Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt References
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Christopher Lansdale

Lansdale was married to a very old woman and committed adultery with a younger woman who bore him two children who lived with him. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2103.

Foxe describes his character. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2103.

A sick man lay down in a ditch on Lansdale's land and died because Lansdale would not offer him shelter. Lansdale left him to rot in the ditch. The stench was so bad that his neighbours offered to move the man to another ditch (the man had desired this before he died), and one went to Lansdale's wife for a bundle of straw to lay him on. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2104.

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Christopher Lansdale had promised Master Searles that he would assist the poor man in the ditch but did not in fact help him. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2104.

Lansdale fell from his horse into a ditch and died. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2104.

 
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Hannington

Fellow of New College, Oxford (1553) (Foster). Of Oxford.

Hannington drowned himself in a well at Rome or Padua. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2104.

He had a crucifix around his neck at the time of his death. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2104.

 
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John Martiall

(1534 - 1597)

Catholic controversialist. (DNB)

John Martiall wrote The Book of the Cross. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2104.

Two of his students, Hanington and Plankney, drowned themselves. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2104.

 
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John Plankney

(d. 1565)

Fellow of New College, Oxford (1560). Of Forest Hill, Oxford. (Foster)

John Plankney was scholar to Marshall, who wrote the Book of the Cross. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2104.

Plankney was said (mistakenly) to have drowned himself at Rewley in 1556. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2104.

He had a crucifix around his neck at the time of his death. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2104.

 
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Searles

Christopher Lansdale had promised Master Searles that he would assist the poor man in the ditch but did not in fact help him. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2104.

 
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Hackney
Hackney
NGR: TQ 355 855

A parish in the Tower division of the hundred of Ossulstone, county of Middlesex. 2 miles north-east from London, comprising three districts. Until 1825 Hackney consisted of one parish. It was then divided into three, called Hackney, South Hackney and West Hackney. Each is a distinct rectory, in the jurisdiction of the Commissary of London, concurrently with the Consistorial Court of the Bishop of London

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Stoke Newington
Newington Side, Newyngton Side
NGR: TQ 335 864

A parish in the Finsbury division of the hundred of Ossulstone, county of Middlesex. 3 miles north by east from London. The living is a rectory in the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, and in the patronage of the Prebendary of Newington in St. Paul's cathedral

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2128 [2104]

Quene Mary. Gods punishment vpon persecutors, and contemners of the Gospell.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.anguish and grief of conscience for the same, was so bereft of his wits, MarginaliaRobert Edgor bereft of his wittes. that he was kept in chaines and bondes many yeares after, pag. 1917.

MarginaliaTwo Papistes of new Colledge in Oxford drowned themselues.As touching Iohn Plankney fellow of new Colledge in Oxford, Ciuilian, and one Hanington, both fellowes of the same house aforesaid, and both stubburne Papistes, the matter is not much worthy the memory: yet the example is not vnworthy to be noted, to see what little cōfort & grace commonly followeth the comfortlesse doctrine and profession of papistry, as in these two yong men, amongst many other may well appeare. Of whome the one, which was Plankney, scholer somtyme to Marshal (who wrote the booke of the crosse) is commonly reported and known to them of that Vniuersitie, to haue drowned himselfe in the riuer about Ruly, at Oxford.  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 642, middle

The site of a royal abbey, occupying the northern part of the Island of Oseney, founded in 1279 by Edmund, Earl of Cornwall. Ingram's Memorials of Oxford, vol. iii. p. 11.

anno. 1566. the other in a Well about Rome, or as some do say, at Padua, and so beyng both drowned, were both taken vp with Crucifixes as it is sayde of some, hangyng about their neckes: The more pitie that such young studentes did so much addicte their wittes, rather to take the way of papistrie, then to walke in the comfortable light of the Gospell, nowe so brightly spreading his beames in all the worlde, which if they had done, I thinke not contrary, but it had prooued much better with them.

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MarginaliaA story of a Courtyer one of the Garde, which happened. An. 1568.Albeit (I trust) the Gospell of Christ beyng now receiued in the Queenes Court amongst the Courtiers and seruaunts of her Gard, hath framed their lyues and maners so to lyue in the due feare of God, and temperance of lyfe, with all sobrietie and mercifull compassion towarde their euenchristen, that they neede not greatly any other instructions to be geuē them in this story: yet for so much as examples many tymes doe worke more effectually in the myndes and memories of men: & also partly considering wt my selfe, how these, aboue all other sorts of men in the whole Realme, in tyme past haue euer had most neede of such wholesom lessons and admonitions, MarginaliaAdmonition to Courtiers.to leaue their vnordinate riote of quaffing and drinking, and their Heathenish prophanatie of lyfe: I thought here to set before their eyes a terrible example, not of a strange and forreine person, but of one of their owne coate, a Yeoman of the Gard, not fayned by me, but brought to me by Gods prouidence for a warnyng to all Courtiers, and done of very truth no longer ago then in the yeare of our Lord, 1568. And as the story is true, so is the name of the partie not vnknowen, beyng called Christopher Landesdale, dwellyng in Hackney in Middlesex. The order of whose lyfe, and maner of his death beyng worthy to be noted, is this as in story here vnder followeth.

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MarginaliaAn example of Christopher Landesdale, one of the Garde, for all Courtyers to looke vpon.This foresayd Landesdale beyng maried to an auncient women yet liuing, hauing by her both goods & lands, notwithstandyng liued long in filthy whoredome with a yonger woman, by whom he had two children, a sonne & a daughter, and kept them in his house vnto the day of his death. Also when he should haue bene in seruing of God on the Saboth day, hee vsed to walke or ride about hys fieldes, and seldome hee or any of his house came to the Church after the English seruice was againe receyued. Besides this, he was a great swearer, and a great drunkard, and had great delight also in makyng other menne drunken, and would haue them whom he had made drūkards, to call him father, and he would cal thē his sonnes: and of these sonnes by report, he had aboue fortie. And if he had seene one that would drinke freely, hee would marke hym, and spende his money with him liberally in ale, or wyne, but most in wyne, to make him the sooner drunken. These blessed sonnes of his should haue great chere oftentymes, both at his owne house and at Tauernes: and not long before his death he was so beastly drunken in a Tauerne ouer against his dore, that he fell downe in the Tauerne yard, and could not arise alone, but lay grouelyng, till he was holpen vp and so caried home.

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MarginaliaLandesdale a feaster of the rich, and vnmercifull to the poore.This father of drunkards, as he was a great feaster of the rich and welthy of Hackney and others, so hys poore neighbours and poore tenauntes fared little the better for hym: except it were with some broken meate, which after his feastes, his wyfe would cary and send vnto them, or some almes geuen at his doore.

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Besides all this, he did much iniury to his poore neighbours in oppressing the commons nere about hym, which was a speciall reliefe vnto them, so that his cattaile eat vp all without pitie or mercy.

MarginaliaPoore Lazarus lying by the rich mans doore.There chaunced after this about two yeres before hee died, a poore man, beyng sicke of the bloudy flixe, for very weakenes to lie downe in a ditch of the sayd Landsdales, not a stones cast from his house, where he had a litle straw brought him. Notwithstanding, the said Landesdale had backe houses and Barnes enough to haue layed hym in, but would not shew hym so much pitie. And thus poore

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Lazarus there lay night and day, about sixe weekes ere he died.

Certaine good neighbours hearyng of this, procured things necessary for his reliefe, but he was so farre spente, that he could not bee recouered: who lay broyling in the hote sunne, with a horible smell, most pitifull to behold.

MarginaliaYet the riche glutton was better, for he suffered Lazarus to lye at his gates.This poore man a little before he died, desired to be remooued to another ditch into the shadowe. Whereuppon, one of the neighbours commyng to Landesdales wyfe for a bundle of strawe for him to lye vppon, shee required to haue hym remooued to Newyngton side, because (she said) if he should dye, it would be very farre to cary him to the Church.

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Besides this, there was a mariage in this Landsdales house, and the gestes that came to the mariage, gaue the poore man mony as they came & went by him, but Landesdale disdained to contribute any relief vnto him, notwithstanding that he had promised to M. Searles, one of the Queenes Gard (who had more pitie of him) to minister to him things necessary.

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MarginaliaThe death of poore Lazarus in the ditch.To be short, the next day poore Lazarus departed this lyfe, & was buried in Hackney churchyard: Vpon whom Landsdale did not so much as bestow a winding sheet, or any thyng els towards his buriall. And thus much cōcerning the end of poore Lazarus. Nowe let vs heare what became of the rich glutton.

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About two yeres after this, the said Landesdale beyng full of drinke (as his custome was) came ridyng in great hast from London on s. Andrews day in the euening, an. 1568. and as it is reported by those that sawe him reelyng too and fro lyke a drunkard with his hat in hys hand, and commyng by a ditch, there tumbled in headlong into the ditch. Some say that the horse fell vppon him, but that is not lyke. This is true, the horse more sober then the maister, came home leauyng his maister behynde him. MarginaliaThe end of this vnmercifull Epicure in the ditch.Whether he brake his necke with the fall, or was drowned (for the water was scarsly a foote deepe) it is vncertayne: but certaine it is, that he was there found dead. Thus he beyng found dead in the ditch, the Crowner (as the manner is) sate vpon him: and how the matter was handled for sauyng his goods, the Lord knoweth: but in the end so it fell out, that the goods were saued, and the poore horse indited for his maisters death.

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The neighbours hearing of the death of this man, and considering the maner thereof, said, it was iustly fallen vpon him, that as he suffered the poore man to lie and dye in the ditch nere vnto hym, so his end was to die in a ditch likewise. And thus hast thou in this story (Christian brother and Reader) MarginaliaThe image of the rich glutton and poore Lazarus.the true image of a rich glutton & poore Lazarus set out before thine eyes, whereby we haue all to learne, what happeneth in the ende to such voluptuous Epicures and Atheistes, which beyng voyde of all senses of Religion and feare of God, yelde themselues ouer to all prophanitie of lyfe, neither regardyng any honestie at home, nor shewyng any mercy to their needye neighbour abroad.

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Christ our Sauiour saith: MarginaliaMath. 5.Blessed be the mercifull, for they shall obtaine mercy: but iudgement without mercy shal be excuted on them which haue shewed no mercy, &c. And S. Iohn sayth: Marginalia1. Iohn. 3.He that seeth his brother to haue neede, and shutteth vp his compassion from him, how dwelleth the loue of God in hym? &c. Agayne, Esay against such prophane drunkards and quaffers, thus crieth out: Wo be vnto them that rise vp early to follow drunkennesse, and to them that so continue vntill night, till they bee set on fire with wyne. In those companies are Harpes and Lutes, Tabrets and Pipes, and wine: but they regard not the workes of the Lord, and consider not the operation of his hands, &c. Woe be vnto them that are strong to spue out wyne, and expert to set vp dronkennese.

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The punishments of them that be dead, be wholsome documents to men that be aliue. And therfore as the story aboue exemplified may serue to warne all Courtiers and Yeomen of the Gard: so by this that followeth, MarginaliaA warning to gentlemen.I would wish all gentlemen to take good heed and admonition betime, to leaue their outrageous swering and blaspheming of the Lord their God.

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MarginaliaA fearefull example of Gods punishment vpō a gentleman a greate swearer, in Cornewall.In the tyme and raigne of K. Edward, there was in Cornewall a certaine lusty yong Gentleman, which dyd ride in company with other mo Gentlemē, together with their seruaunts, beyng about the number of xx. horsemen. Amongst whom this lusty yonker entring into talke, began to sweare, most horribly blasphemyng the name of God, with other ribauldry words besides. Vnto whome one of the company (who is yet aliue, and witnes hereof) not able to abide the hearing of such blasphemous abhominatiō, in gentle wordes speaking to him, said, he should

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geue
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