Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Adam Damplip [or Damlip]

(d. 1539)

Martyr. Minister. Chaplain to Fisher; on his arrest he fled to Pole in Rome, where he converted to protestantism. [Fines]

At Damlip's execution Sir Ralph Ellerker ordered Damlip's heart to be cut out. 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

[Alias George Bucker.]

 
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Alice Alexander

In a letter Bartlett Green stated that Alice Alexander may be innocent and so prove honest. 1563, p. 1466, 1570, p. 2028, 1576, p. 1747, 1583, p. 1856.

 
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Bayfield

Martyr.

Bayfield did not appear to suffer when burned. 1563, p. 1729, 1570, p. 2259, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

 
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Clarke

Clarke was a catholic who hanged himself in the Tower of London. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2103.

 
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Cox

An apostate.

Cox was a protestant under Edward but converted under Mary. 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

William Living was visited by Cox the promoter in the company of John Launce of the Greyhound Inn. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

Cox died suddenly in his bed. 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

[Not to be confused with Richard Cox, the bishop of Ely.]

 
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George Bradway

Persecutor in Calais.

George Bradway went mad around the time of the death of Mary. 1563, p. 1736, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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George Cotes

Bishop of Chester (1554 - 1555) (DNB)

George Cotes was presented to the bishopric, January 1554 (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p 1396; and 1583, p. 1467).

He re-established catholic services and ceremonies. 1570, pp. 1735-36; 1576, p. 1470 [recte 1482]; 1583, p. 1565.

He imprisoned George Marsh in the episcopal palace. 1563, p. 1119; 1570, pp. 1731 and 1735-36; 1576, pp. 1478 and 1470 [recte 1482]; 1583, pp. 1561 and 1565.

He examined Marsh several times and worked earnestly, through both coercion and persuasion, to force him to recant. 1563, pp. 1119-20; 1570, pp. 1736-37; 1576, pp. 1470 [recte 1482]-77 [recte 1483]; 1583, pp. 1565-66.

Cotes condemned Marsh but he delayed reading the sentence in order to give him a last chance to recant. When Marsh refused, Cotes read the sentence and said that he would no longer pray for him. 1563, pp. 1120-21; 1570, pp. 1737-38; 1576, p. 1477 [recte 1483], 1583, p. 1566.

After Marsh's execution, Cotes preached a sermon denouncing Marsh as a heretic. He was subsequently stricken with a fatal venereal disease as divine retribution. 1563, p. 1122; 1570, p. 1738; 1576, p. 1484; 1583, p. 1567.

George Cotes died before Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

[Foxe calls him 'Coates' and calls the diocese of Chester, 'Westchester'.]

 
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George Day

(1501? - 1556)

Bishop of Chichester (1543 - 1551, 1553 - 1556) [DNB]

George Day was delivered from the Fleet 4 August 1553; he preached at Edward VI's funeral, 8 August 1553 (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1456).

He preached at Mary's coronation, 1 October 1553 (1570; p. 1635, 1576; p. 1395; 1583; p. 1466).

He was one of the commissioners who presided over the deprivation of John Hooper. 1563, pp. 1054-55; 1570, pp. 1678-79; 1576, pp. 1432-33; 1583, p. 1506.

Hooper wrote a letter to Day which Foxe mentions, but did not print. 1563, p. 1063; 1570, p. 1686; 1576, p. 1439; 1583, p. 1512.

Day sought to persuade Sir James Hales to submit to Gardiner and abjure his actions, if not his religious convictions. 1563, p. 1116; 1570, p. 1719; 1576, p.1458; 1583, p. 1532.

On 23 February 1555 the archbishop of York (Nicholas Heath) and the bishop of Chichester (George Day) went to the Counter to speak with John Bradford. They talked for three hours. 1563, pp. 1204-08, 1570, pp. 1794-97, 1576, pp. 1532-34, 1583, pp. 1615-17.

John Bradford was asked by Heath and Day to read a book that had done Dr Crome good. 1563, p. 1208, 1570, p. 1797, 1576, 1524, 1583, p. 1617.

Day visited Gardiner in prison. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

During Philpot's twelfth examination, Worcester told Philpot that Durham and Chichester would be coming to speak with him. 1563, pp. 1434-37, 1570, pp. 1992-96, 1576, pp. 1715-17, 1583, pp. 1822-24.

Philpot's thirteenth examination was before York, Chichester and others. 1570, p. 1996, 1576, pp. 1717-19, 1583, p. 1824-26.

The last examination of Philpot was on 16 December 1555 before Bonner and other bishops, including York, Chichester, Bath, John Harpsfield, Chadsey, Bonner, into which entered William Garret, knight, the lord mayor and the sheriff (Thomas Leigh) of London, Sir Martin Bowes, knight,. 1563, p. 1441, 1570, pp. 1997-98, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1827.

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George Day died before Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

[No relation to John Day the printer or Richard Day the martyr.]

 
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Henry Pendleton

(d. 1557)

Chaplain to Bishop Bonner. Catholic controversialist [DNB]

In Edward VI's reign, Henry Pendleton boasted of the constancy of his protestant convictions to Laurence Saunders, but re-converted to catholicism in Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1049; 1570, p. 1670; 1576, p. 1426; 1583, pp. 1499-1500.

He witnessed Bishop Bonner burning Thomas Tomkins' hand with a candle. 1570, p. 1710; 1576, p. 1460; 1583, p. 1534.

In Bradford's final examination, the bishop of London refers to Bradford's letter to M Pendleton as proof of Bradford's heresy. 1563, p. 1197, 1570, p. 1788, 1576, p. 1527, 1583, p. 1610.

On 28 March 1555 Dr Pendleton, Master Colier and Stephen Beche visited Bradford in the Counter. 1563, p. 1213, 1570, p. 1802, 1576, p. 1537, 1583, p. 1620.

Bradford questioned Pendleton about why Pendleton changed his religion. 1563, pp. 1213-14, 1570, p. 1800, 1576, p. 1537, 1583, p. 1620.

Bradford told Pendleton that he would receive the same answer as Weston had received: that Bradford would not change his position on transubstantiation. 1563, p. 1214, 1570, p. 1804, 1576, p. 1540, 1583, p. 1623.

Foxe states that he omitted the talk between Bradford and Pendleton about 'my lord of Canterbury, of Peter Martirs boke, of Pendleto[n]s letter laid to Bradford.' 1563, p. 1214, 1570, p. 1804, 1576, p. 1540, 1583, p. 1623.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

Pendleton, with Bonner and Feckenham among others, examined Bartlet Green. 1563, pp. 1463-64, 1570, pp. 2025-26,, 1576, p. 1746, 1583, p. 1854.

Dr Pendleton took part in the examination of William Tyms, Robert Drakes, Thomas Spurge, Richard Spurge, John Cavel and George Ambrose. 1570, pp. 2076-77, 1576, p. 1791, 1583, pp. 1896-97.

Henry Pendleton repented at his death. 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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James Abbes

(d. 1555)

Of Stoke Nayland, Suffolk. Martyr.

James Abbes was itinerant because of his religious beliefs. He was caught and appeared before Dr Hopton. He recanted but when the bishop gave him 40 or 20 pence [Foxe is not sure] he withdrew his recantation. He was burned in Bury on 2 August 1555. 1563, p. 1244, 1570, pp. 1864-65, 1576, p. 1594, 1583, p. 1683.

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Abbes took off his shirt to give as alms on his way to the stake. 1563, p. 1705, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1990. 1583, p. 2101.

The sheriff railed against him but then said that Abbes was in fact saved but that he himself was damned. He went about the streets of Bury St Edmunds declaring this to be the case. 1563, p. 1705, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1990. 1583, p. 2101.

Abbes was put in a dark house and then tied to a cart to be returned to his master. A priest came to him with a crucifix and troubled him further. He was burned a short time afterwards. 1563, p. 1705, 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1990. 1583, p. 2101.

 
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James Alexander

Son of the keeper of Newgate Prison.

James Alexander spent his father's estate in less than three years. 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

He died suddenly in Newgate Market. 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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James Baynam

Martyr.

Baynam did not appear to suffer when burned. 1563, p. 1729, 1570, p. 2259, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

 
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James Brookes

(1512 - 1560).

DD (1546). Master of Balliol (1547). Vice chancellor of Oxford (1552). Bishop of Gloucester (1554 - 1559). Deprived of his see upon the accession of Elizabeth. Committed to prison where he died. (DNB)

James Brookes was made bishop of Gloucester, c. January 1554, (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

He was deprived under Elizabeth.

James Brookes was one of those holding a commission from Cardinal Pole to disinter Peter Martyr's wife and burn her bones. 1563, p. 1558, 1570, p. 2152, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

The examinations of John Hunt and Richard White before the bishops of Salisbury and Gloucester (Brookes and Capon), Dr. Geffre (chancellor) took place on 26 April 1557. 1570, p. 2254, 1576, p. 1947, 1583, p. 2054.

Foxe says that James Brookes died before Queen Mary, but he did not die until 1560. 1563, p. 1736, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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James Hales

(d. 1554)

Judge of the Common Pleas (1547 - 1553). Of Canterbury. [DNB] Father-in-law of Joyce Hales.

Sir James Hales is mentioned as opposing the act proclaiming Lady Jane Grey as heir to Edward VI and is characterised as both 'favouringe true religion' and 'as upright a Iudge as any was in this realme' (1563, p. 901; 1570, p. 1567; 1576, p. 1336; and 1583, p. 1406).

Hales' exemplary character and piety are described (1563, pp. 1113-14).

Foxe gives a brief account of how Hales upheld the statutes passed in Edward's reign against the establishing of altars and the mass, was imprisoned and attempted suicide (1563, p. 905; 1570, p. 1571; 1576, pp. 1339-40; and 1583, p. 1410; also see 1563, p. 1114).

After Hales had enforced the Edwardian statues in Kent in the summer of 1553, he came to Westminster at the beginning of the legal term in October 1553 to be sworn in as a justice. Lord Chancellor Stephen Gardiner refused to administer the oath to him unless he abjured. Hales refused. He was arrested soon after. While imprisoned, George Day, William Portman and one Foster sought to persuade him to recant. 1563, pp. 1114-15; 1570, pp. 1708-9; 1576, p. 1458; 1583, p. 1532.

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Sir James Hales received a letter from John Bradford when he was a prisoner in the Counter in Bread Street. 1570, pp. 1818-19, 1576, pp. 1554-56, 1584, p. 1636.

A notice that Hales was committed to the Marshalsea appears in 1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

Hales attempted to commit suicide in prison. Afterward, in April 1554, he was released 1563, p. 1115; 1570, p. 1709; 1576, p. 1459; 1583, p. 1533.

Ridley reported, in a letter to Cranmer, written in the aftermath of the Oxford disputations in April 1554, that John Moreman had persuaded Sir James Hales to recant (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1464).

Hales succeeded in killing himself 1563, p. 1115; 1570, p. 1709; 1576, p. 1459; 1583, p. 1533.

Foxe defends Hales' character and suicide 1563, pp. 1116-17; 1570, p. 1709; 1576, p. 1459; 1583, p. 1533.

Hales drowned himself. 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1991. 1583, p. 2101.

 
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Jeffrey Hurst

Nail maker. Of Shakerley, Lancashire.

Jeffrey Hurst was the son of a yeoman and married the sister of George Marsh. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

He fled to Yorkshire for fear of persecution, leaving his wife and child. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 1076.

He secretly returned home at night when possible. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

Hurst would secretly take communion with Reneses, Best, Brodbanke and Russel, who were all preachers. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

He returned home after the death of his father for around seven or eight weeks. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

The house was searched under the direction of Thomas Lelond, justice, and Hurst's books were found, including Tindal's translation of the New Testament. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

He was examined by Lelond. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

Hurst fell ill after performing the duty of ensuring that Queen Elizabeth's proceedings took place, and died. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

[Brother-in-law of George Marsh.]

[See Christopher Haigh, Reformation and Resistance in Tudor Lancashire (Cambridge, 1975), pp. 85, 172, 173, 187, 188, 192.]

 
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John Avales

Described by Foxe as one of Queen Mary's servants. Probably a constable. Of Southwark.

John Lithal was brought for examination by John Avales. 1570, p. 2266, 1576, p. 1957, 1583, p. 2063.

Dabney was brought for examination before Bonner by John Avales. 1563, p. 1696, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

Unable to find Dabney, Avales demanded 15 crowns from his wife and eventually left them alone. 1563, p. 1697, 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Avales searched for a congregation in London and came close to spotting them. 1570, p. 2278, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2074.

He talked with two men in Pudding Lane but was unable to locate the underground congregation in the area. 1570, p. 2278, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2074.

Richard Waterson was apprehended by Roin Caly, John Hill and John Avales and sent before Bonner. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

 
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John Dale

(fl. 1539 - 1559)

Fellow of Queen's College (1542 - 1548). Chaplain and cross bearer to Cambridge University (1554). Rector of Little Shelford, Cambridgeshire, and of Wetheringsett, Suffolk (both in 1557). Did not subscribe to the oath of allegiance and was a recusant after 1558. (Venn)

A discussion of scripture and civil law was planned between Bonner and Dr Dale to be had with Bartlett Green. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

Dale was present at Philpot's presentment before Bonner on 17 November 1555. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

John Dale misunderstood Nicholas Ormanet's request for the pixe and brought him instead a chalice and the host. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570]

John Dale was called a blockhead by Ormaneto for mistakenly bringing him a chalice and host instead of the pix he requested. 1563, p. 1544, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1960.

Dale was told by Ormaneto to treat the host reverently. 1563, p. 1544, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1960.

His body was infested with lice at his death. John Avales provided testimony of this. 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

[Not related to John Dale of Hadleigh.]

 
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John Fisher

(1459 - 1535)

Vice-chancellor of Cambridge University (1501 - 1504). Chancellor of Cambridge University (1504). Bishop of Rochester (1504 - 1535). (DNB)

Equivalences are drawn between the deaths of Northumberland and Thomas More, and of Fisher and Cranmer. 1563, p. 1499, 1570, p. 2064, 1576, p. 1781, 1583, p. 1885.

John Fisher was executed on Tower Hill for rejecting the royal supremacy. 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1991. 1583, p. 2101.

 
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John Frith

(1503 - 1533)

Theologian and early martyr [DNB; H. Hillerbrand (ed.), The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation, 1996]

Foxe refers to Frith's early career and doctrine. 1583, p. 2126.

Frith's confutation of the writings of Sir Thomas More caused many to seek his destruction. 1583, p. 2126.

Henry VIII directed Cranmer and Cromwell (and others, including Stokesly) to examine Frith. 1583, pp. 2126-27.

Hubberdin railed against Latimer, and also railed against Luther, Melancthon, Zwingli, Frith, and Tyndale. Hubberdin danced in the pulpit. 1570, p. 1912, 1576, p. 1639, 1583, p. 1748.

 
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John Holyman

(1495 - 1558)

BD (1526). Bishop of Bristol (1553 - 1558). Formerly a monk of Reading. (Fasti; DNB)

Foxe mentions John Holyman's receipt of the bishopric of Bristol in January 1554 (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583 p. 1467).

An examination of Ridley and Latimer was conducted by White (Lincoln), Brookes (Gloucester) and Holyman (Bristol) on 30 September 1555. White, Brookes and Holyman received their commission from Cardinal Pole. 1563, pp. 1297-98, 1570, pp. 1903-09, 1576, pp. 1631-39, 1583, pp. 1757-60.

John Holyman died before Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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John Peter

Son-in-law to Alexander, keeper of Newgate.

John Peter said on many occasions that if things were not true God should let him rot. He died of a disease that caused his body to rot. John Day the printer was witness to this. 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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John Rockwood

John Rockwood died horribly, uttering the words 'All too late,' which were the same words he had uttered when persecuting people in Calais during Henry VIII's reign.

 
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Lady Honor Lisle

Wife of Arthur Lord Lisle (d. 1542), Henry VIII's governor of Calais (DNB)

Lady Honor Lisle lost her sanity around the time of the death of Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

[There is a good account of Lady Lisle in J. A. Rowley-Williams, 'Image and Reality: The Lives of Aristocratic Women in Early Tudor England (unpublished PhD thesis, University of Wales, 1998).]

 
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Pavier or Pavie

(d. 1533); town clerk of the city of London

Edward Hall reported that Pavier had said that if the king sanctioned an English edition of the scriptures and allowed people to read it, he (Pavier) would cut his throat. He was at the burning of James Bainham (Foxe calls him Richard Bainham), calling for the heretic to be burnt. The next year he hanged himself. 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1027; 1583, p. 1055.

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Richard Foxford

LLD (1530). Chancellor of London. (Fasti)

Richard Foxford died suddenly. 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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Robert Baulding

Possibly a constable. Of Mendlesham, Suffolk.

Robert Baulding was struck by lightning at the taking of William Seaman and died of his injuries. 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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Robert Blomfield

Constable of Little Stonham, Suffolk. Bailiff to Sir John Jerningham.

Robert Blomfield met with Edward Golding the under-sheriff to discuss William Brown's sermon. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

Golding and Blomfield examined certain men of the town about Brown's sermon. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

Brown was taken at night and should have been taken before the council the following day, but Blomfield fell sick and could not take him. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

After Brown's death, Blomfield's son became sick, as did his wife who later died. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

Blomfield then remarried a rich widow but he became very sick and died. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

When Blomfield died he was ninescore pounds in debt. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

Shortly before he died Blomfield threatened a man named Simon Harlston. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

 
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Robert King

(d. 1557)

Bishop of Oxford. Second son of William King of Tame. (DNB)

Robert King died before Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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Robert Parfew [or Purfoy]

(d. 1557)

Bishop of St Asaph and then Hereford. (DNB)

Robert Parfew died before Queen Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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Sir Ralph Ellerker

(d. 1550)

High sheriff (1529). Knighted by Henry VIII on presentation of the ensign won in France. (DNB)

Having requested the heart to be cut out of Adam Damlip, Ellerker himself was murdered by the French, who mangled him, cut off his genitalia and then removed his heart. 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1991. 1583, p. 2101.

 
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Sir Thomas More

(1478 - 1535)

Chancellor of England and author. (DNB)

On 14 February 1555 Creswell, an old acqauintance of Bradford's, went to visit Bradford in prison. He offered to make suit for Bradford. He returned later, at 11 o'clock, with another man and gave Bradford a book by Thomas More, desiring him to read it. He told Bradford that the lords of York, Lincoln and Bath wished to speak with him. 1563, p. 1200, 1570, pp. 1790-91, 1576, p. 1529, 1583, pp. 1612-13 .

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The deaths of Northumberland and Thomas More are referred to in the description of the death of Cranmer. 1563, p. 1499, 1570, p. 2064, 1576, p. 1781, 1583, p. 1885.

Sir Thomas More met with a bloody death on Tower Hill. 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

Frith's confutation of the writings of Sir Thomas More caused many to seek Frith's destruction. 1583, p. 2126.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Thomas Smith

(1513 - 1577)

Author of De republica Anglorum (DNB)

Cited to appear before the Queen's Commissioners on 27 August 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

Author of a prayer for the health of Queen Mary and her conceived child printed by Foxe (1563, pp. 1016-17; 1570, p. 1654; 1576, p. 1410; 1583, p. 1481). [NB: Smith is only identified as the author in the 1563 edition].

 
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Thomas Beard

A tailor in Fleet Street, London. Marian informer against protestants. [Bridgen, London and the Reformation, pp. 454, 569, 626.]

Beard visited John Cardmaker in Newgate prison a few days before Cardmaker's execution and tried to persuade him to recant; Cardmaker refused. 1570, p. 1754; 1576, p. 1498; 1583, p. 1581.

Beard discovered John Small reading from an English Bible to a small group in the house of James Trevisam. He denounced the group to the authorities and had them arrest. 1570, p. 1843, 1576, p. 1577, 1583, p. 1665.

George Tankerfield's wife was tricked by Beard. She later attacked him. George Tankerfield was then taken to Newgate by Beard and Simon Ponder. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

Thomas Beard died wretchedly. 1563, p. 1705, 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1990. 1583, p. 2101.

[NB: Beard tried to obtain banned catholic books during Edward VI's reign; see Brigden, London, p. 454].

 
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Thomas Lelond

JP. Of Lancashire. [See Christopher Haigh, Reformation and Resistance in Tudor Lancashire (Cambridge, 1975), pp. 187, 192.]

The Hurst house was searched under the direction of Thomas Lelond, justice, and Hurst's books were found, including Tindal's translation of the New Testament. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

Thomas Lelond spoke with Mrs Hurst during the search of her house for her son's possessions. He called her an old fool and threatened her with prison. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

Lelond had John Hurst bound with his mother in the sum of £100 to betray the whereabouts of his brother Jefrrey and sister Alice. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

Jeffrey Hurst was examined by Lelond. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

Thomas Lelond continued to hold office in Elizabeth's time, when he rarely attended church. He blamed his lack of attendance on the fact that he was old. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

He kept Parkinson near to him and said that he could minister to him outside of church. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

When he did go to church the bells on the collar of his dog made a great din. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

Foxe recounts his habits at church. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

Lelond died suddenly in his chair whilst talking with friends. 1570, p. 2280, 2300 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

 
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William Brown

(d. 1558)

Parson of little Stonham (alias Stanham Jerningham), Suffolk

William Brown made a sermon in his home town after the death of Edward VI. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

Robert Blomfield, the constable of the town and bailiff to Sir John Jerningham, met with Edward Golding the under-sheriff to discuss Brown's sermon. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

Golding and Blomfield examined certain men of the town about Brown's sermon. 1563, p. 1676, 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

The sheriff, Sir Thomas Cornwallis, made a bill against William Brown. 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

Brown was taken at night and should have been taken before the council the following day, but Blomfield fell sick and could not take him. 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

Brown was sent to Bury St Edmunds prison and then to the Fleet. 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

Brown was released and returned to his home town but would not attend mass, so he and his wife had to flee their home town. 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

Brown died in the last year of Mary's reign. 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

 
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William Glynn

(1504? - 1558)

DD (1544). Lady Margaret Professor of Divinity (1544). First master of Trinity College, Cambridge (1546). Vice-chancellor of Cambridge University (1554). President of Queen's (1553 - 1556). Bishop of Bangor (1555 - 1558). (Venn; DNB )

William Glynn was one of the catholic disputants at the Oxford disputations of 1554.

During Ridley's disputation on 17 April 1554, Glynn accused Ridley of ignoring the scriptures and the Fathers. Ridley was wounded by this remark, especially since Glynn had been an old friend. Later, according to Foxe, Glynn visited Ridley where he was being held and begged his forgiveness, which Ridley granted (1563, pp. 936-37 and 971-72; 1570, pp. 1591-92 and 1618; 1576, pp. 1358-59 and 1380-81; 1583, pp. 1428-30 and 1451).

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William Brandor is mentioned (only in 1563) as disputing with Ridley in the Oxford disputations of 1554 (1563, p. 934). This is almost certainly a confused reference to William Glynn, who was made bishop of Bangor in 1555.

He was created bishop of Bangor (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

Philpot appeared before the bishops of London, Worcester and Bangor for his twelfth examination on 4 December 1555. 1563, pp. 1434-37, 1570, pp. 1992-94, 1576, pp. 1715-17, 1583, p. 1822.

William Glyn died before Queen Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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William Peto

(d. 1558)

Cardinal. He was papally provided to the see of Salisbury in 1543, and nominally held it until his death, although everyone in England ignored it, including Mary.(DNB)

William Peto died before Queen Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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William Seaman

(1522? - 1558)

Husbandman. Martyr. Of Mendlesham, Suffolk.

William Seaman was originally searched for by Sir John Tyrrel, who later set Robert Baulding and James Clarke to look for him. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

Baulding was Seaman's near neighbour and trusted friend. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

Baulding was taken ill after a strange light fell upon him and later died. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

After being questioned by Sir John Tyrrel, William Seaman was sent before Bishop Hopton who then condemned him. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

Seaman had three children and a wife, who was persecuted out of the town and all her goods were seized by Christopher Cole. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

William Seaman was burned at Norwich on 19 May 1558. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

 
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Bury St. Edmunds
Berry, Burie, Bury, Burye, S. Edmondsbury, Saint Edmundes Bury, Sainte Edmundes Burye, S. Edmunds Bury, S. Edmundsbury
NGR: TL 853 649

A borough and market town, having exclusive jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Thingoe, county of Suffolk. 26.5 miles north-west by north from Ipswich. The monastery at the dissolution was worth £2336 16s. per annum. Bury comprises the parishes of St. Mary and St. James. The living of each is a donative in the patronage of the mayor and corporation.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2125 [2101]

Queene Mary. Gods punishment vpon persecutors, and contemners of the Gospell.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.with no smal othes, cursing the Crow that had poysoned him. MarginaliaThe stinking death of a Popish Massemonger.To make short, he continued but a fewe daies, but wt extreme paine of vomiting and crying, he desperately died without any token of repentance of his former life.

Reported and testified for a certaintie, by diuers of his neighbours, both honest aud credible persons.

MarginaliaOf the Martyrdome of Iames Abbes, read before, pag. 1683.Of Iames Abbes Martyr, ye heard before. In the time of whose Martyrdom, what befell vppon a wicked railer against him, now ye shall further vnderstand. MarginaliaA story to be noted of all rayling persecutours.Wherby all such railing persecutors may learne to feare Gods hand, and to take heede, howe or what they speake againste his seruaunts. As this Iames Abbes  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 633, line 9 from the bottom

The first Edition, p. 1705, continues:- "At the time of his martirdom, when the sheriffe came to have him awaye, he, to make him selfe the redier to that heavenly journey, did untye his hose, and other his apparell, ere that he went out of the prison, Wherupon as the serife did lead," &c.

was led by the sheriffe toward his execution, diuers poore people stood in þe way, and asked their almes. He then hauing no money to geue them, and desirous yet to distribute some thing amongest them, did pull off all his apparell sauing hys shirt, & gaue the same vnto them, to some one thing, to some an other: in the geuing wherof he exhorted them to be strong in the Lord, and as faithfull followers to Christ, to stand stedfast vnto the truthe of the Gospell, which hee (through Gods helpe) would then in their sight seale and confirme wt hys bloud. Whiles he was thus charitably occupied, and zealously instructing the people, MarginaliaThe Shrieffes seruaunt vyly rayling agaynst Iames Abbes.a seruaunt of the Sheriffes going by & hearing him, cried out aloude vnto them, and blasphemously sayd, beleue him not good people. He is an hereticke and a mad man, out of his wit: beleue him not, for it is heresy that he saith. And as the other continued in his godly admonitions, so did thys wicked wretche still blowe foorthe his blasphemous exclamations vntill they came vnto the stake where he should suffer. Vnto þe which this constant Martyr was tied, & in the ende cruelly burned, as in his storie more fully is already declared.

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MarginaliaA fearefull example of Gods righteous iudgment against the Sheriffes seruaunt rayling agaynst Iames Abbes.But immediatly after the fire was put vnto him (such was the fearfull stroke of Gods iustice vpon this blasphemous railer) that he was there presently in the sight of all the people, stricken with a frenesy, wherewith he had before mooste railingly charged that good Martyr of God, who is this furious rage and madnesse, castinge off hys shoes, with all the rest of his cloathes, cried out vnto the people, and sayde: Thus did Iames Abbes the true seruaunt of God, who is saued, but I am damned. And thus ranne hee rounde about the Towne of Burie, still crying out that Iames Abbes was a good man and saued, but he was damned.

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The Sheriffe then being amazed, and caused him to be taken & tied in a darke house, and by force compelled hym againe to put on his cloathes, thinking thereby wythin a while to bring him to some quietnes. But he (all that notwithstanding) as soone as they were gone, continued his former raging: and casting of his cloathes, cried as he did before: Iames Abbes is the seruant of God and is saued, but I am damned.

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MarginaliaExample how Popery bringeth to desperation.At length he was tied in a carte, & brought home vnto his Maisters house, and wythin halfe a yeare or thereaboutes, he being at the poynt of death, the priest of the parish was sent for: who comming vnto him, brought wyth him the Crucifixe, and theyr houseling host of the aultare. Which geare when the poore wretch sawe, he cried oute of the Priest, and defied all that baggage, saying þt the Priest wyth suche other as he was, was the cause of his damnation, and that Iames Abbes was a good man, and saued. And so shortly after he died.

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MarginaliaClarke hanged himselfe.Clarke an open enemie to the Gospell and all Godly preachers, in king Edwards daies hanged him self in the Tower of London.

MarginaliaThe sodaine death of Troling Smith.The great and notable papist called Troling Smith, of late fell downe sodenly in the streete and died.

MarginaliaDale the promotor eaten with lyce.Dale the Promoter was eaten into his body wt Lice, and so died, as it is well knowen of manye, and confessed also by his fellow Iohn Auales, before credible witnesse.

MarginaliaCoxe the Promotor sodainely dyed.Coxe an earnest protestant in king Edwardes dayes, and in Quene Maries tyme a papist and a Promoter, going wel and in health to bed (as it seemed) was deade before the morning. Testified by diuers of the neighbours.

MarginaliaAlexander the cruell keeper of Newgate, dyed a rotten death.Alexander the Keeper of Newgte, a cruell enemie to those that lay there for Religion, died very miserably, being so swollen þt he was more like a monster then a man, and so rotten within, that no man could abide the smell of him. This cruell wretch, to hasten the poore lambes to the slaughter, would go to Boner, Story, Cholmley, & other, crying out: rid my prison, rid my prison: I am too muche pestered with these heretickes.

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MarginaliaThe sodaine death of Iames Alexanders sonne.The sonne of þe saide Alexander called Iames, hauing left vnto him by his father great substaunce, within three yeres wasted al to nought: And whē some marueled how he spent those goodes so fast: O sayde he, euill gotten, euill spent: and shortly after as hee went in Newgate market,

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fell downe sodenly, and there wretchedly died.

MarginaliaIohn Peter Alexanders sonne in lawe, rotted away.Iohn Peter, sonne in lawe to this Alexander, an horrible blasphemer of God, & no lesse cruell to the said prisoners, rotted away, and so most miserably died. Who commonly when he woulde affirme any thing, were it true or false, vsed to say: If it be not true, I pray God I rotte ere I die. Witnesse the Printer heereof, with diuers other.

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MarginaliaIustice Lelond persecutour plagued.With these I mighte inferre the sodeine death of Iustice Lelond persecutor of Ieffray Hurst, mentioned before, pag. 2076.

MarginaliaRobert Baulding persecutor.Also the death of Robert Baulding stricken wt Lightning at the taking of William Seamen, whereuppon hee pined away and died: the storie of the which W. Seaman, see pag. 2035.

MarginaliaBeard the Promotor.Likewise the wretched end of Beard the promoter.

MarginaliaRobert Blomfield persecutor.Moreouer, the consuming away of Rob. Blomfielde, persecutor of William Browne, specified pag. 2065.

MarginaliaThe iudgement of God vpon Iohn Rockwood Lady Honor, and George Bradway persecutors in Calice. MarginaliaRichard Long drowned himselfe.Further, to returne a little backewarde to king Henries time, here might be induced also the example of Ihon Rockewoode, who in his horrible ende, cried all to late, wt the same woordes whiche he had vsed before in persecuting Gods poore people of Calice, pag. 1055.

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Also the iudgement of God vpon Lady Honor a persecutor, and of George Bradway a false accuser, both bereft of theyr wittes, page. 1227.

MarginaliaThe iust punishmēt of God vpō Syr Rafe Ellerker persecutor.And what a notable spectacle of Gods reuengyng iudgement, haue wee to consider in Syr Rafe Ellerker, who as hee was desirous to see the heart taken out of Adam Damlyp, whom they most wrongfully put to death: so shortly after the sayd Syr Rafe Ellerker being slaine of the Frenchmen, they all too mangling him, after they had cutte off hys priuie members, woulde not so leaue hym, before they myght see hys heart cutte oute of hys bodye, pag. 1229.

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MarginaliaThe sodaine death of D. Foxford.Doctor Foxforde, Chauncellor to bishop Stokesley, a cruell persecutor, died sodeinly, read pag. 1055.

MarginaliaPauier a persecutor hanged himselfe.Pauier or Pauie, Towne Clearke of London, and a bitter enemie to the Gospell, hanged him selfe, pag. 1055.

Steuen Gardiner hearing of the pitiful end of Iudge Hales after he had drowned himself, taking occasiō thereby, called the following aud professiō of the Gospel a doctrine of desperation. But as Iudge Hales neuer fell into that inconuenience before hee had consented to Papistrye: so who so well considereth the ende of Doctour Pendleton (which at hys death ful sore repented that euer he had yeelded to the doctrine of the Papists, as he did) 

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There was considerable dispute as to whether Henry Pendleton renounced catholicism on his deathbed or not (see Emden).

and likewise the miserable ende of the moste parte of the Papistes besides, and especially of Steuen Gardiner him selfe, who after so longe professinge the doctrine of Papistrie, when there came a Bishop to him in his deathbed, and put him in remembraunce of Peter denying his Maister, he aunswearing againe, sayd: that he had denied with Peter, but neuer repented with Peter, and so both stinckingly & vnrepentantly died: will say, as Steuen Gardiner also hym selfe gaue an euident exāple of the same, to all men to vnderstand that Poperie rather is a doctrine of desperation, MarginaliaThe stinking end of Stephen Gardiner proueth Popery and not the Gospell to be the doctrine of desperaration. procuring the vengeaunce of almighty God to them that wilfully do cleaue vnto it.

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MarginaliaGods iust stroke vpon Iohn Fisher B. of Rochester, and Syr Thomas More.Iohn Fisher Bishop of Rochester, and Syr Thomas More, in Kyng Henryes time, after they hadde brought Iohn Frith, Baifield and Baynham, and diuers other to theyr death, what great reward wanne they therby with almighty God? Did not the sworde of Gods vengeaunce light vpon their owne neckes shortly after, and they them selues made a publicke spectable at the tower hil, of bloudy deathe, which before had no compassion of the liues of others? Thus ye see the saying of the Lord to be true: Marginalia2. Mach. 3.Hee that smiteth with the sword, shall pearish with the sword.

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So was Heliodorus in the old time of the Iewes plagued by Gods hand in the Temple of Hierusalem.

So did Antiochus, Herode, Iulian, MarginaliaOf Valerianus read before pag. 74.Valerianus the Emperour, Decius, Maxentius, with infinite others, after they had exercised theyr crueltye vppon Gods people, feele the like striking hand of God them selues also, in reuenging the bloud of his seruaunts.

And thus much concerning those persecutors, as well of the Clergy sort, as of the laity, which were stricken, and died before the death of Quene Mary. With whom also is to be numbered in the same race of persecuting Byshops, which died before Quene Mary, these bishops folowing. MarginaliaBishops that dyed before Q. Mary.

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Bishops.
 
 
 
Coates Bishop of Westchester.
Parfew Bishop of Harford.
Glinne Bishop of Bangor.
Brookes Bishop of Glocester.
King Bishop of Tame.
Peto Elect of Salisburie.
Day Bishop of Chichester.
Holyman Bishop of Bristow

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