Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt References
Names and Places on this Page
James BassetPaul PenyBladonHampton Court
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
James Basset

(1526? - 1558)

James Basset is described by Foxe as a darling of Stephen Gardiner. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2094.

Basset wanted to meet with Sir Henry Bedingfield. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2094.

Basset was a conspirator in plots to murder Elizabeth. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2094.

[Son of Honor, Lady Lisle. Married Mary, daughter of William Roper (c. June 1556). Member of Gardiner's household and King Philip's privy chamber (Bindoff).]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Paul Peny

Paul Peny was Elizabeth's jailor at Woodstock. 1563, p. 1715, 1570, p. 2294, 1576, p. 1986, 1583, p. 2291.

 
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Bladon
Bladenbridge
NGR: SP 449 148

A parish in the hundred of Wootton, county of Oxford. 2 miles south from Woodstock. The living is a rectory with the chapelry of New Woodstock annexed, in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Oxford.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Hampton Court
Hampton Court, Hampton Courte
NGR: TQ 166 681

Royal palace and peculiar. 2.5 miles south of Richmond

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2119 [2095]

Queene Mary. Gods prouidence in preseruing Lady Elizabeth in Queene Maries tyme.

MarginaliaAnno 1558. MarginaliaA mery story concerning the strayte keeping of the Lady Elizabeth.And nowe by the way as disgressing, or rather refreshing the reader, if it be lawfull in so serious a story to recite a matter incident, & yet not imperinent to the same: occasion here moueth, or rather inforceth me to touch briefelye what hapned in the same place and time by a certayne mery conceited man, being then about her grace: who noting the strayte and straunge keeping of his Lady and Mistres by the sayd Syr Henry Benifield, with so many lockes & dores, with such watch & ward about her, as was straūge & wonderful, spyed a Goate in the ward where her grace was: and whether to refresh her oppressed mind, or to notify her strayt handling by Syr Henry, either els both, he tooke it vpon his necke, and folowed her grace therewyth as she was going into her lodging.

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Which when she saw, she asked him what he would do with it, willing to let it alone. Vnto whom the sayd party aunswered: no by Saynt Mary (if it like your grace) will I not: for I cannot tell whether he be one of the Queenes frendes or no. I will cary him to Syr Henry Benifielde (God willing) to know what he is. So leauing her grace, he went with the Goate on his necke, and caryed it to syr Henry Benifield. Who when he saw him comming wyth it, asked him halfe angerly what he had there.

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Vnto whom the party aunswered, saying: Syr (quoth he) I can not tell what he is. I pray you examine him, for I founde him in the place where my Ladyes Grace was walking, and what talke they haue had I can not tell. For I vnderstād him not, but he should seme to me to be some straunger, and I thinke verely a Welchman, for he hath a white friese coate on his back. And forsomuch as I being the Queenes Subiect, MarginaliaThe straytenes of Syr Henry Benifield merely noted.and perceiuing the strayte charge committed to you of her keeping, that no straunger should haue accesse to her without sufficient licence, I haue here foūd a straunger (what he is I cannot tell) in place where her Grace was walking: & therefore for the necessary discharge of my duety, I thought it good to bring the sayde straunger to you, to examine, as you see cause: and so he set him down. At which his words Syr Henry semed much displeased, and sayd: Well, well, you will neuer leaue this geare I see: and so they departed.

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MarginaliaLady Elizabeth with much ado, suffered to write to the Queene.Now, to returne to the matter from whence we haue digressed, after her Grace had bene there a time, she made suite to the Counsell that she might be suffered to write to the Queene. Which at last was permitted: So that Syr Henry Benifield brought her penne, inke, and paper: and standing by her while she wrote (which he straitly obserued) always she being wery, he would cary away her letters, and bring them agayne when she called for them. In the finishing thereof, he would haue bene messenger to the Queene of the same. Whose request her grace denied, saying: one of her owne men should cary them, and that she would neither trust him, nor none of his therein.

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Then he answering agayne, said: none of them durst be so bold (he trowed) to cary her letters, beyng in that case. Yes (quoth she) I am assured I haue none so dishonest that would deny my request in that behalfe, but wil be as willyng to serue me now as before. Well (sayd he) my commission is to the contrary, and I may not so suffer it. Her grace replying againe, said: you charge me very oftē with your commission. MarginaliaThe cruell dealing of Syr Henry Benifield to the Lady Elizabeth reprooued.I pray God you may iustly aunswer the cruel dealing you vse towards me.

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Then he kneeling downe, desired her grace to thinke and consider how he was a seruant, & put in trust there by the Queene to serue her Maiestie, protesting that if þe case were hers, he would as willingly serue her grace, as now he did the Queenes highnesse. For the which his aunswer her grace thanked hym, desiring God that she might neuer haue neede of such seruauntes as he was: declaryng further to hym, that hys doynges towardes her were not good nor answerable, but more then all the friends he had would stand by. 

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 617, fn 1

"For in the ende she told him plainly they would forsake him." Ed. 1563, p. 1714.

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To whome Sir Henry replied and sayde, that there was no remedy but his doyngs must be aunswered, and so they should, trusting to make good accompt therof. The cause which mooued her grace to say, was for that hee would not permit her letters to be caried iiij. or v. dayes after the writyng thereof. MarginaliaThe letters of the Lady Elizabeth sent to the Queene.But in fine hee was content to send for her Gentleman from the Towne of Woodstocke, demaunding of him whether he durst enterprise the cariage of her Graces letters to the Queene, or no: & he aunswered, yea Sir, that I dare, and will withall my heart. Whereupon sir Henry halfe, agaynst his stomacke, tooke them vnto hym.

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MarginaliaD. Owen and D. Wendye, Q. Maryes Phisitions, sent to the Lady Elizabeth.Then about the viij. of Iune came downe Doctour Owen and Doctour Wendye, sent by the Queene to her grace, for that she was sickly: who ministring to her, and lettyng her bloud, taried there and attended on her grace v. or vj. dayes. Then she being wel amēded, they returned

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againe to the Courte, making theyr good reporte to the Queene and the Counsaile of her graces behauioure and humblenesse towards the Queenes highnesse. Which her Maiestie hearing, tooke very thankefully: MarginaliaThe Popish Prelates repined against the Lady Elizabeth.but the bishops thereat repined, looked blacke in the mouth, and tolde the Queene, they marueiled that she submitted not her selfe to her maiesties mercye, considering that shee had offended her highnesse.

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MarginaliaLady Elizabeth requested to submit her selfe to the Queene.About this time, her Grace was requested by a secrete frende, to submit her selfe to the Queenes maiestie, whych woulde be very well taken, and to her great quiet & commoditie. Vnto whom she answered, that she would neuer submitte her selfe to them whome she neuer offended. For (quoth she) if I haue offended and am giltie, I then craue no mercy, but the law, which I am certaine (quoth she) I should haue had ere this, if it coulde be prooued by me. For I know my selfe (I thanke God) to be out of the daunger thereof, wishing that I were as cleare out of the pearil of my ennemies, and then I am assured I shoulde not so be locked and bolted vp within walles and doores as I am. God geue them a better minde when it pleaseth him.

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MarginaliaCounsell of the Papistes to mary the Lady Elizabeth to a Spanyard.About this time was there a great consulting among the Bishops and Gentlemen touching a Mariage for her grace, which some of the Spanyardes wished to be wyth some straunger, that she might go out of the Realme with her portion: some saying one thing, and some an other.

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MarginaliaWicked counsell geuen of the Lord Paget agaynst the Lady Elizabeth.A Lorde (who shalbe heere namelesse) being there, at last sayd, that the King should neuer haue any quiet common wealth in Englande, vnlesse her head were stricken from the shoulders. MarginaliaSpanyardes more fauorable to Lady Elizabeth then some English men.Whereunto the Spanyards answeared, saying: God forbid that their king and master should haue that minde to consent to such a mischiefe.

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This was the curteous aunswer of the Spanyardes to the Englishmen, speaking after that sorte against theyr owne country. From that day the Spaniardes neuer left of their good perswasions to the king, that the like honour he shoulde neuer obtaine, as he shoulde in deliueryng the Lady Elizabeths grace out of prison: wherby at lēgth she was happely released from the same. Here is a plaine and euident example of the good clemencie and nature of the King and his Counsellers towards her grace (praised be God therefore) who mooued their heartes therein. Then heereuppon shee was sente for shortlye after to come to Hampton Court.

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MarginaliaLady Elizabeth in daunger of fire.But before her remoouing away from Woodstocke, we will a litle stay to declare in what dangers her life was in during this time shee there remained: first thorough fire, which began to kindle betweene the boardes and seeling vnder the chamber where shee lay, whether by a sparke of fire, gotten into a cranye, or whether of purpose by some that meant her no good, the Lord doth knowe. Neuerthelesse a woorshipfull Knight of Oxfordshire, whyche was there ioyned the same time with Syr Henry Benifield in keeping that Ladye (who then tooke vp the boardes and quēched the fire) verely supposed it to be done of purpose.

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MarginaliaLady Elizabeth in daunger of killing.Furthermore it is thought, and also affirmed (if it be true) of one Paule Peny a Keeper of Woodstocke, a notorious ruffin and a butcherly wretch, that he was appoynted to kill þe sayd Lady Elizabeth: who both sawe the man being often in her sight, and also knewe thereof.

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MarginaliaAn other conspiracye of murder agaynst Lady Elizabeth.An other time, one of the priuie chamber, a great man about the Queene, and chiefe darling of Steuen Gardiner, named master Iames Basset, came to Blandenbridge a mile from Woodstocke, with 20. or 30. priuie coates, and sent for Syr Henrye Benifielde to come and speake with him. But, as God would, which disposed all things after the purpose of his owne will, so it happened, that a lyttle before the sayd Syr Henry Benifield was sent for by post to the Counsell, leauing straight woord behinde him with his brother, that no man, what so euer hee were, thoughe comming with a Bill of the Queenes hand, or any other warrant, should haue accesse to her before his retourne againe. By reason wherof it so fell out, that M. Benifields brother comming to him at the Bridge, would suffer hym in no case to approche in, who otherwise (as is supposed) was appoynted violently to murther the innocent Lady.

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MarginaliaLady Elizabeth preserued by the Lordes prouidence from execution in the Tower.
Winchesters platforme ouerthrowen.
MarginaliaWhereof read before pag. 1787. In the life of Steuen Gardiner wee declared before, page 1787. howe that the Ladie Elizabeth beynge in the Tower, a Wrytte came downe, subscribed wyth certaine handes of the Counsell for her execution. Which if it were certaine, as it is reported, Winchester (no doubt) was deuiser of that mischieuous drift: and doubtlesse the same Achitophel had brought hys impious purpose that daye to passe, had not the fatherly prouidence of almightye God, (who is always stronger then the deuill) stirred vp M. Bridges, Lieutenaunte the same time of the Tower, to come in hast to the Queene, to geue certificate therof, and to knowe further her consent touching her sisters deathe.

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