Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt References
 
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Bartholomew Cassaneus (or Chassaneus) (i.e. Barthelemy de Chassenée)

Noted jurist and premier président at the parlement of Aix-en-Provence, France.

Foxe recalls the role of de Chassenée in the prosecution of Waldensians in that province, following the activities of the notorious Inquisitor Jean de Roma in 1533. It was under de Chassenée's presidency that the parlement of Aix issued the first collective death sentence for heresy against all the inhabitants of a village - the notorious arrêt de Mérindol. De Chassenée had earlier published a treatise on the trial and punishment of insects. Foxe refers to him in 1570, p. 2307, 1576, p. 1997, 1583, p. 2107.

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Johannes de Roma

Inquisitor in Provence, noted for his zealous pursuit of the Waldensians (Vaudois) there and in Angrona.

Foxe describes Johannes de Roma as a 'hell-hound' and refers to his activities in all the editions from 1570 (1570, p. 2308-10, 1576, p. 1998-2000, 1583, p. 2108-09). Modern scholarship has largely substantiated the evidence of his dubious methods for eliciting evidence (see G. Audisio, Le barbe et l'inquisiteur (Aix-en-Provence: 1979).

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John Eckius (i.e. Johann Eck)

(1486 - 1543)

German catholic theologian, the most influential and authoritative opponent of Martin Luther. Luther refers to him in 1570, p. 2307, 1576, p. 1997, 1583, p. 2107. The death of Eck is referred to in John Carion's Chronicles and referred to by Foxe in 1570, p. 2307, 1576, p. 1997, 1583, p. 2107.

2131 [2107]

Queene Mary. Gods punishment vpon persecutors and contemners of the Gospell.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.rator of the Councell of Trident, ann. 1552. The story of whom is certain, the thing that hapned to him was strāge and notable, the exāple of him may be profitable to others such as haue grace to be warned by other mēs euils. The narration is this.

MarginaliaThe terrible iudgement of God vpon Cardinall Crescentius, president of the Counsell of Trident. An. 1552.The 25. day of March, in the yere aforesaid, Crescentius the Popes Legate, and Vicegerent in the Councell of Trident, was sitting all the day long vntill darke night, in writing letters to the Pope. After his labour when night was come, thinking to refresh himselfe, he began to rise: and at his rising, beholde there appeared to hym a mighty blacke dogge, of a huge bignes, his eyes flamyng with fire, and his eares hanging low downe welneere to the ground, to enter in, and straite to come toward hym, & so to couch vnder the boord. The Cardinall not a little amased at the sight thereof, somewhat recouering himselfe, called to his seruauntes, which were in the outward chāber next by, to bring in a candle, and to seeke for the dog. But when the dog could not be found, neither there, nor in no other chamber about, the Cardinall thereupon striken with a sodaine conceit of mynd, immediately fell into such a sicknes, wherof his Phisitions which he had about hym, with all their industry and cunnyng coulde not cure hym. MarginaliaThe wretched end of Cardinall Crescentius President of the Counsell of Trent.And so in the towne of Verona died this popish cardinall, the Popes holy Legate, and President of this coūcel: wherein his purpose was (as Sleidane saith) to recouer and heale againe the whole authoritie and doctrine of the Romish see, and to set it vp for euer.

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There were in this Councell beside the Popes Legates and Cardinall of Trident, lxij. Bishops, Doctours of Diuinitie xlij. And thus was the ende of that Popishe Councell, by the prouident hand of the almighty, dispatched and brought to naught. Ex Sleidano, Li. 23.

This Councell of Trident being then dissolued by the death of this Cardinal, was afterward notwithstanding recollected againe about the yeare of our lord, 1562. against the erroneous proceedings of which Councel, other writers there be that say enough. So much as pertaineth only to story, MarginaliaTwo aduouterous Byshops of Trident Counsell, iustly slaine in adultery.I thought hereunto to adde concernyng two filthy adulterous bishops, to the sayd Councel belonging of whome the one haunting to an honest mans wife, was slaine by the iust stroke of God with a Borespeare. The other Bishop, whose haunte was to creepe through a window, in the same window was subtilly taken and hanged in a grinne layed for hym of purpose, and so conueied, that in the mornyng hee was seene openly in the street hangyng out of the windowe, to the wonderment of all that passed by. Ex protestatione Concionatorum Germa. aduersus conuentum Trident. &c.

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MarginaliaD. Eckius the Popes stout Champion.Amongst all the religious order of Papists, who was a stouter defender of the Popes side, or a more vehement impugner of Martin Luther, then Iohn Eckius,  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 651, middle

The champion's Enchiridion was regarded as a most potent weapon by the anti-Catholics of Reformation times. Bale, under the name of Harryson, writes:-
"The Enchyridion of Eckius that impudent proctour of Antichrist offendeth yow nothynge at all:" [he is alluding to some of Bonner's literary prohibitions] "Everye where ys thys boke sought and enquyred for in cyte, markett and feyer. Everye ser Johan must have yt that can rede, to make hym therwith a Christen curate, a good ghostlye father, and a catholyck member of holye churche. Verye few Popyshe Prestes within my lordes dyocese are at thys same houre without yt, eyther in ther chambers, sleves or bosoms [The Edit. Antverpiæ, 1547, is a neat pocket volume]. For yt ys a most precyouse treasure to hym that wyll heare confessyons and kepe a cure well to Antichristes behove. That embrase the gentyll menne of the Popes lyverye and marke, that culle they, that kysse they, that drawe they to them as a worke of most holye wholsom catholyck doctrine. No lesse myght Harrye Pepwell in Paules churche yearde have out of Michael Hillenius' howse, in Anwerpe, at one tyme than a whole complete prynte ["Prynte," used thrice in this extreact for "edition" or "impression," illustrates Cranmer's meaning] at the holye request of Stokyslaye [Panzer, Annall. Typogr. vii. 252]. In a short space were they dyspached, and a newe prynte in hande, soche tyme as he also commaunded Barlowes dyaloges ["A dialogue describing the original ground of these Lutheran faccions," &c. supposed to be reprinted by Cawood in 1553. See Wood's Athenæ Oxon. i. 365; Dibdin's Ames, iv. 389] to be preached of the curates through out all hys dyocese. I know yt the better, for that he at the same tyme suspended me from preachynge in Estsexe, bycause I wold not leave the gospell and be sworne to the observacyon of hys injunccyons. I have knowne in my tyme more than vi dyverse pryntes of thys erronyouse and devylyshe boke, whych ys a manyfest token that the utteraunce therof hath not bene small." (Yet a course at the Romyshe Foxe, Zurick, 1543, fol. 54, 55.)

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who, if his cause wherein he so trauailed, had bene godly, had deserued (no doubt) great fauour and condigne retribution at the hands of the Lord. Now for so much as we cannot better iudge of him then by his ende, let vs consider the maner of his departing hence, and compare the same with the end of M. Luther.

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MarginaliaThe end of Martyn Luther compared to the end of Eckius.In the which M. Luther beyng such an aduersarye as he was to the Pope, and hauyng no lesse then al the world vpon him at once, first this is to bee noted, that after all these trauailes, the Lord gaue him to depart both in great age, and in his owne natiue countrey where he was born. Secondly, he blessed him with such a quiet death, without any violent hande of any aduersary, that it was counted rather a sleepe then a death. Thirdly, as the death of hys body was myld, so his spirit & mynde continued no lesse godly vnto the end, continually inuocating and calling vpon the name of the Lord, and so commending his spirite to hym with feruent prayer, he made a blessed and an heauenly ending. Fourthly, ouer and besides these blessings, almighty God did also adde vnto him such an honourable buriall, as to many great Princes vnneth happeneth the like. And this briefly concernyng the ende of M. Luther, as ye may read before more at large, pag. 863.

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MarginaliaThe maner of Iohn Eckius death.Now let vs consider and conferre with this the death of Iohn Eckius and the maner thereof, which we find in the English translation of the history of Iohn Carion, fol. 250.  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, 651, fn 3

Ex "Appendice Hist. Joan. Carionis; fol. 250;" rather the reverse of fol. 249. The Chronicles of John Carion were printed at Paris in 1543. The work from which Foxe quotes was printed in English at Nuremberg by John Funcke: it was dedicated to Edward the Sixth, and a copy of it is in the British Museum. See Gerhardt's Loci Theolog. loc. xxiii. cap. xi. vol. 12, p. 153, Ed. 1769. - ED. Appendix:Dibdin also, in his Typogr. Antiquities, vol. iv. p. 317, mentions "The thre bokes of Cronicles, whyche John carion gathered wyth great diligence of the best authors, &c.; printed (and apparently translated) by Walter Lynne, 4to. Lond. 1550. Carion's Works are purged in the Roman Expurgatory Index, Mr. Gibbings' reprint, Dublin, 1837.

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in these words expressed. This yere (saith he) died at Ingoldstate, Doctor Eckius a faithful seruant and champion of the Pope, and a defender of the abhominable Papacie. But as his lyfe was full of all vngodlines, vncleannes, and blasphemy, so was his end miserable, hard, and pitifull, in so much that his last wordes (as it is noted of many credible personnes) were these: MarginaliaEckius last wordes. MarginaliaEckius dyeth dreaming of his Guildens.In case the foure thousand guildens were ready, the matter were dispat-

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ched, &c. (Dreamyng belike of some Cardinalship that he should haue bought.) Some say, that the Pope had granted him a certaine Deanry, which he should haue redeemed from the Courte of Rome with the foresayd summe. Now what a heauenly ende this was of M. Eckius, I leaue it to the Readers iudgement. MarginaliaEx appendice Hist. Ioan. Carionis.

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MarginaliaGods iudgment vpon one Iohn Vander Warfe. Shoulted of Antwarpe, a persecutour.In the Citie of Andwerpe was (as they terme hym there) a Shoulted, that is to say, the next Officer to the Markgraue, one named Iohn Vander Warfe, a Bastard sonne of a stocke or kinred called Warfe, of good estimation amongest the chiefest in Antwarpe. Who, as he was of nature cruell, so was he of iudgement peruerse and corrupt, and a sore persecutor of Christes flocke, with greedines seekyng and sheddyng innocent bloud, and had drouned diuers good men and women in the water: for the which he was much commended of the bloudy generation. Of some he was called a bloudhound or bloudy dog. Of other he was called MarginaliaShilpad a kinde of Shelfishe fashioned like a Tode, with a hard and a broad shell vpon his backe.Shildpad: that is to say, Sheltode: for that hee beyng a short grundy and of little stature, did ride commonly with a great broad hat, as a churl of the countrey.

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This man after he was weary of his office (wherein he had continued aboue xx. yeres) he gaue it ouer: and because he was now growen rich and welthy, he entended to passe the residue of his lyfe in pleasure and quietnes.

MarginaliaOur Ladies druncken feast.During which tyme, about the second yeare after hee had left his office, he cameto Antwarpe to the feast called our Ladies Oumegang, to make mery: which feast is vsually kept on the Sonday followyng the assumption of our Lady. The same day in the after noone about foure of the clock he being wel loden with wine, rode homewards in his wagon, with his wife and a gentlewoman waiting on her and his foole. As soone as the Wagon was come without the gate of the citie called Croneborgh gate, vpon the wooden bridge beyng at that tyme made for a shifte, with railes or barres on both sides, for more safetie of the passengers (halfe a mans heighth & more) the horses stood still and would by no meanes go forward, whatsoeuer the guider of the wagon could do.

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Then he in a drunken rage cried out to him that guided the wagō, saying: Ride on in a thousand deuils uame, ride on. Wherat the poore man answered, that he could not make the horses to goe forward. By and by, whyle they were yet thus talking, sodenly rose, as it were, a mighty hurlewynd, with a terrible noyse (the wether beyng very faire & no wynd stirring before) & tost the wagon ouer the barre into the towne ditch, the ropes whereat the horses had bene tied, beyng broken a sunder in such sort, as if they had bene cut with a sharp knife, the wagon also being cast vpsidedowne, with the fore end thereof turned toward the towne agayne, and he drowned in the mire: and when he was taken vp, it was found, that his necke also was broken. His wife was taken vp aliue, but died also within three dayes after. But the Gentlewoman and the foole by Gods mighty prouidence, were preserued & had no harm. The foole hearing the people say, that his Maister was dead, sayd: & was not I dead, was not I dead too? This was done, an. 1553. MarginaliaFraunces Fraet the Printer and witnes hereof a good man & Martyr.Witnesse hereof not onely the Printer of the same story in Dutch dwelling then in Andwerpe, whose name was Fraunces Fraet a good man, and afterward for hatred put to death of Papistes, but also diuers Dutchmen here now in England, and a great number of English merchants, which then were at Antwerpe, & are yet alyue.

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MarginaliaBatholomeus Cassaneus plagued.Of the sodaine death of Bartholomeus Chassaneus, or Cassanus, persecutor, read before, pag. 943.

MarginaliaMinerius plagued of God.Of Minerius the bloudy persecutor, or rather tormētor of Christes saints, how he dyed with bleeding in hys lower partes, ye heard before, pag. 953.

MarginaliaA Iudge with 3. persecutours plagued by Gods iudgment.And what should I speake of the iudge which accompanied the sayd Minerius in his persecution, who a little after as he returned homeward, was drowned, and three mo of the same company, killed one another vpon a strife that fell amongst them, pag. 953.

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MarginaliaThe terrible vengeaunce of God vpon Iohn de Roma a terrible persecutor. Read before pag. 216.Ioannes de Roma cruell Monke, whom rather wee may call a hell hound, then persecutor, what hellishe tormentes hee hadde deuised for the poore Christians of Angrongne, the cōtents of the story before doth expresse, pag. 216. Agayne, with what like torments afterward, & that doublefold, the Lord payd him home agayne, who in hys rottyng and strinking death, neither could find any enemy to kill hym, nor any friend to bury him, who neither could abide his owne stinking carion, nor any man els to come

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