Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Antoine de Bourbon

(1518 - 1562)

Duc de Vendôme, king of Navarre

Foxe mentions his death at the head of the royal army besieging Rouen in the first civil war. He was wounded in the shoulder during the siege of the city and lived long enough to enter it through the breach that his army eventually made in the walls, before dying on 17 November 1562 (1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 2001, 1583, p. 2112). (DNB, 3, cols 35-7)

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Christopher Parker

Christopher Parker persecuted Richard Woodman. 1563, p. 1730, 1576, p. 2002, 1583, p. 2113.

Parker bound his own hands and cast himself into a pond and drowned at Herstonceaux, Sussex on 8 September 1575. 1563, p. 1730, 1576, p. 2002, 1583, p. 2113.

[Alias Parker the Wild.]

 
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François Olivier (Oliver)

(1497 - 1560)

Chancellor of France (1545-1555)

Foxe mentions that Olivier apparently died in despair after persecuting many gentleman protestants (1570, p. 2311, 1576, p. 2001, 1583, p. 2112). In reality, he was recalled to serve on the council of François II in 1559 and put his weight behind increasing leniency towards the protestants, seeking an amnesty for those who had been prosecuted for their religion. Following the discovery of the conspiracy at Amboise (February 1560), Olivier wanted the numbers of those put to death for taking part in the conspiracy limited to the leading figures. He was overruled and it was said (though it smacks of protestant propaganda) that he was overcome by melancholy when he died of a fever shortly thereafter on 30 March 1560. (Michaud, ed. Biographie Universelle ancienne et moderne. second edition ed. 45 vols. (Paris: A. Thoisnier Desplaces, 1843-) 31, pp. 253-55)

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George Dorell

Justice of Kent

Justice Drainer sent Gregory Dods before justice George Dorell, who banished him from the country. . 1563, p. 1730, 1576, p. 2002, 1583, p. 2112.

 
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Gregory Dods

Parson of Smarsden, Kent.

Justice Drainer of Kent disliked Gregory Dods and sent Roger Matthew to spy on him. 1563, p. 1730, 1576, p. 2002, 1583, p. 2113.

 
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John Drayner

(d. before 1570)

Justice. Of Smarden, Kent.

Drayner disliked Gregory Dods, the parson of Smarden, and sent Roger Matthew to spy on him. 1563, p. 1730, 1576, p. 2002, 1583, p. 2112.

Drayner sent Dods before justice George Dorell, who banished him from the country. . 1563, p. 1730, 1576, p. 2002, 1583, p. 2112.

Drayner drilled holes in the rood loft of the church to see who venerated the sacrament. This was discovered and he became nicknamed 'Justice Nine Holes' . 1563, p. 1730, 1576, p. 2002, 1583, p. 2113.

Drayner went to see the printer John Day and verbally attacked him for his portrayal in Foxe's work. Day derided him by calling him Justice Nine Holes and saying that he knew that Drayner had denied his real reason for drilling the holes. Drainer was alleged to have claimed in Cheapside to have drilled the holes to look on women. Drayner denied drilling all the holes and said that the parson drilled some also. . 1563, p. 1730, 1576, p. 2002, 1583, p. 2113.

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[Despite Drayner's requests while alive, Foxe did not remove the story from the Acts and Monuments, even after his death.]

 
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Roger Matthew

A servant of Justice Drayner. Of Kent.

Justice Drayner of Kent disliked Gregory Dods and sent Roger Matthew to spy on him. 1563, p. 1730, 1576, p. 2002, 1583, p. 2113.

 
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Canterbury
Cant., Canterb., Canterbury, Caunterbury, Caunterburye,
NGR: TR 150 580

An ancient city and county of itself, having separate jurisdiction. Locally in the hundred of Bridge and Petham, lathe of St. Augustine, eastern division of the county of Kent. 26 miles south-east by east from Rochester. The city comprises the parishes of All Saints, St. Alphege, St. Andrew, St. George, The Holy Cross, St. Margaret, St. Martin, St. Mary Bredman, St. Mary Bredin, St. Mary Magdalene, St. Mary Northgate, St. Mildred, St. Peter and St. Paul, all in the Diocese of Canterbury, and with the exception of St. Alphege and St. Martin within the Archdeaconry of Canterbury. The living of All Saints is a rectory with St. Mary in the Castle and St. Mildred attached; St. Alphege is a rectory exempt, united with the vicarage of St. Mary Northgate; St. Andrew is a rectory with St. Mary Bredman annexed; St. George is a rectory with St. Mary Magdalene annexed; St. Martin's is a rectory exempt with St. Paul's annexed; St. Peter's is a rectory with Holy Cross annexed; St. Mary Bredin is a vicarage; and St. Margaret's is a donative in the patronage of the Archdeacon

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Herstmonceaux
Herstnonceux
NGR: TQ 635 126

A parish in the hundred of Foxcorte, rape of Hastings, county of Sussex. 4 miles east from Hailsham. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry of Lewes, diocese of Chichester.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Smarden
NGR: TQ 880 424

A parish in the hundred of Colehill, Lathe of Scray, county of Kent. 8 miles north-east by east from Cranbrook, and 46 miles south-east by east from London. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Canterbury.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2135 [2112]

Queene Mary. The terrible end of persecutors of the Gospell.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.frō Brabant by king Philip, but nothing auayled, so that the xj. day after, that is, the x. of Iuly,. 1559. he ended his life in great dolour, hauing raigned xij. yeares, three monethes and ten dayes. MarginaliaHenry 2. the French king stricken and killed in his owne iusting.

Some report, that among other wordes he said, that he feared he was strickē for casting þe poore christians wrongfully in prisō: MarginaliaThe deuelishe perswasion of the Cardinall of Loraine at the death of the French king.but the Cardinal of Loraine standing by (as he was alwayes at hād) sayd vnto him, that it was the enemy that tempted him, & that he should be stedfast in the fayth. By this meanes the Hall which was prepared for a place of ioy and gladnes, did now serue for a Chappel to keepe the corps, being dressed with blacke mourning cloth, & night and day there was nothing heard but mournyng and lamenting for the space of xl, dayes.

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MarginaliaCertayne gentlemen executed at Amboyse for standing against the house of Guyse.About two yeares after this, which was the yeare of our Lord. 1561. 

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 661, fn 1

{Cattley/Pratt alters '1561' to '1560' in the text.} See Henault, "Chron. de l'Hist. de France;" vol. ii. p. 581. - ED.

there were certayne Gentlemen put to death at Amboise, for taking armes agaynst the house of Guise. Touching which Gentlemen, this is to be noted, that as one of thē should be brought to the place of executiō, where the other lay dead before him, he thrust his handes into the bloud of two of his companions which were there beheaded, and then lifting them vp to heauen, cryed with a loud voyce: Lord behold the bloud of thy childrē: thou wilt in time and place reuenge it.

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MarginaliaThe Lordes punishement vpon the Chauncellour Oliuier for his sentence geuen agaynst certayne gentlemen Protestantes.Not long after the same, the Chancellor Oliuier,  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 661, line 9

See Thuani Hist. lib. xxiv. ¶ 24: and "Rerum in Gallia ob religionem gestarum libri tres," 1570. Serranus, or Jen de Serres, is supposed to have been the author of these Commentaries, five parts of which were published, and enlarged Editons, from 1570 to 1590. It tells much for its credibility that Thuanus has made such ample use of the work, and not less so that it should have found a place in the Roman "Index lib. Prohib.," Freytag's "Apparatus Liter." tom. iii. p. 250, and the "Biblioth. Historique de la France," Edit. 1719, p. 408.

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who was condemner of thē, at the instigatiō and pursuit of the Cardinall of Loraine, through great remorse of cōscience fell sicke, and in a frensy casting out sighes vncessauntly, & afflicting himselfe after a fearefull and straūge fasion for his vnrighteous sentence, and more then barbarous cruelty, shriked vpon a sodeyne with an horrible cry, & sayd: O Cardinall thou wilt make vs all to be damned. And within a very few dayes after he dyed.

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MarginaliaThe death of Fraunces 2. french king after he began to withstande the course of the Gospell.Fraunces the second of that name, king of Fraunce, at the perswasion of the Cardinall of Loraine & of certeyne others, caused an assēbly of the Estates of the realm in the towne of Orleans, among other things to mainteine the Papall See, to the ouerthrow of those which would lyue after the sincerity of the gospel: MarginaliaHow the Lord worketh for his Gospell.but being fallen sick, shortly after in the foresayd place, of a feuer, through an Impostume in his left eare, he dyed, the fourth of Decemb. 1561. hauing raigned but one yeare and about fiue monethes.

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It was sayd of this king Fraunces (as the authour aboue mentioned reporteth) that when he was drawyng toward his end, the Cardinal of Loraine made him to say and pronounce these words which follow: MarginaliaThe wordes of king Fraunces at his death.Lord forgeue me my trespasses, and impute not vnto me the faultes which my ministers haue done vnder my name and authority.

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MarginaliaThe terrible stroke of Gods reuenge vpon Carol. 9. the French king.Neither is it vnworthy of obseruation, that after the father happened in much like sort by gods mighty iudgement vpon Carol. 9. his second sonne, & brother to Frances aboue mentioned, in these our latter dayes, who after the horrible and bloudy murder of the Admyrall,  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 661, fn 2

Admiral Chatillon, one of the leaders of the Huguenots, murdered at the massacre of St. Bartholomew at Paris, in 1572. - ED.

& other true professors of Christes Gospell, both men, womē, and children, to the nūber of many thousandes, of diuers Cityes, in so much that the prisōs & streetes are said to be coloured wt bloud, smoking after such a cruell sort, as in our time or country the like hath not hitherto bene sene: by the terrible stroke of gods iust reuenge, the same king, by credible report of story, is sayd to dye of bleeding, not onely at his eares and nose, but in all other places of his bodye, where bloud might haue any issue.

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MarginaliaThe death of Charles the Emperour.Vnto these afore recited historyes of king Henry and hys two Sonnes, might also be added the death of the Emperour Charles the fift. Who in like maner beyng an enemy, and a great terrour to the Gospell, was cut of like wise for doing any more hurt to the Church, muche about the same time, an. 1558. which was but three monethes before the death of Queene Mary, and ten monethes before the death of the sayd Henry the 2. Touching the death of which Charles and Henry, & Fraunces, this Epitaph folowing was written in Latine verses, and printed in the French story booke, aboue alledged. 

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 661, bottom

They will be found in the "Rerum in Gallia ob religionem gestarum libri tres," 1570, p. 69. With respect to Charles V, it may be well to consult M'Crie's "History of the Reformation in Spain" (Edinburgh, 1829), p. 246; and to compare Sandoval's account, which was translated and printed separately. See "Hist. captiv. Francisci I., necnon vitæ Caroli V. in Monasterio" (Mediolani, 1715) by Adam Ebert, or in the Spanish original lib. 33, ¶ 9.

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MarginaliaAn Epitaphe vpon Charles Emperour. Henry. 2. French king, and Fraunces his sonne.Consilijs Christum oppugnans & fraudibus, ingens
Regum ille terror Carolus,
Ipsis ridiculus pueris, furiosus & excors,
Totus repentè corruit.
Tuʠ: Henrice, malis dum consultoribus vtens,
Sitis piorum sanguinem,
Ipse tuo vecors inopina cæde peremptus,
Terram imbuisti sanguine.
Henrici deinceps sectans vestigia patris
Franciscus infœlix puer,
Clamantem Christum surda dum negligit aure,
Aure putrefacta corruit.
Versuti, fatui, surdi, hæc spectacula Reges,
Vos sapere vel mori iubent.

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Not long after Anne du Bourges death, MarginaliaThe sodaine death of President Minard.the President Minard, who was a sore persecutour, and the condemner of the sayd Anne du Bourg, as he returned from the Pallace or Counsell chamber, to his owne house, beyng vpon his Mule, euen hard by his house was slayne with a Dag  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 662, line 15

"D'un coup de pistolet" are the words of De la Place (p. 30), which may explain "dag."

but who was the doer thereof, or for what cause hee was slayne, for all the inquisition and dilligent searche þt coulde be made, it was neuer knowne.

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MarginaliaThe punishment of God vpon the king of Nauarre after he had reuolted from the Gospell to Popery.Amongst many other examples worthy to be noted, let vs also consider the end of the K. of Nauarre, brother to the worthy Prince of Condy, who after he had susteined a certayne time, the cause of the Gospell, at length being allured by the flattering words of þe Duke of Guise and the Cardinall of Loraine  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 662, line 22

"Ce prêtre perfide et sanguinaire s'etoit déclaré Luthérien dans une entreuve avec le Duc de Wurtemburg à Saverne, afin de ne pas aigrir les Protestants d'Allemagne, et de pouvoir continuer sans obstacle à faire assassiner et massacrer les Calvinistes de France." See Varillas Histoire de Charles IX., tom. i. 122; Cologne, 1684: De Potter's "Lettres de Saint Pie," Bruxelles, 1827, p. ii: and Smedley's Hist. of Reform. in France, ii. 36, 37.
"D'abord il (Card. Lorraine) s'insinua par de basses complaisances dans les bonnes graces de Diane de Poitiers, maitresse de Henri II., qui disposoit de ce Monarque et par lui du Royaume ... Il fut premier qui fit de la Bastile l'instrument ordinaire des vengeances ministérielles ... Il inventa les lettres de cachet ... Il regardoit l'Inquisition comme l'instrument le plus sû de ses vengeances secretes, et il fit tous ses efforts pour introduire en France -
'ce sanglant Tribunal,
Ce monument affreux du pouvoir monacal.'"
Du Massacre de la St. Barthelemi, Discours Historique par Gabr. Brizard; pt. ii. pp. 14-16.

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his brother, and vpon hope to haue his landes restored againe, which the king of Spayne reteyned from him, was contented to alter his religion and to ioyne side with the Papists, and so being in camp with the Duke of Guise at the siege of Roane,  
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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 662, fn 1

Oct. 15th, 1562. - ED.

was there shot in with a pellet. After which wound receiued, being brought to a towne three miles from the campe, called Preaux, hee did vehemently repent and lament his backsliding fromþe Gospell, promising to God most earnestly, þt if hee might escape that hurt, he woulde bring to passe that the Gospell should be preached freely through all Fraunce: Notwithstanding within fiue or sixe dayes after he dyed.

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MarginaliaThe Duke of Guyse slaine before Orleance. The Constable before Paris. The Marshall of S. Andrew before Dreux.Neyther did the Duke of Guise himselfe, the greate Archenemy of God and his Gospell, continue in life long after that, but both he with þe whole triumuirat of France that is, three the greatest captayns of popery, were cut off for doyng any more hurt, to wit, the Duke of Guise before Orleance, the Constable  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 662, fn 2

Anne de Montmorenci; Nov. 10th, 1567. - ED.

before Paris, the Marshal  
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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 662, fn 3

Jacques d'Albon; in 1562. - ED.

of S. Andrew before Dreux.

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¶ Of the Emperour Sigismundus. 
Commentary  *  Close

This anecdote was added in the 1576 edition.

Amongest others, here is not to bee past ouer nor forgotten the notable examples of Gods iust scourge vppon Sigismundus þe Emperour, of whō mentiō is made before, in the condemnation of Iohn Husse, & Hierome of Prage, pag. 596. After the deathe and wrongfull condemnation of which blessed martyrs: nothing afterward went prosperously with the sayd Emperour, but all contrary: so that both he dyed without issue, & in his warres euer wēt to the worst. And not long after, Ladislaus his daughters sonne king of Hungary, fighting agaynst the Turk, was slayne in the fielde. So that in the tyme of one generation, al the posteritie & ofspring of this Emperor perished. Besides this, Barbara his wife came to suche ruine, by her wicked leudnes, þt she became a shame and slaunder to the name & state of all Queenes. Whereby all Christian princes and Emperours may sufficiently bee admonished, if they haue grace, what it is to defile themselues with the bloude of Christes blessed sayntes and Martyrs.

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¶ A note of Christoper Parker. 
Commentary  *  Close

This anecdote was added in the 1576 edition.

CHristopher Parker, called Parker the wilde, mentioned before in this booke of Monumentes, pag. 1986. who being a persecuter of Richard Woodman, did manacle his handes with a corde, did cast himselfe into a pond, and so drowned himselfe at Herstnonceux in Sussex, the 8. of September. 1575.

The story of one Drayner of Kent, commonly called Iustice Nyne hooles.

MarginaliaThe story of one Drayner otherwise called Iustice nine holes.I May not in this place omit the tragedy of one Drayner of Smarden in the County of Kent, Esquire, who bearing grudge against one Gregory Doddes, Parson of the sayde towne, for reprouing his vicious lyfe, sent for hym by two men, which tooke hym & brought him before him, where he was had into a Parlour, as it were to breakfast. In which behinde þe doore he had placed one Roger Mathew secretly, to beare witnes what he shuld say, no more being in sight but þe sayd Drayner & one of hys men, who willed and perswaded him to speake freely his minde, for that there was not sufficient record of his wordes to hurt him. MarginaliaA malitious practise to intrappe a good man.But the Lord kept his talke without perill, wherby the sayd Drayner sent hym to the next Iustice called M. George Dorell, who perceiuing it to be done more of malice thē otherwise, deliuered him vpon sureties, to appeare at the next Sessions at Cant. and at length was banished the Countrey.

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This sayd Drayner afterward, being chosen Iustice, to shew himselfe diligent in seeking þe trouble of his neighbors, made in þe Rodeloft nyne hooles, that he might looke about the church in Masse tyme. In which place alway at the sacring therof, he would stand to see who looked not, or

held
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