Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Berry

(d. 1549) Servant to Sir Walter Mildmay

William Ombler, Thomas Dale, Henry Barton and Robert Dale took Matthew White, Clopton, Savage and Berry, murdered them, stripped their bodies and left them in a field. 1570, p. 1500; 1576, p. 1272; 1583, p. 1309.

 
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Griffith Leyson

(d. 1555)

Sheriff of Camarthenshire (1555). Dean of the Court of Arches. JP in Hereford and Shropshire (1555) [SP11/5, no. 6] [See Brown, Robert Ferrar, pp. 238-39, 246-47.]

Griffith Leyson escorted Robert Ferrar to his first hearing before Henry Morgan and surrendered custody of Ferrar to Morgan. 1563, p. 1098; 1570, p. 1723; 1576, p. 1471; 1583, p. 1554.

Griffith Leyson took the cattle from Ferrar's servant, Matthew Harbottle, but the cattle got sick and died. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2136.

He supervised Robert Ferrar's execution. 1563, p. 1100; 1570, p. 1724; 1576, p. 1472; 1583, p. 1555.

Leyson refused to allow Ferrar to speak at his execution. Leyson later became ill and unable to speak at the time of his death. 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2136.

[NB: Leyson had been an inveterate opponent of Ferrar in Edward VI's reign; see Andrew J. Brown, Robert Ferrar (London, 1997), pp. 180, 208-9 and 238-39].

 
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Henry Morgan

(d. 1559)

Bishop of St David's (1554 - 1559). (DNB)

Henry Morgan was appointed to support Thomas Watson in the disputes in the 1553 convocation. He debated with James Haddon, Richard Cheney and debated very extensively with John Philpot (1563, pp. 912-16; 1570, pp. 1576-78; 1576, pp. 1344-47; 1583, pp. 1415-17).

He was appointed Bishop of St David's c. January 1554, (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1369; 1583, p. 1467).

Together with Edmund Bonner and Gilbert Bourne, Morgan condemned Thomas Tomkins on 9 February 1555. 1563, p. 1103; 1570, p. 1712; 1576, pp. 1461-62; 1583, p. 1535.

He interrogated and tried Robert Ferrar in Carmarthen 26 February - 11 March 1555. Morgan condemned Ferrar on 13 March 1555. 1563, pp. 1098-1100; 1570, pp. 1723-24; 1576, pp. 1471-72; 1583, pp. 1554-55.

Philpot's eighth examination was before Bonner, John Harpsfield, St David's, Mordant and others. 1563, pp. 1419-20, 1570, pp. 1982-83, 1576, pp. 1705-06, 1583, p. 1814.

John Rough, in the presence of the bishop of London, the bishop of St David's and John Feckenham, was degraded and condemned. 1563, p. 1648, 1570, p. 2227, 1576, p. 1923, 1583, p. 2030.

After his condemnation of Ferrar, Henry Morgan fell ill and suffered greatly until his death. 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

He died after Queen Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

[1563, p. 1704, incorrectly lists him among those who died before Queen Mary.]

 
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John Cooper

Carpenter. Of Wattisham, Suffolk.

John Cooper was first accused of high treason for speaking against Queen Mary. He was arrested and taken to Henry Doyle by Master Timperley of Hintlesham, Suffolk, and Grimwood of Lawshall, constable. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

At Bury St Edmunds, Clement Higham met with the witnesses against Cooper, Richard White of Wattisham and Grimwood of Hitcham, Suffolk. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

Cooper was condemned to be hanged, drawn and quartered as an example to others. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

At his death John Cooper left a wife and nine children, with goods and cattle to the value of 300 marks, which was removed from Cooper's family by Sir Henry Doyle. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

[See Thomas S. Freeman, 'Fate, Fact and Fiction in Foxe's Book of Martyrs' in Historical Journal 43.3 (2000), pp. 603-10.]

 
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Matthew Harbottle

(fl. 1555 - 1569)

Servant to Robert Ferrar of St David's.

Sheriff Leyson took cattle from Ferrar's servant, Matthew Harbottle, but the cattle got sick and died. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2136.

[In June 1555 Harbottle sued Griffith Leyson in the Camarthen court of Great Sessions for removing goods and chattels to the value of 20 marks from his property by violence. The case was never resolved due to Leyson's sudden death. Harbottle was alive as late as 1569 when a lease of an advowson to him was ratified by the cathedral chapter of St David's. See Andrew J. Brown, Robert Ferrar: Yorkshire Monk, Reformation Bishop and Martyr in Wales (c.1550-1555) (London, 1997), pp. 246-47, 326.]

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Michael Dunning

Chancellor of Norwich (1554 - 1558?) [Fasti; DCL, 1555; Venn]

Michael Dunning is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

Robert Samuel was cruelly treated by Dr Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and/or Dr Dunnings, the chancellor [Foxe is not sure]. 1563, p. 1270, 1570, p. 1898, 1576, p. 1609, 1583, p. 1703.

Thomas Cobbe was examined by Dunning but condemned by the bishop of Norwich with Roger Coo, William Allen, James Abbes, and Robert Samuel. He was burned at Thetford in September 1556. 1563, p. 1271, 1570, p. 1884, 1576, pp. 1613-14 , 1583, p. 1708.

Dunning made a visitation to Ipswich in 1556. He examined Peter and Anne Moone. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

He interrupted the examination of Peter Moone and his wife to tell Hopton that several prisoners (whom he described as 'heretics and Anabaptists') had been brought from Boxford, Lavenham, and the cloth country.1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

As they went to leave after their examination, Dunning told Peter Moone and his wife that they had to see him, for he was sure that they were heretics. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Edmund Poole was examined by Dunning, chancellor of Norwich, and Mings, the registrar of the town of Beccles.1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Hopton and Dunning left Ipswich without reexamining Anne and Peter Moone. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

After Thomas Spicer was examined and condemned by Dunning he was handed over to Sir John Silliard. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

John Denny was examined by Dunning, chancellor of Norwich, and Mings, the registrar of the town of Beccles.1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

A papist brought Simon Miller before Dunning, who spoke with him and then committed him to ward. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

During his examination, Miller's confession was discovered hidden in his shoe. Miller reaffirmed his confession before Dunning. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Crashfield was first examined by Dunning. 1563, p. 1616, 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

Crashfield was again examined by Dunning and Brydges, at which time he was asked to speak with Dr Pore. 1563, p. 1617, 1570, p. 2205, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2011.

Crashfield was condemned by Dunning. 1563, p. 1617, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2011.

On 23 July 1557 Cicely Ormes was called before Dunning and Brydges, at which time she was condemned. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

Ormes wrote to Dunning about her recantation. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

Noyes was condemned by the bishop of Norwich before Dunning, Sir W. Woodhouse, Sir Thomas Woodhouse, George Heyden, Master Spense, W. Farrar (alderman), Master Thurston, Winesden and others. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

Thomas Spurdance was examined before Michael Dunning, chancellor of Norwich. 1563, pp. 1634-36, 1570, pp. 2220-21, 1576, pp. 1916-17, 1583, p. 2024.

Michael Dunning died in Lincolnshire while sitting in a chair. . 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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Rawlins White

(1495? - 1555)

Fisherman, martyr

In the 1563 edition there is only one sentence about Rawlins White; it states that he was burned on 5 March 1555 in Cardiff. 1563, p. 1101.

White was converted to protestantism in the reign of Edward VI and became an itinerant lay preacher. He headed conventicles in Mary's reign in the region around Cardiff. 1570, p. 1726; 1576, pp. 1473-80 [recte 1474]; 1583, pp. 1556-57.

After being imprisoned for three weeks after sentence was pronounced, White was burned in Cardiff in March 1555. He died with remarkable courage. 1570, pp. 1727-29; 1576, p. 1463 [recte 1475]-1476; 1583, pp. 1558-59.

 
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Richard Thornden

(d. 1558)

Suffragan Bishop of Dover (1545-1558) [ODNB]

Richard Thornden is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

On 13 June 1555 John Bland was brought before Thornden. 1563, p. 1229, 1570, pp. 1851-52, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, p. 1672.

Bland asked that the bishop of Dover and Master Collins be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

On 20 June, Bland was reexamined, his articles read by the bishop of Dover and Bland's answers made. 1563, p. 1229.

Bland referred to Thornden's library as a source for texts for any discussion of scripture. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Thornden stated that Bland had preached many heresies. Faucet wais present during this discussion. 1563, p. 1225, 1570, p. 1849, 1576, p. 1582, 1583, p. 1670.

Bland asked that Richard Thornden, bishop of Dover, and Robert Collins, commissary, be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Nicholas Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Cyriac Pettit was present during the disputation between Bland and Nicholas Harpsfield on 21 May 1555. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

On 28 May Nicholas Harpsfield had the mayor's sergeant bring Bland and Master Collins (comissary) before him, in Thornden's house. 1563, pp. 1220-21, 1570, pp. 1845-46, 1576, pp. 1579-80, 1583, p. 1667.

On 13 June [1555] Bland was brought before Richard Thornden, Robert Collins and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1229, 1570, pp. 1851-52, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, p. 1672.

Thornden asked Bland if he knew of Oecolompadius and Zwingli, to which Bland responded that he had seen 'parte of their doinges'. 1563, p. 1226, 1570, p. 1850, 1576, p. 1583, 1583, p. 1671.

On 20 June Bland was reexamined and his articles read by Richard Thornden. Bland's answers were made and condemnation given. 1563, pp. 1229-30, 1570, p. 1852, 1576, p. 1582, 1583, pp. 1672-73.

Bland was condemned by Dover. 1563, p. 1230, 1570, p. 1852, 1576, p. 1582, 1583, pp. 1672-73.

Bland, Sheterden and Middleton were condemned on 25 June 1555. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

He examined and condemned John Frankesh. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

He examined and condemned Humphrey Middleton. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

He took part in the last examination of Nicholas Sheterden and condemned him on 25 June 1555. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

Thornden examined and condemned William Cokar. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He examined Richard Colliar. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He condemned Colliar on either 26 June, 26 July (1570, p. 1859,1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678) or16 August 1555 (1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688).

He examined and condemned William Hopper. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He condemned Hopper on 26 June or 26 July 1555 (1570, p. 1859,1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678) or 16 July 1555 (1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688).

He examined and condemned Henry Laurence. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He condemned Laurence on 26 June or 26 July (1570, p. 1859,1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678) or 2 August 1555 (1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688).

He examined and condemned William Sterne. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

Thornden was referred to by William Sterne as 'Dick of Dover'. 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

Thornden examined and condemned Richard Wright. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

George Catmer, Robert Streater, George Brodbridge, Anthony Burwarde and James Tutty, martyrs, were examined by the bishop of Dover. 1563, p. 1273, 1570, p. 1884, 1576, p. 1613, 1583, p. 1707.

John Web was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden. 1563, pp. 1386-87, 1570, pp. 1959-60, 1576, p. 1687, 1583, p. 1794.

A mass was said at Canterbury by Thornden after the death of Edward VI. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

John Newman was apprehended in Kent and examined there by Thornden and others at Tenterden. 1570, p. 2134, 1576, p. 1856, 1583, pp. 1686-87, p. 1950.

Newman was brought before Bonner and condemned with Denley and Packingham. Newman wrote a letter to Thornden about his conduct and doctrine. 1570, p. 2134, 1576, p. 1856, 1583, p. 1950.

Thornden is described as a great persecutor. 1563, p. 1546, 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1954.

Thornden condemned John Philpot of Tenterden, William Hay of Hythe, Thomas Hudson of Selling, Matthew Bradbridge of Tenterden, Thomas Stephens of Biddenden, Nicholas Final of Tenterden, William Lowick of Cranbrooke, and William Prowting of Thornham. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].]

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Joan Bradbridge, Walter Apelbye of Maidstone, Petronyll, his wife, Edmund Allin of Frittenden, Katherine,his wife, Joan Mannings, wife of Maidstone, Elizabeth, a blind maiden were all examined by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1570, 1570, p. 2161, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1976.

Edward Benden petitioned the wealthy men of Staplehurst to write to Thornden, bishop of Dover, asking that his wife, Alice Benden, be released. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Benden told Thornden that his wife was being manipulated by her brother, Roger Hall, who gave her money, comforted her, and persuaded her not to attend mass. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Benden told Thornden that she would not be shriven by her parish priest if sent home. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Thornden released her, telling her to go to church 'when thou wilt'. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Thornden sent Alice Benden to 'Monday's Hole' prison. Her brother had great difficulty in finding where she was imprisoned but eventually found her five weeks after she had been moved. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

On 25 March 1557 Alice Benden was called before Thornden, who asked her to relent. She refused, telling him that his treatment of her was not of God. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Thornden sent her to Westgate, where she was cleaned up, but her skin was so poor and her body so weak, that she could hardly walk and her skin peeled away. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

She remained at Westgate until the end of April, when she was brought before Thornden and condemned. She was then sent to the Castle. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Martin Bradbridge was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Final was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Hay was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Thomas Hudson was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Stephen Kempe was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Lowick was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

John Philpot of Tenterden was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Matthew Plaise was examined by Thornden, Nicholas Harpsfield and Collins. 1570, pp. 2169-71, 1576, pp. 1873-75, 1583, pp. 1982-83.

William Prowting was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Thomas Stephens was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Waterman was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Joan Bradbridge had two children, Patience and Charity. She asked Thornden to protect them after her death but he refused. 1570, p. 2169, 1576, p. 1873, 1583, p. 1981.

Thornden was taken with a palsy whilst watching a game of bowls at Bourne. 1563, p. 1706, 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

Thornden died in the pulpit after giving pardon and remission of sins to his congregation. 1563, p. 1705.

[Referred to as 'Thorton' and 'Dick of Dover'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Ferrar

(d. 1555)

Bishop of St David's (1547 - 1554) and martyr (DNB).

Foxe gives a brief summary of Ferrar's career. Foxe calls him a double martyr because of the tribulations he endured in the reigns of both Edward VI and Mary. 1563, p. 1084; 1570, pp. 1121-22; 1576, p. 1470; 1583, p. 1544.

Articles accusing Ferrar of various offences were sent to the privy council in 1551 by Hugh Rawlins and Thomas Lee. 1563, pp. 1055-58; 1583, pp. 1544-46. [These articles were summarised in 1570, p. 1722; 1576, p. 1470.] Ferrar's answers to these articles are given in 1563, pp. 1088-93; 1583, pp. 1546-50). [These answers were summarised in 1570, p. 1722; 1576, p. 1470.] Ferrar's exceptions to the witnesses against him and 'matters justificatory' against him are given in 1563, pp. 1093-96; 1583, pp. 1550-52. [These are summarised in 1570, p. 1722; 1576, p. 1470.]

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Ferrar sent letters to the lord chancellor Thomas Goodrich defending himself and denouncing George Constantine and his other enemies. 1563, pp. 1096-98; 1570, pp. 1725-26; 1576, pp. 1472-80 [recte 1474]; 1583, pp. 1555-56.

Ferrar was imprisoned throughout the remainder of Edward VI's reign. 1563, p. 1098; 1583, p. 1553. [In 1570, p. 1722 and 1576, pp. 1470-71, Foxe states that Ferrar 'was deteined in custody under sureties' which is much closer to being correct. For proof that Ferrar was not imprisoned during Edward VI's reign, see Andrew J. Brown, Robert Ferrar (London, 1997), pp. 216-18.]

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Ferrar was imprisoned under Mary. 1563, p. 1732; 1570, pp. 1722-23; 1576, p. 1471; 1583, p. 1553.

On 6 May 1554, John Hooper sent Ferrar, John Philpot, John Bradford and Rowland Taylor a letter discussing a proposed disputation in Cambridge in which they would represent the protestants. 1570, p. 1687; 1576, p. 1440; 1583, p. 1513.

Ferrar was one of the signatories to a letter of 8 May 1554 protesting against the proposed disputation at Cambridge. The letter is printed in 1563, pp. 1001-3; 1570, p. 1639; 1576, pp. 1399-1400; 1583, pp. 1469-71.

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Ferrar and his fellow prisoners, John Bradford, John Philpot and Rowland Taylor. 1570, pp. 1671-72; 1576, p. 1426; 1583, p. 1500.

In a letter William Tyms wrote to 'God's faithful servants', he named his fellow prisoners in the King's Bench as Robert Ferrar, Rowland Taylor, John Philpot, John Bradford and five other Sussex men. 1570, p. 2082, 1576, p. 1795, 1583, p. 1902.

Ferrar was brought before Stephen Gardiner at St Mary Ovary's on 30 January 1555. He was not examined and was sent back to prison (1570, p. 1655; 1576, p. 1412; 1583, p. 1483).

He was one of the authors of a petition to Philip and Mary asking that they allow protestant ministers to defend the Edwardian religious reforms in public debate (1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1483).

Ferrar was sent to Carmarthen on 14 February 1555 for trial and execution. 1563, p. 1732; 1570, pp. 1705 and 1722-23; 1576, pp. 1456 and 1471; 1583, pp. 1529 and 1553-54.

Ferrar's hearings and trial in Carmarthen, from 26 February to 11 March 1555, are recounted. 1563, pp. 1098-99; 1570, pp. 1723-24; 1576, pp. 1471-72; 1583, pp. 1554-55.

Ferrar was condemned and degraded on 13 March 1555. 1563, pp. 1099-1100; 1570, p. 1724; 1576, p. 1472; 1583, p. 1555.

Ferrar would have taken the sacrament if not for John Bradford's intervention. 1563, p. 1174, 1570, p. 1781, 1576, p. 1521, 1583, p. 1604.

The night before he was transferred to Newgate he had a dream about the chain for burning him. He was transferred on the Saturday night / Sunday morning and burned at Smithfield the following Monday. 1563, p. 1174, 1570, p. 1781, 1576, p. 1521, 1583, p. 1604.

Ferrar was executed in Carmarthen on 30 March 1555. 1563, p. 1100; 1570, p. 1724; 1576, p. 1472; 1583, p. 1555.

He was mentioned in Bradford's letter to Lady Fane. 1570, p. 1824, 1576, p. 1560, 1583, p. 1642.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. Ridley mentioned that he knew that Ferrar had been martyred. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

Robert Ferrar was examined before the bishops of Durham and Worcester, Sir Richard Southwell and Gilbert Bourne. 1563, p. 1732, 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2136.

Dr Leyson refused to let him speak at the stake. 1563, p. 1736, 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2136.

[Also referred to as 'Farrer' and as 'Robert Menaven'. 'Menaven' is an abbreviation for the Latin name of Ferrar's diocese of St David's; as is the custom, Ferrar's signature was in Latin with his first name and the name of his diocese.]

[Not related to Robert Farrer, haberdasher.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Clement Higham

(by 1495 - 1571)

Of Barrow, Suffolk. MP for Rye (1553), Ipswich (1554), West Looe (1554), Lancaster (1555). Chief bailiff of Bury St Edmunds, JP Suffolk (1529 - 1571). (Bindoff)[SP11/5, no. 6].

Robert Pygot appeared before the judge, Sir Clement Higham, who sent him to Ely prison until his execution. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621,1583, p. 1715.

The examination of John Fortune was carried out by Bishop Hooper, aided by Doctor Parker, Master Foster and Master Hygham. 1570, p. 2100, 1576, p. 1812, 1583, p. 1918.

David and John Henry, Philip Humphrey were arrested for heresy. The writ for Humphrey's burning was signed by Sir Clement Higham. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2249, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

Alice Driver rebuked Queen Mary, for which the chief justice, Sir Clement Higham, ordered her ears to be cut off. 1563, p. 1670, 1570, p. 2247, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2048.

At Bury St Edmunds, Clement Higham met with the witnesses against Cooper, Richard White of Wattisham and Grimwood of Hitcham, Suffolk. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

Cooper was condemned to be hanged, drawn and quartered as an example to others. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Henry Doyle [or Dowell]

(d. 1561)

Sheriff of Suffolk, JP for Suffolk (1555) [SP11/5, no. 6; Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Philip and Mary, 3, 139], Pond Hall, Suffolk. [See Diarmaid MacCulloch, Suffolk and the Tudors: Politics and Religion in an English County 1500-1600 (Oxford, 1986), pp. 27, 93, 167. JP 87, 171 in app. 1.]

Rowland Taylor, while rector of Hadleigh, used to call on Doyle at least once a fortnight to visit almshouses with him (1563, p. 1078; 1576, p. 1453; 1583, p. 1526).

Doyle was ordered by the privy council on 26 March 1554 to, together with Foster, arrest Rowland Taylor and Henry Askew and to send them to the council (1583, p. 1428).

Sir Henry Doyle, the sheriff of Ipswich, was offended by Driver's and Gouch's psalm singing at their execution. He asked the bailiffs to ask them to be silent. Richard Smart, one of the bailiff's, bade them do so to no avail. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

Sir Henry Doyle sent one of his own men, Richard Cove, to bid Driver and Gouch be silent. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

When Driver and Gouch were tied to the stake, several people crowded around them, despite Doyle's threats to arrest them. None were arrested. 1563, p. 1672, 1570, p. 2248, 1576, p. 1942, 1583, p. 2049.

John Cooper was first accused of high treason for speaking against Queen Mary. He was arrested and taken to Henry Doyle by Master Timperley of Hintlesham, Suffolk, and Grimwood of Lawshall, constable. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

At his death John Cooper left a wife and nine children, with goods and cattle to the value of 300 marks, which was removed from Cooper's family by Sir Henry Doyle. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

Richard Yeoman was set in the stocks after his capture. Yeoman met with John Dale in the cage, who had been there for three or four days and remained there until Sir Henry Doyle, a justice, came to Hadleigh. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Newall urged Doyle to take Dale and Yeoman to prison. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Doyle believed that Dale and Yeoman should not be punished for more than a day or two. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Doyle believed that Dale should be released immediately. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Doyle submitted to Newall's requests eventually and signed the writ for them to be taken to Bury jail. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

[Foxe calls him 'Doell' or 'Doyll'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Richard Morgan

(d. 1556)

Chief Justice of the Common Pleas; Privy Councillor (DNB; Bindoff, Commons)

Sir Richard Morgan was on the commission which tried Lady Jane Grey. According to Foxe, he fell mad as a providential punishment for judging Lady Jane Grey. This is in Foxe's section on the providential punishment of persecutors. (1563, p. 1704; 1570, p. 2298; 1576, p. 1990; and 1583, p. 2099).

In a more elaborate version of the story, which appears in the narrative of Jane Grey's martyrdom, Morgan fell mad and in his raving 'cried out continually to have the Lady Jane taken away from hym, and so ended his life' (1570, p. 1585; 1576, p. 1352; and 1583, p. 1423).

Ridley reported in a letter to Cranmer written in the aftermath of the Oxford Disputations of April 1554, that Morgan had gone mad (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1464).

[NB: Interestingly, this story may have had some foundation in fact; see Bindoff, Commons].

Foxe appended a marginal note to Ridley's comment, tying Morgan's madness to his condemning Lady Jane Grey to death: 'Thys Justice Morgan gave sentence agaynst Lady Jane', (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1464).

Morgan was on the commission which deprived John Hooper of his bishoprics; during the deprivationMorgan upbraided Hooper for his punishments of religious offenders while he had been Bishop of Gloucester (1563, pp. 1054-55; 1570, pp. 1678-79; 1576, pp. 1432-33; 1583, p. 1605).

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Hudson

(1528? - 1558)

Glover. Martyr. Of Aylsham, Norfolk.

Thomas Hudson was married with three children. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2036.

He was taught to read English by Anthony and Thomas Norgate, of the same town. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2036.

He hid among his faggots for around six months to avoid persecution. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2036.

The vicar of Aylsham, Berry, inquired of Hudson's whereabouts to Hudson's wife, threatening to have her burned if she did not reveal his whereabouts. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2036.

Hudson walked about the town for three days decrying the mass before returning home to prayer and fast. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2036.

Thomas Hudson's neighbour, John Crouch, went to the constables, Robert Marsham and Robert Lawes, to expose Hudson, and Berry commanded a watch to be made for Hudson. Hudson was eventually caught on 22 April 1558. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

Hudson appeared before Berry (who was also commissary), who railed against him. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

Richard Cliffar begged Berry to be kind to Thomas Hudson. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

Berry sent Thomas Hudson before Hopton. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

Hudson was burned at Norwich on 19 May 1558. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Timperley

(1523/24 - 1594)

Of Hintlesham, Suffolk and Flitcham, Norfolk. MP for Bramber (1553), Great Yarmouth (1563). Comptroller of the household of Thomas, fourth Duke of Norfolk (1569), receiver, Suffolk, for 4th duke of Norfolk (by 1572), for Philip, 13th earl of Arundel (by 1589). (Bindoff)

John Cooper was first accused of high treason for speaking against Queen Mary. He was arrested and taken to Henry Doyle by Master Timperley of Hintlesham, Suffolk, and Grimwood of Lawshall, constable. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Fenning

Of Wattisham, Suffolk.

William Fenning wanted to buy two bullocks from John Cooper but Cooper would not sell. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1990. 1583, p. 2101.

Disgruntled that Cooper would not sell him two bullocks, Fenning accused Cooper of high treason. 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

Sometime between 1559 and 1576, William Fenning became the vicar of Wenhuston, Suffolk. He was presented before Justice William Hummerston for defaming the women of his parish and forced to apologise publicly in his own church. 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101. See Thomas S. Freeman, 'Fate, Faction and Fiction in Foxe's Book of Martyrs', Historical Journal, 43.3 (2000), pp. 603-10.]

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William Grimwood

(fl. 1558 - 1585)

Of Hitcham, Suffolk.

John Cooper was first accused of high treason for speaking against Queen Mary. He was arrested and taken to Henry Doyle by Master Timperley of Hintlesham, Suffolk, and Grimwood of Lawshall, constable. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

At Bury St Edmunds, Clement Higham met with the witnesses against Cooper, Richard White of Wattisham and Grimwood of Hitcham, Suffolk. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

Grimwood's bowels allegedly fell out of his body as divine retribution. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

[Grimwood, alive in 1585, sued a minister (unsuccessfully) for libel, for relating this story in a sermon. See Thomas S. Freeman, 'Fate, Faction and Fiction in Foxe's Book of Martyrs', Historical Journal, 43.3 (2000), pp. 601-01.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Berry [Bury]
NGR: SD 805 105

A parish, comprising the market town of Bury, 3 chapelries and 2 townships in the hundred of Salford, and 5 townships in the higher division of the hundred of Blackburn, county Palatine of Lancaster, 9 miles north-north-west from Manchester. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Chester.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Bourne, Kent
Borne
NGR: TR 195 565

As there is a series of 'Bournes' in this area, eg Bekesbourne, Bekesbourne Hill, Littlebourne, Patrixbourne,suggest:

TR 195 565

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Bury St. Edmunds
Berry, Burie, Bury, Burye, S. Edmondsbury, Saint Edmundes Bury, Sainte Edmundes Burye, S. Edmunds Bury, S. Edmundsbury
NGR: TL 853 649

A borough and market town, having exclusive jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Thingoe, county of Suffolk. 26.5 miles north-west by north from Ipswich. The monastery at the dissolution was worth £2336 16s. per annum. Bury comprises the parishes of St. Mary and St. James. The living of each is a donative in the patronage of the mayor and corporation.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Greenwich [Grenwich]
NGR: TQ 388 775

Market Town and parish in the hundred of Blackheath, Lathe of Sutton-at-Hone, County of Kent. 6 miles east-south-east of London. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Rochester. A royal residence was established here by Edward I, and was in use throughout the Tudor period. The palace having become decayed was demolished by Charles II, who intended to replace it.

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Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

The reason for the use of this work of reference is that it presents the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take this reference as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Higham
Higham, Hitcham
NGR: TM 035 356

A parish in the hundred of Samford, county of Suffolk. 4.75miles south from Hadleigh. The living is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Suffolk, diocese of Norwich

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Hintlesham
Hinchlesam, Hincklesam
NGR: TM 087 434

A parish in the hundred of Samford, county of Suffolk. 4.5 miles east by north from Hadleigh. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry of Suffolk, diocese of Norwich

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Lowshaw
Lowshaw
NGR:

Unidentified

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Wattisham
Watsam
NGR: TM 013 515

A parish in the hundred of Cosford, county of Suffolk. 2 miles north-east from Bilderston. The living is a perpetual curacy in the Archdeaconry of Sudbury, diocese of Norwich

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2123 [2099]

Queene Mary. Gods punishment vpon persecutors, and contemners of the Gospell.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.uour prouoked agaynst her, would not yet cease her persecution, but stil continued more and more to reuenge her Catholicke zeale vpon the Lordes faithfull people, setting fire to theyr poore bodyes by dosens and halfedosens together. Where vpon Gods wrathfull indignatipn increasing more and more agaynst her, ceased not to touche her more neare with priuate misfortunes and calamities. For after that he had taken from her the fruit of children (whiche chiefly and aboue all thinges she desired) then he bereft her of that, which of all earthly thinges should haue bene her chiefe stay of honor, and staffe of comfort, that is, MarginaliaQ. Mary left desolate of king Phillip her husband.withdrew from her the affectiō and company euen of her owne husband, by whose mariage she had promised before to her selfe whole heapes of such ioy & felicity: but now the omnipotent gouernour of all thinges so turned the wheele of her owne spinning agaynst her, that her high buildinges of such ioyes & felicities, came all to a Castle comedowne, her hopes being confounded, her purposes disappointed, and she now brought to desolation: who semed neither to haue the fauour of God, nor the harts of her subiectes, nor yet the loue of her husband: MarginaliaThe ill lucke of Q. Mary with her husband.who neither had fruite by him while she had him, neither could now enioy him whō she had maryed, neither yet was in liberty to mary any other whom she might enioy. Marke here (Christian Reader) the wofull aduersity of this Queene, and learne withall, what the Lord can do when mans wilfulnes will needes resist him, and will not be ruled.

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MarginaliaThe finall ende and death of Q. Mary.At last, when all these fayre admonitions would take no place with the Queene, nor moue her to reuoke her bloudy lawes, nor to stay the tyranny of her Priestes, nor yet to spare her owne Subiectes, but that the poore seruauntes of God were drawne dayly by heapes most pitifully as sheepe to the slaughter, it so pleased the heauenly Maiesty of almighty God, when no other remedy would serue, by death to cut her of, which in her life so litle regarded the life of others: geuing her throne, which she abused to the destruction of Christes Church and people, to an other who more tēperatly and quietly could guid the same, after she had reigned here the space of fiue yeares and fiue monethes. MarginaliaQ. Mary raygned 5. yeares & 5. monethes. The shortnes of Queene Maryes raigne noted.The shortnes of which yeares and reigne, vnneth we finde in any other story of King or Queene since the Conquest or before (being come to theyr owne gouernment) saue onely in king Richard the thyrd.

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MarginaliaAn admonition to all Christian rulers.And thus much here, as in the closing vp of this story, I thought to insinuate, touching the vnlucky and ruefull reign of queene Mary: not for any detraction to her place and state royall, wherunto she was called of the Lord, but to this only intēt and effect, that forsomuch as she would needes set her selfe so confidently to woorke and striue agaynst the Lord and his proceedings, all readers & rulers not only may see how þe Lord did work agaynst her therfore, but also by her may be aduertised & learn what a perillous thing it is for men and women in authority, vpon blind zeale & opinion, to styrre vp persecution in Christes Church, to the effusion of Christian bloud, least it proue in the end with them (as it did here) that while they think to persecute hereticks, they stumble at the same stone as dyd the Iewes in persecuting Christ and his true members to death, to theyr owne confusion and destruction.

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The seuere punishment of God vpon the persecutours of his people and enemyes to his word, with such also as haue bene blasphemers, contemners, and mockers of his Religion. 
Commentary  *  Close

An early version of this section appeared in the 1563 edition; it was more fully developed in the 1570 edition. A few anecdotes were added in the 1576 edition, and additional material was added which was sent to Foxe by John Louth, the archdeacon of Nottingham. This material was supplied to Foxe by individual informants, often acting from self-interested motives of their own.

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MarginaliaA treatise of Gods seuere punishment a- agaynst cruell persecutors, and enemyes to his worde.LEauing now Queene Mary, being dead and gone, I come to them whiche vnder her were the chiefe Ministers and doers in this persecution, the Byshops (I meane) and Priestes of the Clergy, to whō Queene Mary gaue all the execution of her power, 

Commentary  *  Close

Note that while Foxe blames Mary for her adherance to catholicism and her general policies, he blames the persecution on the clergy.

as did Queene Alexandra to the Phariseis after the tyme of the Machabees. Of whom MarginaliaIosephus De antiquit.. lib. 13.Iosephus thus writeth: Ipsa solum nomen regium ferebat, cæterum omnem regni potestatem Pharisæi possidebant. 
Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Josephus
Foxe text Latin

Ipsa solum nomen regium ferebat, caeterum omnem regni potestatem Pharisaei possidebant.

Foxe text translation

She onely reteined to her selfe the name and title of the kyngdome, but all her power she gaue to the Phariseis to possess &c.

Actual text of Josephus, De antiquit. 13.16. 2 (= XIII. 409).

τὸ μὲν οὖν ὄνομα τῆς βασιλείας εἶχεν αὐτη, τὴν δὲ δύναμιν οἱ Φαρισαῖοι·

[Theαὐτη was Queen Alexandra, widow of Alexander Jannaeus, a Jewish king, who had just died in 79 BC]

That is: She onely reteyned to her selfe the name and title of the kingdome, but all her power, she gaue to the phariseis to possesse. &c. Touching which Prelates and Priestes, here is to be noted in lyke sorte the wonderfull and miraculous prouidence of almighty GOD, which as he abridged the reigne of theyr Queene, so he suffered them not to escape vnuisited: first beginning with Stephen Gardiner the Archpersecutour of Christes Church, whom he tooke away about the middest of the Queenes reigne. Of whose poysoned lyfe and stincking end, forsomuche as sufficient hath bene touched before, pag. 1786. MarginaliaThe death of Stephen Gardiner read before pag 1786. I shall not need here to make any newe rehearsall therof.

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After him dropped other awaye also, some before the

death of Queene Mary, and some after, as MarginaliaGods punishment vpon Doct. Morgan Byshop of S. Dauies.Morgan Byshop of S. Dauids, who sitting vppon the condemnation of the blessed Martyr bysh. Farrar, and vniustly vsurping his rowm, not long after was stricken by Gods hand after such a strange sort, that his meate would not go down but rise & pycke vp agayne, somtyme at his mouth, sometyme blowne out of his nose most horrible to beholde, & so he continued till his death. Where note moreouer þt when Mayster Leyson 

Commentary  *  Close

The conclusion of this story may be fanciful, but Griffith Leyson's seizure of Ferrar's cattle actually occurred (see Andrew J. Brown, Robert Ferrar [London: 1997], pp. 346-47).

being then Sheriffe at Byshop Farrars burning, had fet away the cattell of the sayde Byshoppe, from his seruauntes house called Matthewe Harbottell, into his owne custody, the cattell comming into the Sheriffes ground, diuers of them would neuer eate meate but lay bellowing and roaring, and so dyed. 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 629, line 13

The first Edition, p. 1704, proceeds:- "But especiallye is to be noted the terrible stroke of God's hand upon a priest of the same country in Carmerthen, called Sir Richarde, sometyme a Frier. Who, a litle after the martirdome of the said bishop Ferrar, standynge uppon the toppe of a stayre in one master Downes house, dwelling in the said towne of Carmerthen, jestinge at the deathe of maister Ferrar, fel downe soddainly and brake his necke."

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MarginaliaA note of wrong gotten goodes.

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This foresayd Byshoppe Morgan aboue mentioned, bringeth me also in remembraunce of MarginaliaIustice Morgan stricken with madnes.Iustice Morgan, who sate vpon the death of Lady Iane, & not long after the same, fell mad and was bereft of his wittes, & so died, hauing euer in his mouth, Lady Iane, Lady Iane. &c.

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MarginaliaD. Dunning a cruell Chauncellour, stricken with sodaine death.Before the death of Queene Mary, dyed Doct. Dunning the bloudy and wretched Chauncellour of Norwich who, after he had most rigorously condēned and murthered so many simple and faythfull Sayntes of the Lord, cōtinued not longe himselfe, but in the middest of his rage in Queene Maryes dayes dyed in Lincolnshyre being sodaynly taken (as some say) sitting in his chayre.

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MarginaliaThe sodayne death of Berrey a Cōmissary in Northfolke.The like sodayne death fel also vpon Berry Commissary in Northfolke, who (as is before shewed in the story of Thomas Hudson) foure dayes after Queene Maryes death, when he had made a great feast, and had one of hys concubines there, comming home from the Church after Euensong, where he hadde ministred Baptisme the same tyme, betweene the Churchyard and his house, sodeinly fell downe to the ground with a heauy grone, and neuer styrred after, neither shewed any one token of repentance.

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MarginaliaGods stroke vpon D. Thornton Byshop or Suffragan of Douer.What a stroke of Gods hand was brought vppon the cruell persecutour of the holy and harmeles sayntes of the Lord, Byshop Thornton,  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 629, fn 1

"Thorneden or Thornton (for he is writ both ways)," etc. Strype's Memorials under Queen Mary, chap. xv. - ED.

Suffragan of Douer, who after he had exercised hys cruell tyranny vpon so many Godly men at Canterbury, at length comming vppon a Saterday from the Chapter house at Caunterbury to Borne, & there vpon sonday following, looking vpon his mē playing at the bowles, fell sodēly in a Palsey, and so had to bed was willed to remember God, Yea, so I doe (sayd he) and my Lord Cardinall to. &c.

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MarginaliaAn other Suffragan of Douer brake his necke after he had receaued the Cardinalls blessing.After hym succeeded an othher Byshop or Suffragan ordayned by the foresayd Cardinall. It is reported that he had bene Suffragan before to Boner, who not long after was made Bysh. or Suffragan of Douer, brake his necke fallyng downe a payre of stayres in the Cardinals chāber at Grenewich, as he had receiued the Cardinals blessing.

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Among other plentifull and sundrye examples of the Lordes iudgement and seueritie practised vpon the cruell persecutors of hys people, that is not the least that followeth, concerning the story of one William Fenning, 

Commentary  *  Close

This account, and the background to it, are described in Thomas S. Freeman, 'Fate, Faction and Fiction in Foxe's "Book of Martyrs"', Historical Journal 43 (2000), pp. 601-23. Note that there are additions to this account in every edition, arising from the conflicts that this account generated.

þe effect and circumstance of which matter is this.

Iohn Cooper, of the age of 44. yeares, dwelling at Watsam in the County of Suffolke, beyng by science a Carpenter, a man of very honest report & a good housekeeper, a harbourer of straungers, that trauayled for conscience, and one that fauoured Religion, and those that were religious, he was of honest conuersation and good lyfe hating all popish and papisticall trash.

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This man being at home in his house, there came vnto hym one William Fenning, a seruing man dwellyng in the sayd Town of Watsam, and vnderstanding that the sayd Cooper had a couple of fayre Bullockes, did desire to buy them of hym, whiche Cooper told hym that hee was loth to sell them, for that hee had brought them vp for hys owne vse, and if he shoulde sell them, he then must be compelled to buy other and that he would not do.

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When Fenning saw he could not get them (for he had often assayed the matter) he sayd he woulde sit as much in his light, and so departed, and wēt and accused him of high treason. The words he was charged with wer these: how he should pray that if God would not take away Queene Mary, that then he should wishe the Deuill to take her away. Of these wordes did this Fenning charge him before sir Henry Doiell knight (vnto whome he was caryed by M. Timperley of Hinchlesā in Suffolke, & one Grimwood of Lowshaw Cōstable) which wordes Cooper flatly denyed: & sayd he neuer spake them, but that coulde not helpe.

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Notwithstanding he was arrayned therfore at Berry before sir Clement Higham, at a Lent assise, and there this Fenning brought two noughty menne that witnessed the speaking of the foresayd wordes, whose names were Richard White of Watsam, and Grimwood of Higham,

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