Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
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Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Harpsfield

(1516 - 1578)

Chaplain to Bishop Bonner. Archdeacon of London (1554 - 1559); dean of Norwich (1558 - 1559). Brother of Nicholas Harpsfield. [DNB; Fasti]

Harpsfield preached a sermon at the commencement of the 1553 convocation (1570, p. 1571; 1576, p. 1340; and 1583, p. 1410).

He sparred with Philpot in the debates at the 1553 convocation. (See 1563, pp. 909, 912 and 914-15; 1570, pp. 1573-74 and 1576-78; 1576, pp. 1342 and 1345-46 and 1583, pp. 1412 and 1416-17).

He was one of the catholic disputants at the Oxford disputations of 1554; he debated with Cranmer and Ridley (1563, pp. 932-34, 938, 955, 967-69 and 978; 1570, pp. 1591-93 and 1605-6; 1576, pp. 1358-59 and 1370-71; 1583, pp. 1428, 1430 and 1440-41).

Harpsfield disputed on the eucharist for his D.D. on 19 April 1554; Cranmer disputed with him (1563, pp. 986-91; 1570, pp. 1627-32; 1576, pp. 1389-92; 1583, pp. 1459-63).

He gave a Latin oration in St Paul's before King Philip (1570, p. 1643; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

He witnessed Bonner's burning Tomkins' hand with a candle, and he urged Bonner to cease the torture (1570, pp. 1710-11; 1576, p. 1460; 1583, p.1534).

Together with William Chedsey and John Feckenham, Harpsfield attempted to persuade John Hooper to recant after his condemnation on 29 January 1555. The attempt was unsuccessful but it caused false rumors of Hooper's recantation to spread (1563, p. 1057; 1570, p. 1680; 1576, p. 1434; 1583, p. 1507).

Harpsfield witnessed the degradation of John Rogers and John Hooper on 4 February 1555 (1563, p. 1058; 1570, p. 1681; 1576, p. 1435; 1583, p. 1508).

He was one of those who presided over the examination of Thomas Tomkins on 9 February 1555 (1570, p. 1712; 1576, p. 1461; 1583, p. 1535).

Harpsfield was one of those who examined Thomas Causton and Thomas Higbed on 18 February 1555 (1563, p. 1104). Bonner ordered him to deliver a rebuttal to the confession of faith of Thomas Causton and Thomas Higbed (1563, p. 1107; 1570, p. 1719; 1576, p. 1468; 1583, p. 1541).

He conversed with Thomas Hawkes in June 1554, arguing the necessity of infant baptism. 1563, pp. 1151-52;1570, pp. 1760-61; 1576, p. 1551 [recte 1503]; 1583, pp. 1587-88

He escorted Thomas Hawkes to the Gatehouse at Westminster on 1 July 1554. 1563, p. 1156; 1570, p. 1765;1576, p. 1765; 1583, p. 1590

John Harpsfield conferred with the bishop of Durham about John Bradford. 1563, p. 1191, 1570, p. 1787, 1576, p. 1526, 1583, p. 1609.

On 16 February 1555 John Harpsfield and two others went to see Bradford in prison, to defend the line of bishops in the catholic church. Bradford refuted the argument. 1563, pp. 1202-03, 1570, pp. 1792-93, 1576, pp. 1530-31, 1583, pp. 1614-15.

Smith was examined by Bonner and Harpsfield, among others, met with Harwood in the garden, and was re-examined. Smith was then left in the garden until Harwood was examined, after which Smith was examined again. 1563, pp. 1252-55, 1570, pp. 1870-72, 1576, pp. 1601-03, 1583, pp. 1691-92.

Robert Smith was examined by John Dee, Harpsfield and Bonner on eucharistic doctrine. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

Philpot's fourth examination was in John Harpsfield's house before Bonner, Bath, Worcester and Gloucester. 1563, pp. 1393-98, 1570, pp. 1965-68, 1576, pp. 1692-95, 1583, pp. 1799-1803.

[In a letter that was never delivered] Green told Philpot of his presentment on 17 November before Bonner and two bishops, Master Dean, Roper, Welch, John Harpsfield, and two or three others. Dr Dale, Master George Mordant and Master Dee were also there. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

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Philpot's eighth examination was before Bonner, John Harpsfield, St David's, Mordant and others. 1563, pp. 1419-20, 1570, pp. 1982-83, 1576, pp. 1705-06, 1583, p. 1814.

During Philpot's ninth examination, Bonner called for John Harpsfield, who attended the session to examine Philpot, and Chadsey, who had however left for Westminster. 1563, pp. 1420-24, 1570, pp. 1983-85, 1576, pp. 1707-09, 1583, pp. 1815-16.

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

Later on the day of his thirteenth examination, Philpot spoke with John Harpsfield, Bonner and Chadsey. 1570, pp. 1996-97, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, pp. 1823-24.

John Harpsfield urged Thomas Whittle to recant and composed a bill of submission for Whittle to sign. 1563, pp. 1454-55, 1570, p. 2017, 1576, p. 1737, 1583, pp. 1845-46.

John Harpsfield wrote a letter to Bonner about Whittle's suscription. It mentioned one of Penbroke's men who wanted license to erect a school. Harpsfield hoped for Penbroke's sake that it be requested, and he and M Johnson (Register) were working to that effect. 1563, pp. 1455-56, 1570, pp. 2017-18, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, pp. 1846-47. [In all editions after 1563, the heading incorrectly gives the author of the letter as Nicholas Harpsfield.]

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Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2097.

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Bonner sent Thomas Hinshaw before John Harpsfield and Henry Cole. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Bonner attended evensong with John Harpsfield prior to causing several boys to be beaten in 1558. 1563, p. 1692, 1570, p. 2264, 1576, p. 1955, 1583, p. 2061.

Bonner and Harpsfield laughed at and mocked Edward Benet for his beliefs. 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Harpsfield was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
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John Mordaunt

(1490? - 1562)

First baron Mordaunt of Turrey. Privy councillor and a member of several county commissions.(DNB)

John Mordaunt was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2097.

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John Fetty was taken by Richard Tanner and his fellow constables to Sir John Mordaunt who then sent him to Cluney, Bonner's summoner. 1563, p. 1693, 1570, p. 2257, 1576, p. 1949, 1583, p. 2056.

 
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John Norris

(by 1502 - 1577)

Of Fifield, Berkshire. MP for Dowton (1553, 1554), Taunton (1554), Bodmin (1555), Gentleman Usher of the Privy Chamber by 1536 and 1553 - 1558. Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod and Order of the Garter (1554 - 1577). [Bindoff]

John Norris arrested Elizabeth's lady-in-waiting, Mistress Ashley, and imprisoned her in the Fleet. 1570, p. 2295, 1576, p. 1987, 1583, p. 2294.

 
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John Story

(1510? - 1571)

1st Regius Professor of Civil Law. Roman catholic martyr. (DNB)

John Story was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

In the 1563 edition, Foxe claims that Story urged that Elizabeth be executed, maintaining that it was pointless to cut the branches off a tree and not strike at its roots (1563, p. 1004). These passages were never reprinted.

In a letter to Augustine Bernher, Bradford asked him to discover what Master G. had said to Doctor Story and others. 1570, p. 1837, 1576, p. 1572, 1583, p. 1654.

Dr Story was said by Dr Martin to have been the chief procurer of the deaths of John Warren, his wife and daughter, although he was a relative of theirs. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

When John Denley sang a psalm at his burning, Story rebuked him for it. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1686.

John Story is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

The first examination of John Philpot was by Cholmley, Master Roper and John Story and one of the scribes of the Arches at Newgate Hall on 2 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89 , 1583, pp. 1795-96.

In Philpot's first examination, Story claimed that Philpot was guilty of heresy for speaking against the mass. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

Philpot's second examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story and Cook and the scribe on 24 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

During Philpot's second examination, Story demanded that Philpot be taken to Lollard's Tower, after which he was imprisoned in Bonner's coal house. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

Story was one of the commissioners who sent John Went, John Tudson, Thomas Brown and Joan Warren to be examined and imprisoned. 1563, p. 1453, 1570, p. 2016, 1576, p. 1737, 1583, p. 1845.

A complaint about John Tudson was sent to Story. 1563, p. 1467, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1749, 1583, p. 1857.

Cranmer was examined by Brookes, Martin and Story. 1563, pp. 1479-83, 1570, pp. 2046-47, 1576, pp. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

A new commission was sent to Rome for the restoration of the pope's authority to allow the condemnation of Cranmer. Those sent were: James Brookes, Martyn and Story . 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Story's oration against Cranmer. 1576, pp. 1769-70, 1583, pp. 1875-76.

Story said that they were true witnesses, as they swore allegience to the pope. Cranmer was was sent to Gloucester by Story. 1570, p. 2056, 1576, p. 1773, 1583, p. 1879.

Henry Adlington received a letter from John Careless, which referred to Story. 1570, pp. 2110-12, 1576, pp. 1833-34, 1583, pp. 1928-29.

Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 1980.

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Ralph Allerton was examined on 24 April 1557 before Bonner, Lord North, Dr Story and others. 1563, p. 1621, 1570, p. 2210-11, 1576, p. 1907-08, 1583, p. 2015-16.

A chaplain asked Thomas Green to repeat the articles of his faith before Story. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2061.

Story questioned Green on the mass and the church fathers. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Green appeared again before Story. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Story commanded Green be whipped 100 times, although this was objected to, at which point Story said he would have Green's tongue cut out if he could. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2062.

Elizabeth Young's eighth examination was before Bonner, the dean of St Paul's and Story. 1570, pp. 2273-74, 1576, pp. 1962-63, 1583, pp. 2069-70.

Alexander Wimshurst was carried before Story and Cook who asked him where his whore was. Wimshurst defended his wife's honour and her whereabouts. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Edward Benet asked Story to help him out of prison, which he did, only to deliver him to Cluney who put him in stocks in the coalhouse for a week. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Richard Waterson was examined by Story, when he was told that £40 would release him from punishment. This was reduced to £10 but eventually a warrant was made to Richard Grafton who was forced to watch the beating of Gye upon a cross at Bridewell. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

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John Story had accused Angel's wife of murdering a woman and her child who resided with her in her house. He sent her to Newgate. Sir Roger Cholmley dismissed the charges against her. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2010.

At Elizabeth's accession Story was committed to ward but he managed to escape overseas, where he met with the duke of Alva in Antwerp. 1583, p. 2153.

Parker, a merchant, was sent to apprehend Story and return him to England. 1583, p. 2153.

Parker told Story that a ship had come from England and that he might like to peruse the merchandise on board. Story suspected nothing, was caught and returned to England. 1583, p. 2153.

In prison, Story refused to agree to the act of supremacy and was subsequently hung, drawn and quartered as a traitor. 1583, p. 2153.

Foxe refers to his death. 1563, p. 1706.

 
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Katherine Ashley

(d. 1565) [State Papers Spanish, 1558 - 1567, p. 455.]

Governess to princess Elizabeth. Daughter of Sir Philip Champernon. Elizabeth's chief gentlewoman of the privy chamber (1558 - 1565). Married John Ashley.

Katherine Ashley was arrested by Jerningham and Norris and imprisoned in the Fleet. 1563, p. 1715, 1570, p. 2295, 1576, p. 1987, 1583, p. 2091.

[No relation to James Ashley the martyr or James Ashley of Ipswich.]

[Katherine Ashley was arrested and examined in 1554 and imprisoned in May 1554. (See CSP, 8, nos.80 and 54 and SP Venetian, 6, pp. 474, 475.)]

[Katherine Ashley was arrested for her involvement in the scandal of Elizabeth's courtship with Sir Thomas Seymour. See George Bernard, 'The Downfall of Sir Thomas Seymour' G. W. Bernard (ed.), The Tudor Nobility (Manchester, 1992); David Starkey, Elizabeth (London, 2002), pp. 69, 71-75.]

[Her brother was Sir Arthur Champernon (by 1524 - 1578), sheriff of Devon by 1559 - 1560, MO (1547, 1555, 1559, 1563) of Modbury, Devon. He supported Wyatt's rebellion and opposed Mary's government in parliament. (Bindoff). He helped suppress the 1549 rebellion. (Hasler) He was related by marriage to Sir Maurice Berkley. (Bindoff)].

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Laurence Sheriff

(d. 1567)

Founder of Rugby School. Second warden of Grocers' Company (1566) (DNB).

Laurence Sheriff talked with Robert Farrer in the Rose tavern. Farrer suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 1980.

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Sheriff said that he had seen Pole kneel and kiss the hand of Elizabeth. 1563, p. 1736.

 
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Reginald Pole

(1500 - 1558)

Archbishop of Canterbury (1555 - 1558) and cardinal. [DNB] Papal legate (1554 - 1557) [Hillerbrand, Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation; T. F. Mayer, Reginald Pole, Prince and Prophet (2000)]

On 7 November 1554, two ambassadors were sent abroad. The rumour was that they were sent to escort Pole to England (1570, p. 1645; 1576, p. 1403; 1583, p. 1473).

Pole landed at Dover on 21 November 1554 and on the same day an act was passed in parliament repealing the act of attainder passed against him in Henry VIII's reign (1570, p. 1647; 1576, p. 1405; 1583, p. 1475; cf. the account of this in 1563, p. 1008). Another notice of the act of attainder against Pole being repealed (1570, p. 1654; 1576, p. 1411; 1583, p. 1481).

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Pole arrived at Lambeth on 24 November 1554 (1570, p. 1647; 1576, p. 1405; 1583, p. 1475).

He arrived at parliament on 27 November 1554 and made an oration there, praising England's previous catholic fidelity, deploring the reformation and extolling papal power (1563, pp. 1008-10; 1570, pp. 1647-49; 1576, pp. 1405-7; 1583, pp. 1476-78).

He pronounced a papal absolution in parliament on 28 November 1554 (1563, pp. 1010-11; 1570, p. 1649; 1576, p. 1407; 1583, pp. 1477-78).

Reginald Pole sent a letter to Pope Julius III on 30 November 1554 announcing the restoration of catholicism in England. 1563, pp. 1013-14 [in Latin, only in this edition, pp. 1012-13] ; 1570, pp. 1650-51; 1576, p. 1408; 1583, pp. 1478-79; also see 1570, p. 1729; 1576, p. 1476; 1583, p. 1559.

He was present at Stephen Gardiner's Paul's Cross sermon of 2 December 1554 (1563, p. 1018; 1570, p. 1651; 1576, p. 1408; 1583, p. 4179 [recte 1479]).

He absolved convocation on 6 December 1554 for their perjuries, heresies and schisms (1570, p. 1652; 1576, p. 1409; 1583, p. 4179 [recte 1479]).

As legate to Julius III, Pole reconciled England to Rome and absolved the English. 1563, pp. 1083-84; 1570, p. 1707; 1576, p. 1457; 1583, p. 1531.

In an attempt to reinstate catholicism at the University of Cambridge, a commission under the direction of Cardinal Pole ordered the condemning and burning of the bones and books of Phagius and Martin Bucer. Members of the commission were Cuthbert Scott, Nicholas Ormanet, Thomas Watson, John Christopherson and Henry Cole. Ormanet was chosen because he had the trust of Pope Julius III. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570]

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Thomas Causton appealed his conviction to Pole. 1563, p. 1107; 1570, p. 1719; 1576, p. 1468; 1583, p. 1541.

Robert Ferrar appealed his conviction to Pole. 1563, p. 1099; 1570, p. 1724; 1576, p. 1472; 1583, p. 1555.

The examination of Ridley and Latimer by White (Lincoln) and Brookes (Gloucester) was held on 30 September 1555. White and Brookes received their commission from 'Cardinall Poole'. 1563, pp. 1297-98, 1570, pp. 1903-09, 1576, pp. 1631-39, 1583, pp. 1757-60.

William Stannard, Thomas Freeman and William Adams were condemned to be burned 13 June 1556 but Cardinal Pole sent dispensation for their lives. 1563, pp. 1525-26, 1570, p. 2097, 1576, p. 1798, 1583, p. 1916.

Pole chose Cuthbert Scot, Nicholas Ormanet, Thomas Watson, John Christopherson and Henry Cole to be a persecutors of the University of Cambridge. 1563, p. 1537, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

Peter Martyr's wife was reburied in Richard Marshall's dunghill after Cardinal Pole ordered him to oversee the exhumation of her body. 1563, p1559., 1570, p. 2153, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

Reginald Pole died the day after Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2136.

[Not related to David Pole.]

 
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Robert Farrer

Haberdasher. Of London.

Robert Farrer frequently visited the Rose tavern in London. 1570, p. 2295, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2294.

He talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2294.

Robert Farrer had two daughters, one of whom was delivered to Sir Roger Cholmley for a sum of money, to be at his commandment, the other sold to Sir William Godolphin, who took her to Boulogne as his lackey, dressed in men's clothing. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2294.

Foxe describes Farrer's character. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2294.

[Not related to Robert Farrer the bishop.]

 
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Sir Henry Jerningham

(d. 1571)

Vice-chamberlain of the royal household; captain of the guard (1553). (DNB)

Sir Henry Jerningham took Elizabeth's lady-in-waiting Katherine Ashley and imprisoned her in the Fleet. 1563, p. 1715, 1570, p. 2295, 1576, p. 1987.

On 15 December 1557 a letter was sent by the archbishop of York, the earl of Shrewsbury, Edward Hastings, Anthony Montague, John Bourne and Henry Jerningham (members of the privy council) to Bishop Bonner along with the examinations of John Rough. They sent Rough to Newgate. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2226, 1576, pp. 1921-22., 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

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Master Jerningham and Thomas Mildmay took Sandys to prison. 1583, p. 2087.

Katherine Ashley was arrested by Jerningham and Norris and imprisoned in the Fleet. 1570, p. 2295, 1576, p. 1987, 1583, p. 2291.

 
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Sir John Baker

(1490? - 1558)

Chancellor of the Exchequer, privy councillor, undersheriff and sheriff of the court of London. MP for Bedford and the City of London. [DNB; Bindoff)]

Sir John Baker believed Bland to be Scottish, but Bland told him he was English, from Sedbar and brought up by Dr Lupton, the provost of Eton.1563, p. 1223, 1570, p. 1847, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, p. 1668.

Sir John Baker and Bland held a conversation over Bland's beliefs 1563, pp. 1223-24, 1570, pp. 1847-48, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, pp. 1668-69.

Bland was taken before Sir John Baker, Master Petit, Master Webbe, and two others whose identity was unknown to Bland. 1563, p. 1223, 1570, p. 1847, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, p. 1668.

Complaints about Richard Turner's sermons were made to Sir John Baker, Sir Christopher Hales, Sir Thomas Moyles. 1570, p. 2043, 1576, p. 1762, 1583, p. 1869.

John Tailor and Thomas Henden complained to the justices about Edmund Allin and he was brought before Sir John Baker. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

John Baker allowed Allin and his wife to spend a night together, during which they decided not to go to chapel and to die together. 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896.

Sir John Baker committed Allin and his wife to ward but for some reason they were later released. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

John Tailor sent the Allins before Sir John Baker for a second time. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

The Allins were sent to Maidstone prison by Sir John Baker. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

Sir John Baker sent John Dove, Thomas Best, Thomas Linley, Percival Barber, John Tailor and Thomas Henden to the Allins' home to make an inventory of their goods. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

Talk took place between Sir John Baker, Collins (his chaplain) and Edmund Allin. 1570, pp. 2165-66, 1576, pp. 1870-71, 1583, pp. 1979-80.

Sir John Baker called Mrs Allin a whore for persuading her husband not to go to chapel. 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896.

Thomas Brice was in the house of John Seal, in Horting, when the bailiff and others, at the commandment of Sir John Baker, were sent to search for him. They knew his stature and the colour of his garments yet somehow did not recognise him and so he escaped. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

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Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 1980.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir John Gage

(1479 - 1556)

Statesman and military commander. MP Sussex (1529, 1539). Lord Chamberlain (1553 - 1556); privy councillor (DNB; Bindoff)

John Gage was one of the privy councillors who signed a letter to Bishop Bonner, dated 28 April 1555, ordering the bishop to proceed posthumously against John Tooley in ecclesiastical court. 1563, p. 1142; 1570, p. 1757; 1576, p. 1500; 1583, p. 1584.

Sir John Gage was an attendant to Elizabeth when she was brought to London under suspicion of involvement in Wyatt's rebellion. 1563, p. 1712, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

He was appointed to go with Elizabeth after her release. 1563, p. 1712, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

[Married the daughter of Sir Richard Guildford of Cranbrook. Father of James and Edward Gage.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Roger Cholmley

(d. 1565)

Lord chief justice of King's and Queen's Bench (1552 - 1553), privy councillor (under Mary) and MP [Bindoff, Commons; Hasler, Commons; DNB]. Judge, lieutenant of the Tower. Son of Sir Richard Cholmley [DNB]

Sir Roger Cholmley persuaded the royal guard to support Northumberland against Mary (1570, p. 1568; 1576, p. 1337; 1583, p. 1407).

He was sent to the Tower, with Sir Edward Montagu, on 27 July 1553 (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1465).

He was released from the Tower together with Sir Edward Montagu on 7 September 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

Sir Roger Cholmley was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Cholmley participated in a debate/dinner conversation between Nicholas Ridley and John Feckenham and Sir John Bourne, on the nature of the eucharist, held while Ridley was a prisoner in the Tower (1563, p. 931; 1570, p. 1591; 1576, pp. 1357-58; and 1583, p. 1428).

Cholmley came to William Flower at the stake and urged Flower, on pain of damnation, to recant his heretical beliefs. 1563, p. 1733; 1570, p. 1749; 1576, p. 1493; 1583, p. 1577.

George Tankerfield was sent into Newgate by Roger Cholmey and Dr Martin. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

Philpot's first examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story, and one of the scribes of the Arches at Newgate Hall, 2 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

Cholmley was one of the commissioners who sent John Went, John Tudson, Thomas Brown and Joan Warren to be examined and imprisoned. 1563, p. 1453, 1570, p. 2016, 1576, p. 1737, 1583, p. 1845.

A complaint about John Tudson was made to Cholmley. 1563, p. 1467, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1749, 1583, p. 1857. [Foxe erroneously calls him 'Sir Richard Cholmley'.]

Cuthbert Symson was brought before Cholmley, examined and racked. 1563, p. 1651, 1570, p. 2229, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2032.

Cholmley sent to Newgate 27 prisoners who were members of an illegal conventicle in Islington. 1563, p. 1659, 1570, p. 2235, 1576, p. 1930, 1583, p. 2037.

Thomas Hinshaw was taken by the constables of Islington to appear before Master Cholmley, who sent him to Newgate. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Robert Farrer, haberdasher of London, had two daughters, one of whom was delivered to Sir Roger Cholmley for a sum of money, to be at his commandment, the other sold to Sir William Godolphin, who took her to Boulogne as his lackey, dressed in men's clothing. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2294.

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The lord mayor of London and Chomley examined Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax. 1563, p. 1683, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

Elizabeth Young's fourth examination was before Bonner, Roger Cholmley, Cooke, Dr Roper of Kent, and Dr Martin. 1570, pp. 2270-71, 1576, pp. 1959-60, 1583, pp. 2066-67.

Tingle was a prisoner in Newgate. His keeper realised that Edward Benet had a New Testament and sent him to Cholmley, who imprisoned him in the Compter for 25 weeks. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Benet was apprehended again in Islington and sent before Cholmley but was cut off from the rest. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

John Story had accused Angel's wife of murdering a woman and her child who resided with her in her house. He sent her to Newgate. Sir Roger Cholmley dismissed the charges against her. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2010.

[Also referred to as 'Lorde Chiefe Baron' or 'Chomley']

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Thomas Pope

(1507? - 1559)

Founder of Trinity College, Oxford. Privy Councillor (before 1544 -1548 and 1553-59). Sheriff of Essex and Hertfordshire (1552 and 1557). (DNB; Bindoff)

Thomas Pope was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

The day before George Tankerfield went to St Albans, a schoolmaster retained by Sir Thomas Pope attempted to persuade Tankerfield on a number of doctrinal points. 1583, p. 1690.

Pope was appointed to go with Elizabeth after her release. 1570, p. 2295, 1576, p. 1987, 1583, p. 2294.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir William Godolphin

(by 1505/06 - 1558)

Bailiff of Boulogne (1544 - 1551). Sheriff of Cornwall (1549 - 1550). JP (1554 - 1570). MP (1539, 1553). Of Goldophin, Cornwall. (Bindoff)

Robert Farrer, haberdasher of London, had two daughters, one of whom was delivered to Sir Roger Cholmley for a sum of money, to be at his commandment, the other sold to Sir William Godolphin, who took her to Boulogne as his lackey, dressed in men's clothing. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2294.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Darbyshire

(1518 - 1604)

Nephew of Edmund Bonner. Jesuit. DCL (1556). Prebend of Totenhall (1543), Hackney (1554). Rector of Fulham (1558) and St Magnus, near London Bridge (1558). Principal of Broadgates College, archdeacon of Essex (1558). Chancellor of London. Deprived of all preferments under Elizabeth. (DNB; Foster)

Darbyshire told Thomas Hawkes that the Bible was sufficient for salvation, but not instruction. 1563, p. 1149; 1570, p. 1759; 1576, p. 1551 [recte 1503]; 1583, p. 1586

On 6 June 1556, Darbyshire, Bonner's chancellor, read articles against Henry Adlington, Thomas Bowyer, Lyon Cawch, John Derifall, Agnes George, William Halliwell, Edmund Hurst, Ralph Jackson, Lawrence Parnam, Elizabeth Pepper, John Routh, George Searles, and Henry Wye. 1563, p. 1524, 1570, p. 2095, 1576, p. 1808, 1583, p. 1914.

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Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2097.

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Five who were martyred at Smithfield on April 12 1557 were first examined by Darbyshire, Bonner's chancellor. 1563, pp. 1567-70, 1570, pp. 2159-61, 1576, pp. 1865-67, 1583, pp. 1974-76.

Ralph Allerton was examined on 7 July by Darbyshire. 1563, p. 1626, 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1908, 1583, p. 2016.

Articles against six martyred at Brentford were administered by Thomas Darbyshire on 20 June 1558. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1935, 1583, p. 2042.

Darbyshire examined William Living and his wife. 1563, p. 1673.

Sentence against them was read by Darbyshire in the presence of Edward Hastings and Thomas Cornwallis. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2241, 1576, p. 1935, 1583, p. 2039.

2121 [2097]

Queene Mary. Gods prouidence in preseruing Lady Elizabeth in Queene Maries tyme.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.gayne, and the seuennight after was released MarginaliaLady Elizabeth by Gods prouidence set at libertye.Syr Henry Benifield discharged.of Sir Henry Benifield her Gaoler (as she termed hym) and his soldiours,  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 621, fn 1

Blomefield, in his "History of Norfolk," vol. iii. p. 481, imagines that Foxe had painted sir Henry Bedingfield's conduct too strongly, because Elizabeth afterwards visited him at Oxburgh in 1578. - ED.

and so her grace beyng set at libertie from imprisonment, went into the countrey, and had appoynted to go with her Sir Thomas Pope, one of Queene Maries Counsailors, and one of her Gentlemen Vshers, Maister Gage, and thus straitly was she looked to all Queene Maries tyme. And this is the discourse of her highnesse imprisonment.

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MarginaliaMistres Ashley sent to the Fleete.
3. Gentlewomē of Lady Elizabethes sent to the Tower.
Then there came to Lamheyre, M. Ierningham, and N. Norris Gentleman Vsher, Queene Maries men, who tooke away from her grace Maistresse Ashley to the Fleete, and three other of her Gentlewomen to the Tower: which thing was no little trouble to her grace, saying: that she thought they would fetche all away at the ende. MarginaliaNote the wonderfull working of the Lordes prouidence in sauing of Lady Elizabeth.
Lady Elizabeth deliuered by the death of Stephen Gardiner.
But god be praysed, shortly after was fetched away Gardiner through the mercifull prouidence of the Lords goodnes, by occasion of whose opportune decease (as is partly touched in this story before, pag. 1705.) the lyfe of this excellent Princesse, the wealth of all England, was preserued. For this is credible to be supposed, that the said wicked Gardiner of Winchester had long laboured his wits, and to this onely most principall marke, bent all hys deuises, to bring this our happy and deare soueraigne out of the way, as both by his words and doyngs before notified, may sufficiently appeare.

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But such was the gracious and fauourable prouidēce of the Lord, to the preseruation not onely of her royal maiestie, but also the miserable and woful state of this whole Iland, and poore subiectes of the same, whereby the proud platformes and peeuish practises of this wretched Achitophel preuayled not: but contrarywise, both he, and all the snares and trappes of his pernicious counsaile layed agaynst another, were turned to a net to catche hymselfe, accordyng to the Prouerbe: Malum consilium, consultori pessimum. 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Varro, Res Rusticae, 3. 2. 1.
Foxe text Latin

Malum consilium consultori pessimum

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

Translation (Wade 2004)

Bad advice is very bad for a counsellor

Actual text of Varro, Res Rusticae, 3. 2. 1


candidati tabella dimidiata aedificemus nobis? Opinor, inquam, non solum, quod dicitur,
malum consilium consultori est pessimum, sed etiam bonum consilium,
qui consulit et qui consulitur, bonum habendum.

[cf. A. Otto, 1890, p. 90]

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MarginaliaHow the Lord here beganne to worke for Lady Elizabeth.After the death of this Gardiner, followed the death also and droppyng away of other her enemies, whereby by little and litle her ieoperdy decreased, feare didminished, hope of comfort began to appeare as out of a darke cloud: and albeit as yet her grace had no full assurance of perfect safetie, yet more gentle intertainment daily did grow vnto her, till at length to the moneth of Nouember, and xvij. of the same, three yeares after the death of Ste. Gardiner, followed the death of Queene Mary, as hereafter God graunting shall be more declared.

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MarginaliaA note of a story declaring the malignant harts of the Papistes toward Lady Elizabeth.Although this history followyng bee not directly appertaining to the former matter, yet the same may here not vnaptly be inserted, for that it doth discouer and shew forth the malicious heartes of the Papistes toward this vertuous Queene our soueraigne Lady in the tyme of Queene Mary her sister, which is reported, as a truth credibly tolde by sundry honest persones, of whome some are yet alyue, and doe testifie the same. The matter wherof is this.

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Soone after the sturre of Wiate and the troubles that happened to this Queene for that cause: it fortuned one MarginaliaRobert Farrer of London a sore enemy to Lady Elizabeth.Robert Farrer a Haberdasher of London, dwelling nere vnto Newgate market, in a certaine mornyng to be at the Rose tauerne (from whence he was seldome absent) and falling to his common drinke, as he was euer accustomed and hauing in his company three other companions lyke to himselfe, it chaunced the same tyme one MarginaliaLaurence Sheriffe, sworne friend and seruaunt to Lady Elizabeth his Mistres.Laurence Shiriffe  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 622, fn 2

Laurence Sheriff was the founder of Rugby school. - ED.

Grocer, dwelling also not farre from thence, to come into the said Tauerne, and finding there the sayde Farrer (to whom of long time he had borne good will) sate down in the seat to drinke with him, and Farrer hauyng in hys full cups, and not hauing consideration who were present began to talke at large, & namely against the Lady Elizabeth, and said: MarginaliaRober Farrer rayleth agaynst Lady Elizabeth.that Gill hath bene one of the chiefe doers of this rebellion of Wiat, and before all be done, she and al the heretikes her pertakers, shall well vnderstand of it. Some of them hope that she shal haue the crowne, but she and they (I trust) that so hope, shall hop hedlesse, or be fried with Fagots before she come to it.

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MarginaliaThe parte of a good trusty seruaunt.The aforesaid Laurence Shiriffe Grocer, beyng then seruaunt vnto the sayd Lady Elizabeth, and sworne vnto her grace, could no longer forbeare his olde acquaintance and neighbour Farrer in speaking so vnreuerently of his Mistres, but sayd vnto him: Farrer, I haue loued thee as a neighbour, and haue had a good opiniō of thee, but hearing of thee that I now heare, I defie thee: and I tel thee I am her graces sworne seruaunt, and she is a Princesse, and the daughter of a noble kyng, and it euill becommeth thee to call her a Gill, & for thy so saying, I say thou art a knaue, and I will complain vpon thee. Do thy worst said

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Farrer, for that I said, I will say againe, and so Shiriffe came from his company.

MarginaliaRobert Farrer complayned of to the Cōmissioners, but no redresse was had.Shortly after the said Shirife taking an honest neighbour with him, went before the Commissioners to complaine: the which Commissioners sate then at Boner the Bishop of Londons house beside Paules, and there were present Boner then beyng the chiefe Commissioner, the L. Mordant, sir Iohn Baker, D. Darbishiere Chauncellour to the Bishop, Doctour Story, Doctour Harpsfield, and other.

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The aforesayd Shiriffe commyng before them, declared the maner of the sayd Rob. Farrers talke agaynst the Lady Elizabeth. Boner answered, peraduēture you tooke him worse then he ment.

Yea my L. sayd D. Story, if you knew the man as I do, you would say there is not a better Catholike, nor an honester man in the Citie of London.

Well, sayd Sheriffe, my Lord, she is my gracious Lady and mistres, and it is not to be suffered that such a varlet as he is, should call so honorable a princes by the name of a Gil: And I saw yesterday in the Court that my Lord Cardinall Poole meeting her in the Chamber of presence, kneeled downe on his knees and kissed her hand, & I saw also that King Philippe meeting her, made her such obeisance that his knee touched the groūd: and then me thinketh it were too much to suffer suche a varlet as this is, to call her Gill, and to wish them to hop headlesse that shall wish her grace to enioy the possession of the crowne when God shall sende it vnto her as in the right of her inheritaunce. Yea? stay there quoth Boner. When God sendeth it vnto her, let her enioy it. MarginaliaHow Bysh. Boner and D. Story beare with him that rayled agaynst Lady Elizabeth.But truely (sayde he) the man that spake the woordes that you haue reported, meant nothing against the Ladie Elizabeth your Mistresse, and no more doe we: but he like an honest and zealous man feared the alteration of Religion, whiche euery good manne ought to feare: and therefore (sayde Boner) good man goe your wayes home and reporte well of vs towarde youre Mistresse, and we will send for Farrer and rebuke him for his rash and vndiscrete woordes, and we trust he will not doe the like againe. And thus Sheriffe came awaye, and Farrer had a flappe with a foxe taile.

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MarginaliaNote the vngodly lyfe of these Catholickes.Nowe that yee may be fully informed of the aforesaid Farrer, whom D. Story praised for so good a man, ye shal vnderstande that the same Farrer hauing two daughters being handsome maidens, the Elder of them for a summe of money he him selfe deliuered to Syr Roger Cholmley to be at his commandement, the other he sold to a Knight called Syr William Gooddolphin to be at his commandement: whom he made his lackie and so caried her wt hym, being apparelled in mans apparel to Bolein, and the sayd Farrar followed the Campe. He also was a greate, and a horrible blasphemer of God, and a common accuser of honest and quiet men, also a common dronkarde. And nowe I referre the life of these Catholickes to your iudgement, to thinke of them as you please.

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But of this matter enough and too much. Now let vs retourne where we left before, which was at the deathe of Quene Marie. MarginaliaLady Elizabeth proclamed Queene the same day that Quene Mary dyed.After whose decease succeeded her foresayd sister Ladie Elizabeth into the right of the crown of England: who after so long restrainement, so great daungers escaped, suche blusterous stormes ouerblowne, so many iniuries digested and wronges sustained by the mightye protection of our mercifull God, to our no small comforte and commoditie, hath ben exalted and erected out of thrall to Libertie, out of daunger to Peace and quietnesse, from dread to Dignitie, from miserie to Maiestie, from mourning to Ruling. Briefly, of a prisonner made a Princesse, and placed in her throne Royal proclaimed now Quene, with as many glad hearts of her subiects, as euer was any King or Queene in this Realme before her, or euer shall be (I dare say) heereafter. MarginaliaThe Lord make England thankfull to him for his great benefites.

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Touching whose florishing state, her Princely reigne and peaceable gouernment, with other things diuers and sondrye incident to the same, and especiallye touching the great stirres & alterations which haue happened in other foreine nations, and also partly among our selues here at home, for so muche as the tractation heereof requireth an other Volume by it selfe, I shall therefore deferre the reader to the next Booke or Section insuing: wherein (if the Lorde so please to sustaine me with leaue and life) I may haue to discourse of all and singulare suche matters done and atchieued in these our latter daies and memorie, more at large.

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Now then after these so great afflictions falling vpon this Realm, from the first beginning of Queene Maries reigne, wherein so many men, women, and children were burned, many imprisoned and in prisones starued, diuers exiled, some spoyled of goodes & possessions, a great num-

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