 16 and 13 from the bottom

A term in gambling, the same as the revy. Florio, p. 442. Halliwell's Dict. of Archaic Words, p. 320. To revie is to bet again.

the Ladie Elizabeth passing by, stayed and sayde, she would see the game plaied out, which sir Henry Benifield would scarse permit. The game running longe about, and they playing drop vie crownes, come on, sayth he, I will tarie, sayth she, and will see this game out.

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After this, sir Henry went vp into a chamber, where was appointed for her grace a chaire, two cushions, and a foote carpet very faire & princelike, wherein presumptuously he sate, and called one Barwike his mā to pul of his bootes. Which as soone as it was known among þe ladies and Gentles, euery one mused therat, and laughed him to scorne, obseruing his vndiscrete maners in that behalfe, as they might very well.

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When supper was done, he called my L. and willed him that all the Gentlemen and Ladies should withdraw themselues euery one to his lodging, meruailing much þt he would permit there such a cōpany, considering so great a charge committed to him.

Sir Henry (quoth my Lord) content your self, all shal be voyded, your men and all. MarginaliaThe strayte watch kept at woodstocke.Nay my souldiours (quoth sir Henry) shall watch all night. The Lord of Tame aunswered, it shall not need. Well sayd he, neede or neede not, they shall so do, mistrusting belike the company, whiche God knoweth was without cause.

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The next day her grace tooke her iourney from thence to Woodstocke, where she was inclosed, as before in the Tower of London, the souldiors garding and wardyng both within and without the walles, euery day to þe number of three score, and in the night without the wals xl. during the tyme of her imprisonment there.

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At length shee had gardens appointed for her walke, which was very comfortable to her grace. But alwayes when she did recreate her selfe therein, the dores were fast locked vp, in as straite maner as they were in the Tower, beyng at the least v. or vj. lockes betwene her lodging and her walkes: Sir Henry himselfe keping the keyes, and trusting no man therewith. Wherupon she called him her Gaoler: and he kneling downe, desired her grace not to cal him so, for he was appointed there to be one of her officers. From such officers (quoth she) good Lord deliuer me.

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And
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