Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Anthony Draycot

(d. 1571)

Chancellor of Lincoln under Longland; chancellor of Coventry under Bayne. [DNB DCL, 1552; Foster]

John Glover was buried in the Churchyard but Chancellor Draycot demanded that he be dug up. The priest protested, as Glover had been buried for six weeks and therefore stank, so Draycot insisted that Glover be denounced as damned from the pulpit and then dug up after one year and his bones be thrown over the wall into the highway. This information was given by the parson of the town to Hugh Burrows of Fynden in Derbyshire and to Glover's wife, Agnes, who gave the information to Foxe. 1570, p. 1892, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

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Chancellour Draycot examined Thomas Barnes and Elice Byrch on 27 June 1556 regarding their conversation about the proclamation of two queens in England after the death of Edward VI. One of them was condemned to bear a fagot for speaking against the mass. 1563, p. 1527.

Draycot persecuted Joan Waste of Derby. 1563, p. 1545, 1570, p. 2137, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1951.

Anthony Draycot had Waste apprehended in Derby. 1570, p. 2137, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1952.

Joan Waste was condemned by Anthony Draycot and Ralph Bayne. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

On the day of her death Joan Waste was accompanied to church by Draycot, Thomas Powthread, Henry Vernon, Master Dethick of Newhall and many others. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

Draycot preached a violent sermon against Joan Waste. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

Draycot demanded that the gentlemen and bailiffs witness Joan Waste's death. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

Draycot went to an inn and slept during Joan Waste's execution. 1570, p. 2138, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1952.

Draycot is described by Foxe as being even more cruel that Ralph Bayne. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Draycot and Bayne examined the following (but later dismissed them): John Adale, Anthony Afterwhittle, Thomas Arch, Thomas Arnal, John Avines, Henry Birdlim, Eustache Bysacre, Julius Dudley, William Enderby, Richard Foxal, John Frankling, Anthony Jones, Richard Kempe, John Leach, Hugh Lynacres, Thomas Lynacres, William Marler, Hugh Moore, William Mosley, Martin Newman, Isabel Parker, Cicely Preston, John Richardson, John Robinson, Thomas Sailter, William Shene, John Stamford, Thomas Steilbe, Thomas Underdone, Francis Ward, Richard Weaver, Thomas Wilson, and Richard Woodburne. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

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Robert Aston was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Richard Bayly was examined by Draycot and Bayne and deprived. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

John Borsley the younger was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield on September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Norris was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield on September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Anselm Sele was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Richard Slavy was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Smith was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Stiffe was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

John Waterhouse was examined and forced by Draycot and Bayne to do penance. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

William Taylor and Henry Tecka were deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Agnes Foreman was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield on 12 September 1556. 1563, p. 1547, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1954.

Edward Hawkes was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

William Kaime was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Robert Katrenes was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Joyce Lewes was examined by Draycot and Bayne in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in October 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Robert Mossey was examined and deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

As Joyce Lewes took a drink at her execution, she said that she drank to all those who loved the gospel and desired the abolition of papistry. Several of the town's women drank from the same cup and were examined by the bishop and his chancellor and later forced to do penance. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

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Thomas Parkinson was examined in 1558 by Anthony Draycot and made to do penance. 1563, p. 1681.

Anthony Draycot was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1990. 1583, p. 2101.

 
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Cuthbert Scott

(d. 1569)

Bishop of Chester (1556 - 1559) (DNB); master of Christ's College, Cambridge (1553 - 1556) (Venn)

Cuthbert Scott was appointed to debate with Latimer in the Oxford disputations of 1554 (1563, p. 934).

He was one of the official disputants in the Oxford disputations of 1554 (1563, pp. 936-38; 1570, pp. 1591-92; 1576, pp. 1358-59; 1583, pp. 1428-30).

In an attempt to reinstate catholicism at the University of Cambridge, a commission under the direction of Cardinal Pole ordered the condemning and burning of the bones and books of Phagius and Martin Bucer. Members of the commission were Cuthbert Scott, Nicholas Ormanet, Thomas Watson, John Christopherson and Henry Cole. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570].

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Cuthbert Scott was chosen by Pole to be a persecutor of the University of Cambridge. 1563, p. 1537, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

Scott responded to John Stokes' oration at Cambridge University on 11 January 1557. 1563, p. 1539, 1570, p. 2144, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1958.

Brassey again excused himself at St Mary's church on 12 January 1557. Scott answered his words. 1563, p. 1540, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1958.

Scott, Watson and Christopherson interdicted St Mary's Church, Cambridge, where Bucer was buried.1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 1959.

On 14 January 1557, after the examination of the provost and vice-provost of Cambridge, Thomas Bacon invited Perne, Dr Young, Dr Harvey, Swinborne, and Maptide to come to dinner. He was examined before Scott, Watson and Christopherson on 14 January 1557. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2146, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1960.

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Scott spoke with Nicholas Carre, as a former pupil of Bucer, about the heresies of Bucer. 1563, p. 1540, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1957.

Carre denounced Scott's opinion of Bucer and sent him into a rage, berating Carre for his words at Bucer's burial. Scott desisted when no one presented any evidence against Carre's actions. 1563, p. 1540, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1957.

Scott made an oration at the condemnation of Bucer and Phagius. 1570, p. 2148, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1961.

The condemnation of Bucer was given the bishop of Chester's seal. 1570, p. 2148, 1576, p. 1868, 1583, p. 1961.

John Hullier appeared before Shaxton, Young, Segewick, Scott, Mitch and others on Palm Sunday eve at Great St Mary's. 1570, p. 2196, 1576, p. 1895, 1583, p. 2004.

Dr Dakins was given commission by the bishop of Chester to examine John and Richard Snell. 1570, [unnumbered sheet at beginning of volume 1], 1576, 2008, 1583, p. 2150.

Cuthbert Scott was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

Scott was in the Fleet but escaped to Louvain and died there. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
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Cuthbert Tunstall

(1474 - 1559) (DNB)

Bishop of London (1522 - 1530). Bishop of Durham (1530 - 1551, 1553 - 1559). (DNB)

On 5 August 1553 Cuthbert Tunstall was released from the Tower. Foxe calls him, 'doctor Tonstal' (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1465).

He was present at Gardiner's sermon, 30 September 1554; cited as bishop of Durham (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

He was one of John Rogers's examiners on 22 January 1555 (1563, pp. 1023-26; 1570, 1657-59; 1576, pp. 1414-15; 1583, pp. 1484-86). He examined Rowland Taylor on the same day (1563, pp. 1071-73;1570, pp. 1696-97; 1576, p. 1640; 1583, pp. 1521-22).

He was one of the commissioners who presided over the deprivation of Hooper. 1563, pp. 1054-55; 1570, 1678-79; 1576, pp. 1432-33; 1583, p. 1505.

He was one of the commissioners who condemned John Bradford, Laurence Saunders and Rowland Taylorto death (1570, p. 1699; 1576, p. 1450; 1583, pp. 1523-24).

He was one of the commissioners who interrogated Robert Ferrar on 4 February 1555 (1563, p. 1732; 1570, pp.1722-23; 1576, p. 1471; 1583, pp. 1553-54).

Bradford was brought to speak to Bonner by the under-marshal of the King's Bench. Talk took place between the lord chancellor, Bonner and John Bradford on 22 January 1555, during which the bishop of Durham, Sir Richard Southwell, Sir Robert Rochester, and Secretary Bourne questioned Bradford's eucharistic doctrine. 1563, pp. 1185-88, 1570, pp. 1782-84, 1576, pp. 1522-23, 1583, pp. 1605-06.

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Tunstall was present at the next examination of Bradford that took place after Bradford's imprisonment in the Tower, August 1553-22 January 1555. 1570, p. 1782, 1576, p. 1522, 1583, p. 1605.

During the conversation between Hussey and Bradford, Doctor Seton entered the room and spoke a 'long sermon of my Lord Canterbury, M. Latimer, and M. Ridley'. He acknolwedged that Latimer and Ridley were not able to answer anything at all at their examinations, and that Canterbury desired to confer with Durham and others, saying that Bradford should make a like suit, to which Seton received no agreement from Bradford. Seton berated Bradford for his attitude, and claimed that Bonner could be charitable. 1563, p. 1191, 1570, p. 1786, 1576, p. 1526, 1583, p. 1609.

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The bishop of Durham asked Bradford when the Lord appeared in the giving of the sacrament, to which Bradford replied by quoting Chrysostom. 1563, p. 1198, 1570, p. 1789, 1576, p. 1528, 1583, p. 1611.

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

Robert Farrer was examined before the bishops of Durham and Worcester, Sir Robert Rochester, Sir Richard Southwell and Gilbert Bourne. 1563, p. 1732, 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2136.

Cuthbert Tunstall died after Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

[Also referred to as 'doctor Tonstal']

 
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David Pole

(d. 1568)

DCL (1527 - 1528). Bishop of Peterborough (1557 ' 1559) (DNB)

Foxe states that Pole was made bishop of St Asaph (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467). This is an error; Thomas Goldwell was made bishop of St Asaph. Pole would be made bishop of Peterborough.

Foxe was not sure whether Pole was imprisoned in the Tower or elsewhere after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

[Treated kindly by Elizabeth and allowed to live on in London or the surrounding suburbs. Died on one of his farms. (DNB)]

[Not related to Reginald Pole.]

 
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Edmund Steward

(d. 1559)

BCivL Cambridge (1514), DCivL (1541) Venn. Dean of Winchester (1554 - 1559 dep.) Fasti. Chaplain to Henry VIII.

Steward was one of the witnesses of Henry VIII's bill banning heretical books. 1563, pp. 1342-43.

Steward died after Queen Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
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Edward Fiennes

(1512 - 1585)

Lord Clinton and Saye. Lord High Admiral. (DNB, Cockayne)

Foxe refers to Thomas Cornwallis's repair to London out of Essex with Clinton and others. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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Gilbert Bourne

(d. 1569)

Fellow of All Souls' College, Oxford (1531). Prebend of Worcester (1541). Bishop of Bath and Wells (1554 - 1560) [DNB]

Bourne preached a sermon at Paul's Cross on 13 August 1553, praising Bonner and criticising Edward VI. This so enraged his auditors that a dagger was thrown at him. At the request of Bourne's brother, Bradford quieted the mob; Bradford and John Rogers later escorted Bourne to safety. (Rerum, pp. 464 - 65; 1563, pp. 904 - 5; 1570, p. 1570; 1576, p 1339; and 1583, p. 1497 (recte 1409)).

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Bourne's sermon is briefly mentioned later by Foxe (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1465).

He was created bishop of Bath and Wells (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

He visited Walter Mantell repeatedly before his execution and unsuccessfully attempted to convert him to catholic teachings on confession and the Sacrament (1570, p. 1638; 1576, pp. 1397-98; 1583, p. 1468).

Together with Edmund Bonner and Henry Morgan, Gilbert Bourne condemned Thomas Tomkins on 9 February 1555. Before condemning Tomkins, Bourne exhorted him to recant. (1563, p. 1103; 1570, p. 1712; 1576, pp. 1461-62; 1583, p. 1535).

On 17 February 1555 Bonner, Bourne and others urged Thomas Higbed and Thomas Causton to recant. (1563, p. 1104; 1570, p. 1716; 1576, p. 1465; 1583, p. 1539).

On 13 August 1553 John Bradford saved Bourne from a riotous crowd when the bishop preached at Paul's Cross. 1563, p. 1173, 1570, p. 1780, 1576, p. 1520 , 1583, p. 1604.

During Bourne's sermon at Paul's Cross on 13 August 1553, he had a dagger thrown at him from the crowd. 1563, p. 1173. The dagger touched Bradford's sleeve. 1570, p. 1788, 1576, p. 1527, 1583, p. 1610. John Bradford took over from him in the pulpit and the crowd's wrath subsided. Bradford then protected him when they left the pulpit. 1563, p. 1173, 1570, p. 1788, 1576, p. 1527, 1583, p. 1610.

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On 14 February 1555 Percival Creswell, an old acqauintance of Bradford's, went to visit Bradford in prison. He offered to make suit for Bradford. He returned later, at 11 o'clock, with another man and gave Bradford a book by More, desiring him to read it. He told Bradford that the lords of York, Lincoln and Bath wished to speak with him. Then at 3 o'clock the same day, Dr Harding, the bishop of Lincoln's chaplain, went to see Bradford in prison. Harding talked of his fear for Bradford's soul, and that he himself had spoken against Peter Martir, Martin Bucer, Luther and others for their beliefs. 1563, p. 1200, 1570, pp. 1790-91, 1576, p. 1529, 1583, pp. 1612-13.

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Philpot's fourth examination was in John Harpsfield's house before Bonner, Bath, Worcester and Gloucester. 1563, pp. 1393-98, 1570, pp. 1965-68, 1576, pp. 1692-95, 1583, pp. 1799-1803.

John Philpot's final examination, on 16 December 1555, was before the bishops of London, Bath, Worcester and Lichfield. 1563, p. 1442, 1570, pp. 1997-98, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1827.

The certificate for Richard Lush's condemnation was discovered by Foxe in Gilbert Bourne's register (Bath and Wells). 1570, p. 2196, 1576, p. 1895, 1583, p. 2004.

Robert Farrer's examination was before the bishops of Durham and Worcester, Sir Robert Rochester, Sir Richard Southwell and Bourne. 1563, p. 1732, 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2136.

Bourne was imprisoned in the Tower after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1993, 1583, p. 2063.

 
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Henry Cole

(1500? - 1580)

LL.D. (1556 - 1557) Archdeacon of Ely (1553). Provost of Eton (1554). Dean of St Paul's (1556). Vicar general to Cardinal Pole. Judge of the archiepiscopal court. Dean of the Arches (1557). (DNB)

Henry Cole was one of the catholic disputants in the Oxford disputations of 1554. During the debates, Cole had short acrimonious exchanges with Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer (1563, pp. 932, 938, 944-46, 951, 955, 969 and 972; 1570, pp. 1591, 1593, 1581[recte 1597]-99, 1602 and 1605-6; 1576, pp. 1358-59, 1362-64, 1367 and 1371; 1583, pp. 1428, 1430, 1433-35, 1438 and 1440-41).

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Later in the disputation, he interrupted the debate and called Latimer a liar (1563, p. 984; 1570, p. 1627; 1576, p 1388; and 1583, p. 1458).

Cole was secretly asked to prepare a funeral sermon for Cranmer. 1563, p. 1498, 1570, p. 2063, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1885.

Cole preached a sermon prior to the martyrdom of Cranmer. 1563, p. 1498, 1570, p. 2065, 1576, p. 1781, 1583, pp. 1885-86.

In an attempt to reinstate catholicism at the University of Cambridge, a commission under the direction of Cardinal Pole ordered the condemning and burning of the bones and books of Phagius and Martin Bucer. Members of the commission were Cuthbert Scott, Nicholas Ormanet, Thomas Watson, John Christopherson and Henry Cole. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570]

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Henry Cole was chosen by Pole to be a persecutor of the University of Cambridge. 1563, p. 1537, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

Cole was sent to King's College, Cambridge, to examine certain scholars on 9 January 1557. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2143, 1576, p. 1863, 1583, p. 1956.

He was awarded a doctorate at Cambridge. 1570, p. 2150, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1963.

William Holcot was charged with treason by Cole and Geffre for supporting Cranmer. 1583, p. 2135.

Cole was one of those holding a commission from Cardinal Pole to disinter Peter Martyr's wife and burn her bones. 1563, p. 1558, 1570, p. 2152, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

He was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Bonner sent Thomas Hinshaw before John Harpsfield and Henry Cole. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Elizabeth Young's eighth examination was before Bonner, the dean of St Paul's and Story. 1570, pp. 2273-74, 1576, pp. 1962-63, 1583, pp. 2069-70.

Her ninth examination took place before the dean. 1570, p. 2274, 1576, p. 1963, 1583, p. 2070.

Cole was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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Henry Morgan

(d. 1559)

Bishop of St David's (1554 - 1559). (DNB)

Henry Morgan was appointed to support Thomas Watson in the disputes in the 1553 convocation. He debated with James Haddon, Richard Cheney and debated very extensively with John Philpot (1563, pp. 912-16; 1570, pp. 1576-78; 1576, pp. 1344-47; 1583, pp. 1415-17).

He was appointed Bishop of St David's c. January 1554, (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1369; 1583, p. 1467).

Together with Edmund Bonner and Gilbert Bourne, Morgan condemned Thomas Tomkins on 9 February 1555. 1563, p. 1103; 1570, p. 1712; 1576, pp. 1461-62; 1583, p. 1535.

He interrogated and tried Robert Ferrar in Carmarthen 26 February - 11 March 1555. Morgan condemned Ferrar on 13 March 1555. 1563, pp. 1098-1100; 1570, pp. 1723-24; 1576, pp. 1471-72; 1583, pp. 1554-55.

Philpot's eighth examination was before Bonner, John Harpsfield, St David's, Mordant and others. 1563, pp. 1419-20, 1570, pp. 1982-83, 1576, pp. 1705-06, 1583, p. 1814.

John Rough, in the presence of the bishop of London, the bishop of St David's and John Feckenham, was degraded and condemned. 1563, p. 1648, 1570, p. 2227, 1576, p. 1923, 1583, p. 2030.

After his condemnation of Ferrar, Henry Morgan fell ill and suffered greatly until his death. 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

He died after Queen Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

[1563, p. 1704, incorrectly lists him among those who died before Queen Mary.]

 
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Hugh Aparry

Victualler for Elizabeth. Of Greenwich.

Early in Elizabeth's reign William Maldon was bound to Hugh Aparry as an apprentice. 1570, p. 2302, 1576, p. 1993, 1583, p. 2102.

 
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Hugh Weston

(1505? - 1558)

Dean of Westminster (1553 - 1556). Archdeacon of Colchester (1554 - 1558). Dean of Windsor (1556 - 1557) [Fasti]. Prolocutor of the Lower House [Diarmaid MacCulloch, Thomas Cranmer: A Life (Yale, 1996), pp. 563-68].

Hugh Weston was appointed Prolocutor of the 1553 Convocation, over which he presided and during which he disputed with Philpot and Aylmer (1563, pp. 906-16; 1570, pp. 1571-78; 1576, pp. 1340-47; and 1583, p. 1410-17).

According to a story related to Sir Thomas White (and printed by Foxe), Sir Thomas Wyatt declared from the scaffold that Elizabeth and Edward Courtenay were innocent of any involvement in his treason. Weston, who was on the scaffold, cried out to the crowd that Wyatt had confessed otherwise before the Privy Council. Allegedly White, on hearing a report of the incident, denounced Weston as a knave (1570, p. 1587; 1576, p. 1355; and 1583, p. 1425).

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Weston was prolocutor (technically Weston was prolocutor of the lower house of convocation) and head of a delegation sent to dispute with Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer (see MacColloch, Cranmer, p. 563) at the Oxford Disputations (1563, pp. 932 and 936; 1570, p. 1591; 1576, p. 1358; 1583, p. 1428).

He received the doctors sent from Cambridge to the disputation (1563, p. 936; 1570, p. 1592; 1576, p. 1358; 1583, p. 1429).

He presided over the Oxford disputations of 1554 (1563, pp. 936-85; 1570, pp. 1592-1627; 1576, pp. 1358-88; 1583, pp. 1429-59).

[NB: A brief account of the entire disputations, which mentions Weston throughout, is given on 1563, pp. 933-35; part of this brief account listing the disputants with Ridley was reprinted in 1570, p. 1606; 1576, p. 1371; and 1583, p. 1441).

Weston presided over John Harpsfield's disputation for his D.D. on 19 April 1554. Weston debated with both Cranmer and Harpsfield (1563, pp. 986-91; 1570, pp. 1627-32; 1576, pp. 1389-92; 1583, pp. 1459-63).

Weston presided over the commissioners at the condemnation of Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer on 20 April 1554 (1563, pp. 935-36; 1570, pp. 1632-33; 1576, p. 1393; 1583, pp. 1463-64).

Weston received a letter from Ridley of 23 April 1554, protesting that he had broken his promise to allow Ridley to examine a copy of the record of his disputation and also protesting the conduct of the disputation and demanding that Weston show Ridley's written answers to the propositions disputed to the Upper House of Convocation. Weston refused to deliver the letter and also a letter of protest which Cranmer had written to the Privy Council over the Disputations (Ridley's letter - included as part of Ridley's account of the disputation - is printed in 1563, p. 977, but Cranmer's letter and Weston's refusal to deliver the letters are not in this edition (see 1570, p. 1633; 1576, pp. 1393-94; 1583, p. 1464).

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Weston received Mary at Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

He preached at Paul's Cross on 20 October 1553, exhorting his auditors to pray for souls in purgatory, denouncing the communion table as an oyster board and denouncing Cranmer's recent catechism (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1466).

He attended the execution of Henry Grey, Duke of Suffolk, (according to Foxe) against the Duke's wishes. Also (according to Foxe) Weston was heckled by the crowd (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, pp. 1467-68).

He participated, together with Gilbert Bourne and Frances Mallet, in an effort to persuade Walter Mantell to recant (1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1398; 1583, p. 1468).

When Sir Thomas Wyatt at his execution cleared Elizabeth and the Earl of Devon of involvement in his rebellion, Weston declared that this contradicted what Wyatt had earlier told the Privy Council. Wyatt retorted that what he said now was true (1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469).

A prayer Weston made for the safe delivery of a child by Queen Mary is printed in 1563, p. 1015 (Latin and English versions); 1570, p. 1653; 1576, p. 1410; 1583, pp. 1480-81 (English only).

Foxe calls Weston a man whom 'all good and godly men worthily despise' and prints Laurence Saunders' account of Weston's attempting to persuade Nicholas Grimald and Saunders to recant. 1563, pp. 1041-42; 1570, p. 1667; 1576, p. 1422; 1583, p. 1496.

Weston was reported by Hooper to have obtained a commission in May 1554 to establish a disputation, despite its illegality. 1570, p. 1687; 1576, p. 1440; 1583, p. 1513.

On 21 March 1555 Bradford talked with Dr Weston, after being told of Weston's intention to visit via the earl of Derby's servant (when master Collier, Warden of Manchester had come to dinner at the Counter). 1576, p.1536. Bradford and Westo spoke to each other in the presence of Master Collier, the earl of Derby's servant, the subdean of Westminster, the keeper (Master Clayden), and others. 1570, 1799-80, 1576, pp.1536-7, 1583, pp.1619-20.

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On 25 February, at about 5pm, Master Weston visited Bradford and asked to speak with him in private. When the two men were alone, Weston thanked Bradford for his writings to him and then produced the work that Bradford had sent him. It was entitled, 'Certayne reasons againste Transubstantiation gathered by John Bradforde, and geuen to Doctour weston and others'. 1563, p. 1212. They discussed transubstantiation. 1563, pp. 1211-12, 1570, pp. 1801-2. [In 1570 this meeting is dated as the afternoon of 28 March].

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On 25 February (1563) or 28 March (1570 onwards) Weston told John Bradford of Grimald's recantation. 1563, p. 1212, 1570, p. 1801, 1576, p. 1538., 1583, p. 1621.

Bradford's reasons against transubstantiation were given to Weston and others. 1563, pp. 1211-12, 1570, pp. 1800-1, 1576, pp. 1537-38, 1583, pp. 1620-21.

On 5 April, at 2pm, Weston went to visit Bradford in the Counter. Weston had not visited him earlier due to ill health and also because he had been busy withstanding monks from entering Westminster. He also thought that Pendleton would be coming to see him. Weston told Bradford that the pope was dead and that Weston had petitioned the queen and so thought that death would not come to Bradford soon. 1570, p. 1802, 1576, pp. 1538-39, 1583, pp. 1621-22.

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As Weston left Bradford on 5 April, he set for Master Weale. 1570, p. 1802, 1576, p. 1539, 1583, p. 1622.

After Weston left Bradford on 5 April, the keeper, Master Claydon, and Steven Bech came to Bradford and spoke unkindly to Bradford even though they had hitherto appeared to be friendly to him. 1570, p. 1802, 1576, pp. 1538-39, 1583, pp. 1621-22.

Weston was one of the audience at the re-examination of Ridley and Latimer and interjected a question. 1563, p. 1363; 1570, p. 1926, 1576, p. 1652, 1583, p. 1761.

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

Cranmer was condemned by Weston and others of the university. He was committed to the mayors and sherriffs of Oxford. 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Hugh Weston displeased Pole for being willing to give up his deanery.

Weston was caught committing adultery and appealed to Rome for clemency.

He died after Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
James Turberville

(d. 1570?)

DD (1532). Bishop of Exeter (1555) (DNB)

John Harpsfield wrote a letter to Bonner about Whittle's subscription, in which he mentioned having had dinner with the bishop of Exeter. 1563, pp. 1455-56, 1570, pp. 2017-18, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, p. 1846.

James Turberville examined and condemned Mrs Prest. 1563, p. 1737, 1570, p. 2249, 1576, pp. 1943-45, 1583, p. 2049.

He was imprisoned in the Tower after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
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John Apowel

Former serving man. Of Greenwich.

Hugh Aparry gave meat and drink to Apowel until he could find a position in service. 1570, p. 2302, 1576, p. 1993, 1583, pp. 2102-03.

William Maldon found a primer to read in English. John Apowel mocked Maldon for reading the primer but then suddenly became afraid and asked for God's mercy. Apowel continually cried out that he saw the devil for around six days and so was sent to Bedlam. 1570, p. 2302, 1576, p. 1993, 1583, pp. 2102-03.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Boxall

(d. 1571)

DD (1558). Archdeacon and prebend of Ely, Winchester, St Paul's. Dean of Windsor (1554). Dean of Peterbrough (1557). Dean of Norwich and Windsor (1557). Registrar of the Order of the Garter (1557 - 1558). Prebend of York and Salisbury (1558). Removed as Secretary of State to make way for William Cecil. Committed to the Tower by Matthew Parker (1560) (DNB)

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Elizabeth stayed in John Boxall's house for one night on her way through Windsor. 1563, p. 1713, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2290.

He was imprisoned in the Tower after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1993.

 
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John Christopherson

(d. 1558)

Master of Trinity College, Cambridge (1553 ? 1558); bishop of Chichester (1557 - 1558). Master of Trinity College (1553 - 1558). Dean of Norwich (1554 - 1557). Chaplain and confessor to Queen Mary. (DNB)

Christopherson was sent to Cambridge University by Stephen Gardiner with articles ordering that every scholar wear the proper vestments, pronounce Greek in the traditional pronounciation and declare the whole style of the king and queen in their sermons (1563, p. 1007; 1570, pp. 1646-47; 1576, p 1405; and 1583, p. 1475).

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John Christopherson condemned Robert Pygot and William Wolsey on 9 October 1555. 1570, p. 1893, 1576, p. 1621, 1583, p. 1715.

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

In an attempt to reinstate catholicism at the University of Cambridge, a commission under the direction of Cardinal Pole ordered the condemning and burning of the bones and books of Phagius and Martin Bucer. Members of the commission were Cuthbert Scott, Nicholas Ormanet, Thomas Watson, John Christopherson and Henry Cole. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570]

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John Christopherson was chosen by Pole to be a persecutor of the University of Cambridge. 1563, p. 1537, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

Christopherson attempted to sprinkle scholars of Trinity College with holy water at the gatehouse to the college, but they refused it. Nicholas Carre wrote a letter to John Cheke about Martin Bucer, which was then passed on to Peter Martyr. 1563, p. 1540, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1957.

Scot, Watson and Christopherson discussed and agreed to the exhumation of Bucer and Phagius. . 1563, p. 1540, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1957.

Christopherson did not attend King's College on 14 January 1557 with the other commissioners. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2146, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1960.

He was taken sick during Watson's Candlemas sermon and began babbling. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2146, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1960.

Some present at Watson's sermon said that Christopherson had become sick because he had been accused of false accounting at the college and that he had witnessed his brother-in-law's lease being cancelled on the manor of the college because the covenants seemed unreasonable. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2146, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1960.

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Richard Woodman's first examination before Christopherson, Story, Cooke and others took place on 14 April 1557. 1563, pp. 1573-79, 1570, p. 2174-78, 1576, pp. 1877-81, 1583, pp. 1986-89.

Woodman's second examination before Christopherson and two of his chaplains, as well as Story, took place on 27 April 1557. 1563, pp. 1582-87, 1570, pp. 2178-82, 1576, pp. 1881-84, 1583, pp. 2089-92.

The sixth and last examination of Woodman took place before Chichester, Roper, Nicholas Harpsfield, the fat priest, Winchester and others. 1563, 1599-1601, 1570, p. 2192-94, 1576, p. 1892-93, 1583, pp. 2000-02.

He accused and examined several prisoners in Chichester. 1563, p. 1634, 1570, p. 2220, 1576, p. 1815, 1583, p. 2023.

He died after Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992.

 
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John Feckenham

(1518? - 1585)

Dean of St Paul's. Last abbot of Westminster. [DNB]

Feckenham was made dean of St Paul's on Midsummer's Day, 1554. 1563, p. 1151; 1570, pp. 1636 and 1760; 1576, pp. 1396 and 1551 [recte 1503]; 1583, pp. 1467 and 1587

He conversed with Thomas Hawkes in June 1554 trying to persuade him to recant. 1563, pp. 1153-54; 1570, p. 1762; 1576, p. 1505; 1583, pp. 1588-89

In the letter exhibited by Bonner about Bartlett Green, reference was made to John Dee and Feckenham. 1563, pp. 1444-45, 1570, p. 1999, 1576, pp. 1721-22, 1583, p. 1828.

Feckenham traveled to Colchester with Bishop Bonner to try to win Thomas Causton and Thomas Higbed back to catholicism. 1563, p. 1104; 1570, p. 1716; 1576, p. 1465; 1583, p. 1539.

He tried to persuade Hooper to recant after he was condemned on 29 January 1555. The effort was unsuccessful but false rumors spread that Hooper had recanted. 1563, p. 1057; 1570, p. 1680; 1576, p. 1434; 1583, p. 1507.

Feckenham was one of those who presided over an examination of Thomas Tomkins on 9 February 1555. 1570, p. 1712; 1576, p. 1461; 1583, p. 1535.

He was one of those who examined first Thomas Causton, and then Thomas Higbed, in Bonner's palace on 8 March 1555. 1563, p. 1105; 1570, p. 1718; 1576, p. 1466; 1583, p. 1540.

He wrote a ballad, Caveat emptor , on the subject of the restoration of monastic lands. 1570, p. 1729; 1576, p. 1497; 1583, p. 1559.

Feckenham received a letter from William Paulet. 1563, p. 1239, 1570, p. 1860, 1576, p. 1592, 1583, p. 1680.

He discussed eucharistic doctrine with Bartlett Green. 1563, pp. 1463-64, 1570, pp. 2025-26, 1576, p. 1746, 1583, p. 1854.

Feckenham claimed that Green was converted by Peter Martyr's lectures and that Zwingli, Luther, Oecolampadius and Carolostadius could never agree doctrine. 1563, pp. 1463-64, 1570, pp. 2025-26,, 1576, p. 1746, 1583, p. 1854.

[In a letter that was never delivered] Bartlett Green told John Philpot of his presentment on 17 November before Bonner and two bishops, Master Dean, Roper, Welch, John Harpsfield, and two or three others. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

A letter by the thirteen prisoners reproaching Feckenham for his slander dated Feckenham's sermon as 14 June 1556. 1563, pp. 1526-27, 1570, p. 2097, 1576, pp. 1809-10, 1583, p. 1916.

Feckenham spoke up in defence of John Cheke. 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1955.

 
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John Harpsfield

(1516 - 1578)

Chaplain to Bishop Bonner. Archdeacon of London (1554 - 1559); dean of Norwich (1558 - 1559). Brother of Nicholas Harpsfield. [DNB; Fasti]

Harpsfield preached a sermon at the commencement of the 1553 convocation (1570, p. 1571; 1576, p. 1340; and 1583, p. 1410).

He sparred with Philpot in the debates at the 1553 convocation. (See 1563, pp. 909, 912 and 914-15; 1570, pp. 1573-74 and 1576-78; 1576, pp. 1342 and 1345-46 and 1583, pp. 1412 and 1416-17).

He was one of the catholic disputants at the Oxford disputations of 1554; he debated with Cranmer and Ridley (1563, pp. 932-34, 938, 955, 967-69 and 978; 1570, pp. 1591-93 and 1605-6; 1576, pp. 1358-59 and 1370-71; 1583, pp. 1428, 1430 and 1440-41).

Harpsfield disputed on the eucharist for his D.D. on 19 April 1554; Cranmer disputed with him (1563, pp. 986-91; 1570, pp. 1627-32; 1576, pp. 1389-92; 1583, pp. 1459-63).

He gave a Latin oration in St Paul's before King Philip (1570, p. 1643; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

He witnessed Bonner's burning Tomkins' hand with a candle, and he urged Bonner to cease the torture (1570, pp. 1710-11; 1576, p. 1460; 1583, p.1534).

Together with William Chedsey and John Feckenham, Harpsfield attempted to persuade John Hooper to recant after his condemnation on 29 January 1555. The attempt was unsuccessful but it caused false rumors of Hooper's recantation to spread (1563, p. 1057; 1570, p. 1680; 1576, p. 1434; 1583, p. 1507).

Harpsfield witnessed the degradation of John Rogers and John Hooper on 4 February 1555 (1563, p. 1058; 1570, p. 1681; 1576, p. 1435; 1583, p. 1508).

He was one of those who presided over the examination of Thomas Tomkins on 9 February 1555 (1570, p. 1712; 1576, p. 1461; 1583, p. 1535).

Harpsfield was one of those who examined Thomas Causton and Thomas Higbed on 18 February 1555 (1563, p. 1104). Bonner ordered him to deliver a rebuttal to the confession of faith of Thomas Causton and Thomas Higbed (1563, p. 1107; 1570, p. 1719; 1576, p. 1468; 1583, p. 1541).

He conversed with Thomas Hawkes in June 1554, arguing the necessity of infant baptism. 1563, pp. 1151-52;1570, pp. 1760-61; 1576, p. 1551 [recte 1503]; 1583, pp. 1587-88

He escorted Thomas Hawkes to the Gatehouse at Westminster on 1 July 1554. 1563, p. 1156; 1570, p. 1765;1576, p. 1765; 1583, p. 1590

John Harpsfield conferred with the bishop of Durham about John Bradford. 1563, p. 1191, 1570, p. 1787, 1576, p. 1526, 1583, p. 1609.

On 16 February 1555 John Harpsfield and two others went to see Bradford in prison, to defend the line of bishops in the catholic church. Bradford refuted the argument. 1563, pp. 1202-03, 1570, pp. 1792-93, 1576, pp. 1530-31, 1583, pp. 1614-15.

Smith was examined by Bonner and Harpsfield, among others, met with Harwood in the garden, and was re-examined. Smith was then left in the garden until Harwood was examined, after which Smith was examined again. 1563, pp. 1252-55, 1570, pp. 1870-72, 1576, pp. 1601-03, 1583, pp. 1691-92.

Robert Smith was examined by John Dee, Harpsfield and Bonner on eucharistic doctrine. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

Philpot's fourth examination was in John Harpsfield's house before Bonner, Bath, Worcester and Gloucester. 1563, pp. 1393-98, 1570, pp. 1965-68, 1576, pp. 1692-95, 1583, pp. 1799-1803.

[In a letter that was never delivered] Green told Philpot of his presentment on 17 November before Bonner and two bishops, Master Dean, Roper, Welch, John Harpsfield, and two or three others. Dr Dale, Master George Mordant and Master Dee were also there. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

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Philpot's eighth examination was before Bonner, John Harpsfield, St David's, Mordant and others. 1563, pp. 1419-20, 1570, pp. 1982-83, 1576, pp. 1705-06, 1583, p. 1814.

During Philpot's ninth examination, Bonner called for John Harpsfield, who attended the session to examine Philpot, and Chadsey, who had however left for Westminster. 1563, pp. 1420-24, 1570, pp. 1983-85, 1576, pp. 1707-09, 1583, pp. 1815-16.

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

Later on the day of his thirteenth examination, Philpot spoke with John Harpsfield, Bonner and Chadsey. 1570, pp. 1996-97, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, pp. 1823-24.

John Harpsfield urged Thomas Whittle to recant and composed a bill of submission for Whittle to sign. 1563, pp. 1454-55, 1570, p. 2017, 1576, p. 1737, 1583, pp. 1845-46.

John Harpsfield wrote a letter to Bonner about Whittle's suscription. It mentioned one of Penbroke's men who wanted license to erect a school. Harpsfield hoped for Penbroke's sake that it be requested, and he and M Johnson (Register) were working to that effect. 1563, pp. 1455-56, 1570, pp. 2017-18, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, pp. 1846-47. [In all editions after 1563, the heading incorrectly gives the author of the letter as Nicholas Harpsfield.]

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Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2097.

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Bonner sent Thomas Hinshaw before John Harpsfield and Henry Cole. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Bonner attended evensong with John Harpsfield prior to causing several boys to be beaten in 1558. 1563, p. 1692, 1570, p. 2264, 1576, p. 1955, 1583, p. 2061.

Bonner and Harpsfield laughed at and mocked Edward Benet for his beliefs. 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Harpsfield was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Hopton

(d. 1558)

Bishop of Norwich (1554 - 1558) [DNB]

John Hopton was created bishop of Norwich (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

On 12 May 1555 the privy council ordered that Thomas Ross be delivered to Hopton to be made to recant or to be tried for heresy (1583, p. 1577).

Hopton was one of the commissioners who condemned John Bradford, Laurence Saunders and Rowland Taylor to death. 1570, p. 1699; 1576, p. 1450; 1583, pp. 1523-24.

On 12 May 1555 the privy council ordered that Thomas Ross be delivered to Hopton, either to be forced to recant, or to be tried for heresy. 1583, p. 1577.

James Abbes was caught and appeared before Dr Hopton. He recanted but when the bishop gave him 40 or 20 pence [Foxe is not sure] he recanted. He was burned in Bury on 2 August 1555. 1563, p. 1244, 1570, pp. 1864-65, 1576, p. 1594, 1583, p. 1683.

Robert Samuel was cruelly treated by Dr Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and/or Dr Dunnings, the chancellor [Foxe is not sure]. 1563, p. 1270, 1570, p. 1898, 1576, p. 1609, 1583, p. 1703.

William Allen was examined and condemned by the bishop of Norwich. 1570, p. 1883, 1576, p. 1613, 1583, p. 1707.

Roger Coo was examined by the bishop of Norwich, 12 August, 1555. 1563, pp. 1272-73, 1570, pp. 1883-84, 1576, p. 1613, 1583, p. 1707.

Thomas Cobbe was examined by Dunning but condemned by the bishop of Norwich with Roger Coo, William Allen, James Abbes, and Robert Samuel. He was burned at Thetford in September 1556. 1563, p. 1271, 1570, p. 1884, 1576, pp. 1613-14 , 1583, p. 1708.

Thomas Spicer, John Denny and Edmund Poole were condemned by John Hopton and Dunning and handed over to Sir John Silliard, high sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk. 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Roger Bernard was examined and condemned by Hopton. Adam Foster was sent to the Eye prison and then to Norwich to be examined and then condemned by Hopton. 1563, pp. 1527-28, 1570, pp. 2098-99, 1576, pp. 1810-11, 1583, p. 1917.

The second, third and fourth examinations of John Fortune were conducted by Hopton. 1570, pp. 2100-01, 1576, p. 1812, 1583, pp. 1918-19.

Peter and Anne Moone were presented before Hopton (bishop of Norwich) and Dunning (chancellor) during their visitation of Ipswich in 1556. Three articles were presented against Peter Moone and his answers given. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Simon Miller was imprisoned in the bishop's house. He was condemned by Hopton and his chancellor, Michael Dunning. 1563, pp. 1602-03, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

The second examination of Thomas Spurdance was by Hopton. 1570, pp. 2221-22, 1576, pp. 1917-18, 1583, pp. 2024-25.

John Fortune's second and third examinations were conducted by the bishop of Norwich, who condemned him. 1563, pp. 1636-38.

James Ashley was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Thomas Carman was examined and condemned by Hopton.1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

John Cooke was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Berry sent Thomas Hudson before Hopton. 1563, p. 1657, 1570, p. 2233, 1576, p. 1928, 1583, p. 2036.

Alexander Lane was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Robert Miles was examined by Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and Dr Spenser, his chancellor, as well as Sir Edward Waldegrave. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1941, 1583, p. 2047.

Thomas Rose's second examination was before Hopton, W. Woodhouse, Dr Barret and others1570, p. 1978, 1576, pp. 1978-79, 1583, p. 2084.

Thomas Rose's last appearance was before Woodhouse and Hopton. 1570, p. 1979, 1576, pp. 1980-81, 1583, pp. 2085-86.

After being questioned by Sir John Tyrrel, William Seaman was sent before Bishop Hopton who then condemned him. 1563, p. 1655, 1570, p. 2232, 1576, p. 1927, 1583, p. 2035.

John Noyes was condemned by the bishop of Norwich before Dunning, Sir W. Woodhouse, Sir Thomas Woodhouse, George Heyden, Master Spense, W. Farrar (alderman), Master Thurston, Winesden and others. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

John Hopton died after Queen Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

[1563, p. 1707, correctly states that Hopton died before Queen Mary. He died in August 1558.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John White

(1510? - 1560)

Bishop of Lincoln (1554 - 1556), bishop of Winchester (1556 - 1559) (Fasti; DNB)

John White was created bishop of Lincoln in 1554 (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

He was the author of commendatory verses for Philip and Mary's marriage, (1563, p. 1004; 1570, p. 1642; 1576, p. 1401; 1583, p. 1471).

On 14 February 1555 Percival Creswell, an old acqauintance of Bradford's, went to visit Bradford in prison. He offered to make suit for Bradford. He returned later, at 11 o'clock, with another man and gave Bradford a book by More, desiring him to read it. He told Bradford that the lords of York, Lincoln and Bath wished to speak with him. Then at 3 o'clock the same day, Dr Harding, the bishop of Lincoln's chaplain, went to see Bradford in prison. Harding talked of his fear for Bradford's soul, and that he himself had spoken against Peter Martir, Martin Bucer, Luther and others for their beliefs. 1563, p. 1200, 1570, pp. 1790-91, 1576, p. 1529, 1583, pp. 1612-13.

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An examination of Ridley and Latimer was conducted by White (Lincoln), Brookes (Gloucester) and Holyman (Bristol) on 30 September 1555. White, Brookes and Holyman received their commission from Cardinal Pole. 1563, pp. 1297-98, 1570, pp. 1903-09, 1576, pp. 1631-39, 1583, pp. 1757-60.

White was present during the second private conference between Philpot and Bonner. 1563, pp. 1419-20, 1570, pp. 1982-83, 1576, pp. 1706-07, 1583, pp. 1812-13.

Thomas Benbridge was examined by John White, bishop of Winchester. 1563, p. 1667, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1940, 1583, p. 2046.

John White would not be swayed by the truth of Gratwick's argument. 1570, p. 2162, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1976.

Woodman's fourth examination took place before White (Winchester), Rochester, a certain doctor and others on 25 May 1557. 1563, pp. 1596-99, 1570, pp. 2188-90, 1576, pp. 1889-90, 1583, pp. 1997-99.

Woodman's fifth examination took place before Winchester, Nicholas Harpsfield, Langdale, a fat-headed priest, and many others at St Mary Overy's church on 15 June 1557. 1563, pp. 1599-1601, 1570, pp. 2190-92, 1576, pp. 1890-92, 1583, pp. 1999-2000.

The sixth and last examination of Woodman took place before Chichester, Roper, Nicholas Harpsfield, the fat priest, Winchester and others. He was condemned by Winchester and others.1563, 1599-1601, 1570, p. 2192-94, 1576, p. 1892-93, 1583, pp. 2000-02.

White was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

He died after Queen Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
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Maurice (Mauritius) (St Maurice)

(d. late C3 - early C4) [Catholic Encyclopedia]

Roman leader of Theban Legion; Christian; massacred with his men

Maurice, having had his troops decimated twice, encouraged them to martyrdom. 1570, p. 111; 1576, p. 79; 1583, p. 79.

Foxe gives an account of the blessing in Rome by Pope Marcellus of Maurice and his troops and of their subsequent martyrdom for refusing to sacrifice to Maximian's gods. 1570, pp. 113-14; 1576, p. 81; 1583, pp. 80-81.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Nicholas Harpsfield

(1519? - 1575)

Archdeacon of Canterbury; vicar-general of London. Author of the most important contemporary attack on the Acts and Monuments. Younger brother of John Harpsfield [DNB]

Nicholas Harpsfield discussed the sacrament and ceremonies with Thomas Hawkes on 30 June 1554, but soon gave up hope of changing Hawke's opinions. 1563, p. 1156; 1570, p. 1764; 1576, p. 1507; 1583, p. 1590

Harpsfield took depositions regarding John Tooley's heretical speech from the gallows. 1563, p. 1144

He examined Thomas Wattes on 4 May 1555 and he urged Wattes to recant. Wattes refused, telling Harpsfield that his efforts were in vain. 1563, p. 1165; 1570, p. 1771; 1576, p. 1512; 1583, 1596

Nicholas Harpsfield is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

On 28 May Nicholas Harpsfield had the mayor's sergeant bring John Bland before him, and Master Collins (comissary), in Thornden's house. Talk took place between Harspfield, Collins and Bland. 1563, pp. 1220-21, 1570, pp. 1845-46, 1576, pp. 1579-80, 1583, p. 1667.

On 21 May Bland appeared in the chapter house before Nicholas Harspfield. 1563, pp. 1221-23, 1570 p. 1846, 1576 p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Bland asked that Richard Thornden, bishop of Dover, and Robert Collins, commissary, be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Nicholas Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Nicholas Sheterden discussed eucharistic doctrine with the archdeacon Nicholas Harpsfield and Robert Collins. 1563, pp. 1231-32, 1570, p. 1853, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, pp. 1673-74.

William Cokar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Richard Colliar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Hopper was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Henry Lawrence was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Sterne was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

George Brodbridge was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August for having refused to say confession to a priest. 1563, p. 1273. The examination is referred to in 1570, p. 1884, 1576, p. 1614, 1583, p. 1708.

Anthony Burwarde was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

Robert Streater was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

James Tutrye was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

John Webbe was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden. 1563, pp. 1386-87, 1570, pp. 1959-60, 1576, p. 1687, 1583, p. 1794.

Harpsfield is described as a great persecutor. 1563, p. 1546, 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1954.

Thomas Alsey met with John Kingston to discuss the delivery of forty-six shillings and eight pence to Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Martin Bradbridge was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Final was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Hay was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Thomas Hudson was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Stephen Kempe was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Lowick was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

John Philpot of Tenterden was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Matthew Plaise was examined by Thornden, Nicholas Harpsfield and Collins. 1570, pp. 2169-71, 1576, pp. 1873-75, 1583, pp. 1982-83.

Harpsfield took part in Richard Woodman's fifth and sixth examinations. 1563, pp. 1599-1601, 1570, pp. 2190-94, 1576, pp. 1890-93, 1583, pp. 1999-2002.

William Prowting was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Thomas Stephens was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Waterman was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Harpsfield urged on the condemnation of five martyrs at Canterbury so that they could be burned before the death of Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

Harpsfield was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Nicholas Heath

(1501? - 1578)

Bishop of Worcester (1543 - 1551, 1553 - 1555). Archbishop of York (1555 - 1560). Lord Chancellor (1556 - 1559). Descended from the Heaths of Apsley, Tamworth. [DNB]

Heath was deprived as bishop of Worcester under Edward VI; he was reinstated by Mary. 1563, p. 1053; 1570, p. 1678; 1576, p. 1432; 1583, p. 1505.

He was one of the commissioners who interrogated Robert Ferrar on 4 February 1555. 1563, p. 1732; 1570, pp. 1722-23; 1576, p. 1471; 1583, pp. 1553-54.

On 23 February 1555 the archbishop of York (Nicholas Heath) and the bishop of Chichester (George Day) went to the Counter to speak with Bradford. Heath was gentle towards Bradford when they met. Heath told Bradford that they had not been sent to him but that they had come out of love and charity. Heath knew Bradford better than Day did. 1563, pp. 1204-08, 1570, pp. 1794-97, 1576, pp. 1532-34, 1583, pp. 1615-17.

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A discussion about salvation and other things took place between Bradford and Heath and Day, which lasted three hours. 1563, pp. 1204-08.

Heath and Day left Bradford because the bishop of Durham was waiting at Master York's house. 1563, p. 1208.

Ridley was kind to Heath during Edward VI's reign. 1563, p. 1285, 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

Philpot's fourth examination was in John Harpsfield's house before Bonner, Bath, Worcester [Heath] and Gloucester. 1563, pp. 1393-98, 1570, pp. 1965-68, 1576, pp. 1692-95, 1583, pp. 1799-1803.

Philpot's twelfth examination on 4 December 1555 was before Bonner, Worcester and Bangor. 1563, pp. 1434-37, 1570, pp. 1992-96, 1576, pp. 1715-17, 1583, pp. 1822-24.

During Philpot's twelfth examination, Worcester told Philpot that Durham and Chichester would be coming to speak with him. 1563, pp. 1434-37, 1570, pp. 1992-96, 1576, pp. 1715-17, 1583, pp. 1822-24.

Philpot spoke with Worcester, Wright and Chadsey later the same day. 1570, pp. 1993-94, 1576, p. 1717, 1583, pp. 1823-24.

Philpot's thirteenth examination was before York [Heath], Chichester and others. 1570, p. 1996, 1576, pp. 1717-19, 1583, pp. 1824-26.

The last examination of Philpot was on 16 December 1555 before Bonner and other bishops, including York. 1563, p. 1441, 1570, pp. 1997-98, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1827.

After Cromwell was apprehended, Bishops Heath and Skip forsook Cranmer and stood against him. 1570, p. 2040, 1576, p. 1759, 1583, pp. 1865-66.

Heath questioned Cranmer about his bill against the mass. 1570, p. 2047, 1576, pp. 1764-64, 1583, p. 1871.

Drakes, Tyms, Spurge, Cavell and Ambrose petitioned Heath over their long imprisonment. 1563, p. 1504, 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

The receipt of a writ about Thomas Spicer, John Denny and Edmund Poole from Heath was delayed. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Robert Farrer was examined before the bishops of Durham and Worcester, Sir Robert Rochester, Sir Richard Southwell and Gilbert Bourne. 1563, p. 1732, 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2136.

On 15 December 1557 a letter was sent by the archbishop of York, the earl of Shrewsbury, Edward Hastings, Anthony Montague, John Bourne and Henry Jernegam (members of the privy council) to Bishop Bonner along with the examinations of John Rough. They sent Rough to Newgate. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2226, 1576, pp. 1921-22., 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

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Nicholas Heath was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

He was imprisoned in the Tower after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1993, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Owen Oglethorpe

(d. 1559)

President of Magdalen College, Oxford (1535 - 1552 and 1553 - 1559); dean of Windsor (1554 - 1556); bishop of Carlisle (1557 - 1559). Performed the coronation ceremony for Elizabeth. [see DNB ].

Owen Oglethorpe was one of the participants in the Oxford disputations of 1554 (1563, pp. 936-38, 943-44, 969 and 971; 1570, pp. 1591-93, 1596-981[recte 1597], 1616 and 1618; 1576, pp. 1358-59, 1362 and 1379-80 and 1583, pp. 1428-30, 1432-33, 1449 and 1451).

[NB: A brief account of the Oxford disputations, only in 1563, mentions Oglethorpe debating with Cranmer (1563, p. 933). He is listed as debating with Ridley (1563, p. 934; 1570, p. 1606; 1576, p. 1371; 1583, p. 1441).]

According to Foxe, Oglethorpe was present when William Glynn asked Ridley's forgiveness for insulting him during Ridley's disputation on 17 April (1563, p. 971; 1570, p. 1618; 1576, p. 1380; 1583, p. 1451).

Elizabeth spent the night at the house of the dean of Windsor on her way to Woodstock. 1570, p. 2292, 1576, p. 1985, 1583, p. 2094.

Oglethorpe was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

Owen Oglethorpe died after Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Ralph Bayne

(d. 1559)

Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield (1554 - 1559) [DNB]

Latimer's adversaries are listed: bishop of Ely (preached against him in King's College); Dr Watson (Master of Christ's College); Dr Norton (Master of Clare); Dr Philo (Master of Michael House); Dr Metcalfe (Master of St John); Dr Blith (of the King's Hall); Dr Bullock (Master of Queen's College); Dr Palmes (Master of St Nicholas hostel); Bayne, Rud and Greenwood of St John's; Brikenden, of St John's also, and said to have been a scholar of Latimer's. 1563, p. 1307, 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

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Robert Glover believed that after Bayne and Draycot had read his letter to the mayor of Coventry they had decided to attempt to do away with Glover while he was in prison 1570, p. 1888, 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

In the letter to his wife, Glover stated that he was examined before the bishop of Coventry in Denton's house . 1563, pp. 1273-80, 1570, pp. 1886-89, 1576, pp. 1615-19, 1583, pp. 1710-12.

Robert Glover was examined and condemned by Draycot and Bayne. 1563, p. 1281, 1570, p1889., 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

When friends and family of William Glover tried to have Glover buried in his local church, Bernard, the clerk (whom Foxe believed still to be clerk in 1570), refused his burial. Bernard rode to bishop Raufe Bayne for advice. After two days and one night, Bernard returned with a letter from Bayne which demanded that Glover not be buried in the churchyard. Some of the villagers dragged his body by horse (as it had now begun to stink so badly they could not touch him) and then buried him in a broom field. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1891, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

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Bayne wrote a letter to the parish of Weme. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1891, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

Cornelius Bungey was condemned by Ralph Baynes, bishop of Coventry. Articles were raised against Bungey which he answered. 1563, pp. 1282-83, 1570, p. 1890, 1576, p. 1619, 1583, p. 1714.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

John Philpot's final examination, on 16 December 1555, was before the bishops of London, Bath, Worcester and Lichfield. 1563, p. 1442, 1570, pp. 1997-98, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1827.

John Colstock, Nicholas Ball, Thomas Flyer, Thomas Pyot, Henry Crimes and Thomas Johnson, among others, were examined in the diocese of Lichfield by Ralph Bayne for his beliefs. 1563, p. 1528, 1570, p. 2098, 1576, p. 1810, 1583, p. 1917.

Bayne persecuted Joan Waste of Derby. 1563, p. 1545, 1570, p. 2137, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1951.

He is described by Foxe as the cruel bishop of Coventry. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Draycot and Bayne examined the following but later dismissed them: John Adale, Anthony Afterwhittle, Thomas Arch, Thomas Arnal, John Avines, Henry Birdlim, Eustache Bysacre, Julius Dudley, William Enderby, Richard Foxal, John Frankling, Anthony Jones, Richard Kempe, John Leach, Hugh Lynacres, Thomas Lynacres, William Marler, Hugh Moore, William Mosley, Martin Newman, Isabel Parker, Cicely Preston, John Richardson, John Robinson, Thomas Sailter, William Shene, John Stamford, Thomas Steilbe, Thomas Underdone, Francis Ward, Richard Weaver, Thomas Wilson, and Richard Woodburne. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

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Robert Aston was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Richard Bayly was examined by Draycot and Bayne and deprived. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

John Borsley the younger was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Agnes Foreman was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield on 12 September 1556. 1563, p. 1547, 1570, p. 2141 , 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1954.

Edward Hawkes was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

William Kaime was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Robert Katrenes was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Joyce Lewes was examined by Draycot and Bayne in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in October 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Robert Mossey was examined and deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Norris was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Anselm Sele was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Richard Slavy was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Smith was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Stiffe was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

John Waterhouse was examined and forced by Draycot and Bayne to do penance. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

William Taylor and Henry Tecka were deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

A citation to appear before the bishop was delivered to Joyce Lewes' husband, who furiously insisted that the summoner return it, lest he would force him to eat it, which he forced him to do at dagger-point. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Joyce Lewes and her husband were commanded to appear before the bishop. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Although her husband submitted, Joyce Lewes refused. The bishop gave her one month's respite and returned her to her husband, who was bound to the sum of £100 to return her to submit at the end of one month. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

John Glover and others pleaded with Joyce Lewes' husband not to send her to the bishop and so forfeit the money but he refused. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

As Lewes took a drink, she said that she drank to all those who loved the gospel and desired the abolition of papistry. Several of the town's women drank from the same cup and were were examined by the bishop and his chancellor and later forced to do penance. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

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Ralph Bayne was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

Ralph Bayne died after Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Pates

(d. 1565)

Bishop of Worcester (1555 - 1559). (DNB; Fasti)

A Henrician act of attainder against Richard Pates was reversed in parliament in 1555 (1570, p. 1654; 1576, p. 1411; 1583, p. 1481).

He was one of John Rogers' examiners on 22 January 1555 (1563, pp. 1023-26; 1570, pp. 1657-59; 1576, pp. 1414-15; 1583, pp. 1484-86).

Pates was present at John Bradford's first examination on 22 January 1555. 1563, p. 1187; 1570, p. 1784; 1576, p. 1523; 1583, p. 1607.

Richard Pates was imprisoned in the Tower after the death of Mary and later died. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

[Also referred to as 'Pate'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Seth Holland

(d. 1561)

Dean of Worcester (1557 - 1559). Witness to Cardinal Pole's will. Deprived of all preferments upon the accession of Elizabeth. (CSPD; Fasti)

Seth Holland died in the Tower after Queen Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Thomas Cornwallis

(1518/19 - 1604)

MP [1547, 1553, 1554, 1558], Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk (1552 - 1530, Comptroller of the Royal Household (1557 - 1558). (DNB; Bindoff

On 15 April 1555, Cornwallis was ordered by the Privy Council to interrogate William Flower and also to have Bishop Bonner and the Middlesex JPs initiate both religious and secular proceedings against William Flower. 1583, p. 1561.

Sentence against six martyred at Brentford was read by Darbyshire in the presence of Sir Edward Hastings and Sir Thomas Cornwallis. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2241, 1576, p. 1935, 1583, p. 2039.

The sheriff, Sir Thomas Cornwallis, made a bill against William Brown. 1570, p. 2268, 1576, p. 1958, 1583, p. 2065.

After Wyatt's rebellion, he went to see Elizabeth at Ashridge and found her to be unwell. 1563, p. 1711, 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

Foxe refers to his repair to London out of Essex with Clinton and others. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

[A recusant in Elizabeth's reign (Bindoff).]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Slethurst

Dean of Worcester. Warden of All Souls' College, Oxford.

Slethurst died after Queen Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

[NB: No one of that name was either dean of Worcester or warden of All Souls'. The nearest is Thomas Slythurst (1510? - 1559) who was a canon of Windsor. (Fasti; Foster; Emden)

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Goldwell

(1500 - 1585)

Bishop of St Asaph (1555 - 1558) (DNB )

Thomas Goldwell wrote a letter to Richard Thornton, suffragan of Dover, from Brussels on 16 June 1554. 1570, p. 1848, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, p. 1669.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

Thomas Goldwell fled England after the death of Mary. 1583, p. 2102.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Raynoldes

(1505? - 1559)

Dean of Exeter (1554 - 1559). Bishop-elect of Hereford when Mary died. He never obtained possession. (Foster)

Raynoldes and Blackstone, chancellor of Exeter, persecuted Agnes Prest. 1583, p. 2148.

Thomas Raynoldes died in prison. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Thirlby

(1506? - 1570) (DNB)

Bishop of Westminster (1540 - 1550). Bishop of Norwich (1550 - 1554). Bishop of Ely (1554 - 1559). [Fasti; DNB]

Thomas Thirlby was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Thomas Thirlby was present at Gardiner's sermon, 30 September 1554 (1570, p. 1644; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

He was one of the examiners of John Rogers on 22 January 1555. 1563, pp. 1023-26; 1570, pp. 1657-59; 1576, pp. 1414-15; 1583, pp. 1484-86.

He was one of the commissioners who condemned John Bradford, Laurence Saunders and Rowland Taylor to death (1570, p. 1699; 1576, p. 1450; 1583, pp. 1523-24).

He was sent as an ambassador to the pope on 19 February 1555. Foxe speculates that this embassy concerned the restoration of monastic lands. 1570, p. 1729; 1576, p. 1477; 1583, p. 1559.

A letter regarding Green's treason was sent to Bonner by the privy council on 11 November 1555 but not delivered until 17 November. It was signed by Winchester, Penbroke, Thomas Ely, William Haward, John Bourne, Thomas Wharton. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

Thirlby and Bonner came to Cranmer with a new commission on 14 February 1556. 1563, pp. 1489-92; 1570, pp. 2058-59, 1576, pp. 1775-76, 1583, pp. 1881-82.

Thirlby examined and condemned John Hullier. 1563, p. 1515, 1570, p. 2086, 1576, p. 1800, 1583, p. 1906.

John Hullier was examined and sent to Cambridge Castle by Thirlby. 1570, p. 2196, 1576, p. 1895, 1583, p. 2004.

Thirlby was imprisoned in the Tower after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1993, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Watson

(1513 - 1584)

Chancellor of Cambridge University (from 25 September 1553); Master of St. John's (Cambridge) (from 28 September 1553); Dean of Durham (from 18 November 1553); Bishop of Lincoln (1557 - 1559) (DNB)

In the 1553 Convocation, Thomas Watson engaged in a long debate with James Haddon on the meaning of a passage in Theodoret, regarding the Eucharist (John Philpot, The trew report of the dysputacyon had and begonne in the convocacyon hows at London the XVIII day of Octobre MDLIIII, [Emden, 1554], STC 19890, sigs. C8v - D14; 1563, p. 912; 1570, p. 1576; 1576, p. 1344; 1583, p. 1414; also see Rerum, p. 227. Philpot's account, reprinted by Foxe, abridges this argument. It is given in BL Harley 422, fols. 38r - 40r, which was not printed by Foxe, but is printed in R. W. Dixon, A History of the Church of England (6 vols, London, (1884 - 1902), IV, pp. 81 - 85).

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Watson, supported by Henry Morgan and John Harpsfield, debated with Richard Cheney on the Real Presence on the fifth day of the 1553 Convocation (1563, pp. 912-17; 1570, pp. 1576-1576 [recte 1577]; 1576, pp. 1344-45; and 1583, pp. 1415-16).

Watson was one of the official disputants in the Oxford disputations of 1554 (1563, pp. 932, 936-38, 973-76; 1570, pp. 1591-93 and 1618-21; 1576, p. 1358-59 and 1381-83; 1583, pp. 1428-30 and 1451-54).

[NB: A brief account of the Oxford disputations of 1554 mentions Watson's debating with Ridley (1563, p. 934; 1570, p. 1606; 1576, p. 1371; 1583, p. 1441).

In an attempt to reinstate catholicism at the University of Cambridge, a commission under the direction of Cardinal Pole ordered the condemning and burning of the bones and books of Phagius and Martin Bucer. Members of the commission were Cuthbert Scott, Nicholas Ormanet, Thomas Watson, John Christopherson and Henry Cole. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570]

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On 20 August 1553, Watson preached a sermon at Paul's Cross where, to protect him from a potentially hostile crowd, he was guarded by two hundred soldiers (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

Thomas Watson was chosen by Pole to be a persecutor of the University of Cambridge. 1563, p. 1537, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

Watson was sent to examine certain scholars at St John's College, Cambridge, on 9 January 1557. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2143, 1576, p. 1863, 1583, p. 1956.

He gave answer to an oration made by a fellow of Cambridge. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2143, 1576, p. 1863, 1583, p. 1956.

He thanked the fellows of Trinity College for their oration at the arrival of the commissioners. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2143, 1576, p. 1863, 1583, p. 1956.

The reformation of the University of Cambridge commanded by the queen's commissioners in 1557 was to take place at Watson's discretion. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1958.

Scot, Watson and Christopherson discussed and agreed to the exhumation of Bucer and Phagius. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1958.

Watson preached a sermon on Candlemas day. 1570, p. 2150, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1963.

Watson was present at the examination of John Rough and denounced him as a heretic. 1570, p. 2227, 1576, p. 1923, 1583, p. 2030.

Thomas Rose was imprisoned in the bishop of Lincoln's house in Holborn. 1576, p. 1978, 1583, p. 2083.

Watson was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

Watson was imprisoned in the Tower after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1993, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Wood

Bishop-elect of St Asaph. Never obtained possession.

Thomas Wood was imprisoned in the Marshalsea after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2102.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Chedsey

(1510 - 1574?)

Of Somersetshire. Chaplain to Bishop Bonner. Archdeacon of Middlesex (1554 - 1559). President of Corpus Christi College, Oxford (1558 - 1559). [DNB; Fasti; Foster]

After the death of Edward VI Chedsey recanted and mutated his doctrine to his own purpose, as in his dispute with Peter Martyr.

Chedsey preached at Paul's Cross on 27 August 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

He argued with John Philpot in defence of transubstantiation in the 1553 convocation (1563, pp. 910-11; 1570, pp. 1574-75; 1576, p. 1342-3; and 1583, pp. 1413-14).

He was one of the catholic disputants in the Oxford disputations of 1554. He debated with Cranmer on the morning of Monday 16 April (1563, pp. 932-33, 939-43, 946-48, 951 and 954-55; 1570, pp. 1594-96, 1599-1600, 1602 and 1604-5; 1576, pp 1360-62, 1364-65, 1367 and 1369-70; 1583, pp. 1430-32, 1435-1436, 1437 and 1439-40).

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When Chedsey addressed the lord mayor of London, he mentioned two letters- one from the queen and another from the privy council. The council letter was about procession and prayer at the agreement of peace between England and France. The signatories were: Francis Shrewsberye, Penbroke, Thomas Cheyny, William Peter, Thomas Wharton and Richard Southwell. Foxe suggests that he had seen the letter. 1563, p. 1217.

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He published a declaration at Paul's Cross in May 1555. 1563, p. , 1570, p. , 1576, p. , 1583, p. .

Chedsey tried to persuade Hooper to recant after his condemnation on 29 January 1555. He was unsuccessful but false rumors circulated that Hooper had recanted. 1563, p. 1057; 1570, p. 1680; 1576, p. 1434; 1583, p. 1507.

He witnessed Bishop Bonner's burning Thomas Tomkins' hand with a candle. 1570, p. 1710; 1576, p. 1460; 1583, p. 1534.

In late June 1554, Chedsey discussed vernacular services and the adoration of the cross with Thomas Hawkes. The next day Chedsey preached in Bonner's chapel, extolling the saving power of the eucharist. 1563, pp. 1154-55; 1570, pp. 1763-64; 1576, p. 1506; 1583, p. 1589

Philpot's sixth examination was before the Lord Chamberlain to Queen Mary, Ferrars, Lord Rich, Lord St John, Lord Windsor, Lord Shandoys, Sir John Bridges, Chadsey and Bonner. 1563, pp. 1405-12, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

Philpot's seventh examination on 19 November 1555 was before Bonner, Rochester, chancellor of Lichfield, Chadsey and John Dee. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1702-05, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

During Philpot's ninth examination, Bonner called for John Harpsfield, who attended the session, to examine Philpot and Chadsey, who had however left for Westminster. 1563, pp. 1420-24, 1570, pp. 1983-85, 1576, pp. 1707-09, 1583, pp. 1815-16.

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

Philpot spoke with Worcester, Wright and Chadsey later the same day as his twelfth examination. 1570, pp. 1993-94, 1576, p. 1717, 1583, pp. 1823-24.

Later on the day of his thirteenth examination, Philpot spoke with John Harpsfield, Bonner and Chadsey. 1570, pp. 1996-97, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, pp. 1823-24.

The last examination of Philpot was on 16 December 1555 before Bonner and other bishops, including York, Chichester, Bath, John Harpsfield, Chadsey, Bonner, into which entered William Garret, knight, the lord mayor and the sheriff (Thomas Leigh) of London and Sir Martin Bowes, knight. 1563, p. 1441, 1570, pp. 1997-98, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1827.

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Chedsey testified in the presence of Master Moseley and the lieutenant of the Tower that Bartlett Green had denied transubstantiation. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

A declaration was made at Paul's Cross by William Chedsey at Bonner's commandment. 1563, p. 1217.

Benold was examined before Chedsey, John Kingston, John Boswell, the two bailiffs of Colchester (Robert Brown and Robert Mainard) and several others on 23 June 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

Elizabeth Folkes was examined before Chedsey, John Kingston, John Boswell, the two bailiffs of Colchester (Robert Brown and Robert Mainard) and several others on 23 June 1557. Chedsey wept when the sentence of condemnation was read against her. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

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When Alexander Wimshurst arrived at St Paul's, he saw Chedsey, his old acquaintance at Oxford, and said to him that he would rather be examined by Martin than by anyone else. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

William Wood was examined by Chedsey, Kenall and Robinson on 19 October 1554 in St Nicholas's church, Rochester. 1570, p. 2281, 1576, pp. 1969-70, 1583, p. 2077.

Chedsey was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

He sent a letter to Bonner dated 21 April 1558 [BL, Ms. Harley 416, fos.74r-v. Foxe describes the letter on 1570, p. 2301 et seq.]

[Foxe frequently refers to him as 'Chadsey'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Copinger

Monk of Westminster. Fellow of New College, Oxford (1541).

Copinger bore the great seal before Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1990. 1583, p. 2101.

After the death of Gardiner Copinger became a monk in Westminster. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1990. 1583, p. 2101.

He went mad and died in the Tower after the death of Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1990. 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Maldon

Haberdasher and grocer. Of Chelmsford, Essex, Greenwich, Walthamstow and Newington.

William Maldon was scourged during Henry VIII's reign. 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2083.

Early in Elizabeth's reign William Maldon was bound to Hugh Aparry, wheat-taker for the queen, dwelling at Greenwich. 1570, p. 2302, 1576, p. 1993, 1583, p. 2102.

Maldon found a primer to read in English. 1570, p. 2302, 1576, p. 1993, 1583, p. 2102.

John Apowel mocked Maldon for reading the primer but then suddenly became afraid and asked for God's mercy. Apowel continually cried out that he saw the devil for around six days and so was sent to Bedlam. 1570, p. 2302, 1576, p. 1993, 1583, pp. 2102-03.

Maldon moved to Walthamstow, where his wife taught young children to read, in around 1563. One of these children was Dennis Benfield (girl), aged 12. She spoke blasphemy to other children. 1570, p. 2302, 1576, p. 1993, 1583, p. 2103.

William Maldon told his wife to correct Dennis Benfield for her blasphemy but, on the day, the girl's mother made her go to market in London instead. She was stricken down with an illness that made her side go back and caused her to become speechless. She died shortly afterward. Witnesses to this story were William Maldon and his wife, as well as the girl's mother and father. 1570, p. 2302, 1576, p. 1993, 1583, p. 2103.

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[Foxe alludes to Maldon's having been beaten in Henry VIII's reign. A full account appears in J. G. Nichols, Narratives of the Days of the Reformation, p. 348.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Greenwich [Grenwich]
NGR: TQ 388 775

Market Town and parish in the hundred of Blackheath, Lathe of Sutton-at-Hone, County of Kent. 6 miles east-south-east of London. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Rochester. A royal residence was established here by Edward I, and was in use throughout the Tudor period. The palace having become decayed was demolished by Charles II, who intended to replace it.

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Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

The reason for the use of this work of reference is that it presents the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take this reference as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Windsor
NGR: SU 967 768

A borough, market town and parish having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Ripplesmere, county of Berkshire. 20 mile east by north from Reading, 22.5 miles west by south from London. The castle, built by Henry I, occupies more than 12 acres of ground, comprising upper, lower and middle wards. A principal royal residence in Tudor times. The living [of the town] is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Berkshire, Diocese of Salisbury.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2126 [2102]

Q. Mary. Gods punishment vpon persecutors and contemners of the Gospell.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.Now after the Queene immediately followed, or rather waighted vpon her, the death of Cardinal Poole, who the next day departed: Of what disease, although it be vncertaine to many, yet to some it is suspected that hee tooke some Italian Physicke, which did him no good. Then followed in order. MarginaliaByshops that dyed after Q. Mary.

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Bishops.
 
 
 
 
Iohn Christopherson B. of Chichester.
Hopton B. of Norwich.
Morgan B. of S. Dauids.
Iohn White B. of Winchester.
Rafe Baine B. of Lichfield and Couentrie.
Owen Oglethorpe B. of Carlile.
* Marginalia* Note that B. Tonstall in Q. Maryes tyme was no great bloudy persecutour.
For Maister Russell a Preacher was before him, and D. Hinmer his Chauncellour would haue had him examined more particularly.
The Bishop stayed him, saying: hetherto we haue had a good report among our neighbours: I pray you bring not this mans bloud vpon my head.
Cutbert Tonstall B. of Durham.
Thomas Rainolds elect of Herford, after hys
depriuation died in prison.

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Besides these Bishops aboue named, first died at the same time.
D. Weston Deane
of Westminster, afterwarde Deane of Windsore, chiefe disputer against Cranmer, Rid-
ley, and Latimer.
M. Slethurst, maister of Trinitie colledge in Oxforde,
who died in the Tower.
Seth Holland deane of Worcester, and Warden of Al-
soule Colledge in Oxforde.
William Copinger, Monke of Westminster, who bare
the great Seale before Steuen Gardener, after the
death of the sayde Gardener, made him selfe Monke
in the house of Westminster, and shortly after, so fell
madde, and died in the Tower.
Doctor Steward Deane of Winchester.

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MarginaliaA note of D. Weston.¶ To beholde the woorking of Gods iudgements, it is wonderous. In the first yeare of Quene Marie, when the Clergy was assembled in the Conuocation house, and also afterwarde, when the Disputation was in Oxford against Doctor Cranmer, Ridley, and Latimer, he that had seene then Doctor Weston the Prolocutoure in his ruffe, howe highly he tooke vpon him in the Schooles, and how stoutly he stoode in the Popes quarell against simple and naked truth, full litle would haue thought, and lesse did he thinke him self (I dare say) that his glory and lofty lookes shoulde haue bene brought downe so soone, especiallye by them of hys owne Religion, whose part he so doughtely defended. But such is the rewarde and ende commonly of them, who presumptuouslye oppose them selues to striue against the Lord, as by the example of this Doctorly prolocutor right wel may appeare. For not long after the disputation aboue mentioned, against Bishop Cranmer and hys fellowes, MarginaliaD. Weston out of fauour with the Papists.God so wrought against the sayd Doctour Weston, that hee fell in great displeasure wyth Cardinall Poole and other Bishops, because hee was vnwilling to geue vp his Deanery and house of Westminster, vnto the Monkes and religious men, whom in deede he fauoured not, although in other things he maintained the Churche of Rome. Who notwithstanding, at last through importunate sute gaue vp Westminster, & was deane of Windsore: Where not long after, MarginaliaD. Weston taken in adultry.he was apprehended in adulterie, and for the same, was by the Cardinall put from all hys spirituall liuings.

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MarginaliaD. Weston appealed to Rome.Wherefore he appealed to Rome, and purposed to haue fledde out of the Realme, but was taken by the way, and committed to the Tower of London, and there remained vntill Queene Elizabeth was proclaimed Queene, at whych time he being deliuered, fell sicke and dyed. MarginaliaThe death of Doctour Weston.The common talke was, that if he had not so sodēly ended his life, hee woulde haue opened and reuealed the purpose of the chiefe of the Cleargy, meaning the Cardinall, whyche was to haue taken vp K. Henries body at Windsore, and to haue burned it. And thus much of doctor Weston.

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The residue that remained of the persecuting Clergy, and escaped the stroke of deathe, were depriued, and committed to prisones: the Catalogue of whose names heere followeth. MarginaliaCatholicke Bishops after Q. Maryes death depriued & imprisoned.

 
 
 
 
In the To-
wer.
 
 
 
 
Nicholas Heath, Archbishop of Yorke, and
Lord Chauncellour.
Thomas Thurlby B. of Ely.
Thomas Watson B. of Lincolne.
Gilbert Burne B. of Bath and Welles.
Richard Pates B. of Worcester.
Troublefield B. of Exetor.
Iohn Fecknam Abbot of Westminster.
Iohn Boxal Deane of Windsore and Peter-
borough.

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Of Dauid Poole B. of Peterborough, I doubte whe-

ther he was in the Tower, or in some other prisone. MarginaliaNote that some of these Bishops afterward through the goodnes of Q. Elizabeth were dispersed and suffered to be kept in their friendes houses.

 
Ran away.
Goldwell B. of S. Asse.
Maurice Elect of Bangor.

Edmunde Boner B. of London, in the Marshalsea.
Thomas Wood B. Elect, in the Marshalsea.
Cutbert Scot bish. of Chester, was in the Fleete, from
whence he escaped to Louane, and there died.

 
 
 
In the Fleet.
 
 
 
Henry Cole Deane of Paules.
Iohn Harpesfield Archdeacon of London,
and Deane of Norwich.
Nicholas Harpesfield Archd. of Cant.
Anthony Draycot Archdeacon of Hūting-
ton.
W. Chadsey Archdeacon of Midlesex.

MarginaliaA note of Doct. Chadsey. 34. Articles of D. Chadsey. MarginaliaD. Chadsey subscribed to the reformed religion in King Edwardes time.¶ Concerning which Doctour Chadsey here is to be noted, that in the beginning of king Edwards raigne he recanted and subscribed to 34. Articles, wherein hee then fully consented and agreed with his owne hand wryting to the whole forme of doctrine approoued & allowed then in the church, as well concerning iustification by faith only, as also the doctrine of the two sacramentes then receaued, denying as well the Popes supremacie, transubstantiation, Purgatory, Inuocation of Saints, eleuation and adoration of the Sacrament, the sacrifice, & veneration of the Masse, as also all other like excrements of Popish superstition, according to the kings booke then set foorth.

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Wherefore the more maruel it is, that he being counted such a famous and learned Clearke, would shew himselfe so fickle and vnstable in hys assertions, so double in hys doinges, to alter hys Religion according to time, and to maintein for truth, not what he thought best, but what he myght most safely defend. So long as the state of the lord Protectour and of hys brother stoode vprighte, what was then the conformitie of this D. Chadsey, hys owne Articles in Latine, wrytten and subscribed wyth hys owne hand, doe declare, which I haue to shewe, if he will denye them. MarginaliaD. Chadsey mutable and inconstant in his religion.But after the decay of the kings vncles, the fortune of them turned not so fast, but his Religion turned withall, and eftsoones he tooke vppon hym to dispute agaynste Peter Martyr, in vpholding Transubstantiation at Oxforde, which a little before with his owne hād wryting he had ouerthrowen.

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MarginaliaThe egernes of D. Chadsey in punishing the poore Martyrs.After this ensued the time of Queene Mary, wherein doctor Chadsey to shew hys double diligence, was so eger in his commission to sit in iudgement, & to bring poore mē to their death, that in the last yeare of Quene Mary when the Lord Chauncellor, Syr Thomas Cornwalles, Lorde Clinton, & diuers other of the Counsell had sent for hym by a special letter to repaire vnto London out of Essex, he wryting againe to the bishop of London, sought meanes not to come at the Counsels bidding, but to continue still in his persecuting progresse. The Copie of whose letter I haue also in my handes (if neede were) to bring foorth. 

Commentary  *  Close

This letter survives among Foxe's papers as BL, Harley MS 416, fo. 74r-v.

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MarginaliaWil. Mauldon Prentise with M. Hugh Apparry at Grenewich.Mention was made not long before, of one William Mauldon,  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Addenda: ref page 638, bottom

Foxe has not hitherto mentioned William Maldon at all; but he evidently had intended introducing an account, drawn up by Maldon himself, of his treatment by his own father in the time of Henry VIII. for the Gospel's sake.

who in king Henries time suffered stripes and scourgings for confessing the veritie of Gods true religion. 
Commentary  *  Close

Maldon's account of his beating survives among Foxe's papers as BL, Harley MS 425, fo. 77r. Obviously Foxe believed that he had printed it, but it was inadvertantly omitted and is not in the Acts and Monuments.

It happened in the first yeare of Queene Elizabeth, that the sayd W. Mauldon was bound seruaunt with one named Maister Hugh Aparry then a Wheat taker for the Quene, dwelling at Grenewich. Who being newly come vnto him, and hauing neuer a booke there to looke vpon, being desirous to occupie himselfe vertuously, loked about the house, and founde a Primer in English, whereon hee read in a winters euening. Whiles he was reading, there sat one Iohn Apowel that had ben a Seruing man, about 30. yeres of age, borne toward Wales, whom the said M. Hugh gaue meat and drinke vnto, til such time as he could get a seruice. And as the foresayd William Mauldon read on the Booke, the sayde Iohn Apowell mocked hym after euery worde, with contrary gaudes and flouting wordes vnreuerently, in so muche that he coulde no longer abide him for grief of hart, but turned vnto him, and sayd: Iohn take heede what thou doest: Thou doest not mocke mee, but thou mockest God. For in mocking of his word, thou mockest hym: and thys is the word of God, though I be simple that read it: and therfore beware what thou doest.

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Then Mauldon fell to reading agayne, and still hee proceeded on in hys mocking, and when Mauldon had redde certayne Englyshe Prayers, in the ende he redde, Lorde haue mercye vppon vs, Christe haue mercye vpon vs. &c.

And as Mauldon was reciting these wordes, the other with a start sodenly sayd: Lord haue mercy vpon me.

With that Mauldon tourned and sayde, what ailest

thou
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