Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Alban Langdale

Fellow of St Johns College, Cambridge (1534); BD (1544); DD (1554) (Venn). Parson of Buxted, Sussex. Chaplain to Lord Montague.

John Kingston stated that he had requested Anthony Clarke, and Alban Langdale and Anthony Brown to expose unlawful writings and books. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Alban Langdale accused and examined several prisoners in Chichester. 1563, p. 1634, 1570, p. 2220, 1576, p. 1815, 1583, p. 2023.

Woodman's third examination took place before Alban Langdale and Master James Gage at Montague's house, beside St Mary Overy's, Southwark, on 12 May 1557. 1570, p. 2182-88, 1576, p. 1884-89, 1583, pp. 1992-97.

Woodman's fifth examination took place before Winchester, Nicholas Harpsfield, Langdale, a fat-headed priest, and many others at St Mary Overy's church on 15 June 1557. 1563, pp. 1599-1601, 1570, pp. 2190-92, 1576, pp. 1890-92, 1583, pp. 1999-2000.

[NB: Alban Langdale was one of the Cambridge doctors appointed by the university to participate in the Oxford disputations of 1554. Foxe had in his possession the letter from the vice-chancellor and senate of Cambridge, dated 10 April 1554, authorising the seven theologians to participate in the disputation (Harley 416, fol. 39r), as well as a letter from Cambridge University to Hugh Weston dated 10 April 1554 informing him that the seven were being sent (Harley 422, fol. 101r); both letters specifically described Langdale as one of the seven theologians. But he was not active in the debates and because Foxe's informants do not mention him, he is never mentioned anywhere in Foxe's entire account of the Oxford debates.]

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Cuthbert Scott

(d. 1569)

Bishop of Chester (1556 - 1559) (DNB); master of Christ's College, Cambridge (1553 - 1556) (Venn)

Cuthbert Scott was appointed to debate with Latimer in the Oxford disputations of 1554 (1563, p. 934).

He was one of the official disputants in the Oxford disputations of 1554 (1563, pp. 936-38; 1570, pp. 1591-92; 1576, pp. 1358-59; 1583, pp. 1428-30).

In an attempt to reinstate catholicism at the University of Cambridge, a commission under the direction of Cardinal Pole ordered the condemning and burning of the bones and books of Phagius and Martin Bucer. Members of the commission were Cuthbert Scott, Nicholas Ormanet, Thomas Watson, John Christopherson and Henry Cole. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570].

[Back to Top]

Cuthbert Scott was chosen by Pole to be a persecutor of the University of Cambridge. 1563, p. 1537, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

Scott responded to John Stokes' oration at Cambridge University on 11 January 1557. 1563, p. 1539, 1570, p. 2144, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1958.

Brassey again excused himself at St Mary's church on 12 January 1557. Scott answered his words. 1563, p. 1540, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1958.

Scott, Watson and Christopherson interdicted St Mary's Church, Cambridge, where Bucer was buried.1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 1959.

On 14 January 1557, after the examination of the provost and vice-provost of Cambridge, Thomas Bacon invited Perne, Dr Young, Dr Harvey, Swinborne, and Maptide to come to dinner. He was examined before Scott, Watson and Christopherson on 14 January 1557. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2146, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1960.

[Back to Top]

Scott spoke with Nicholas Carre, as a former pupil of Bucer, about the heresies of Bucer. 1563, p. 1540, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1957.

Carre denounced Scott's opinion of Bucer and sent him into a rage, berating Carre for his words at Bucer's burial. Scott desisted when no one presented any evidence against Carre's actions. 1563, p. 1540, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1957.

Scott made an oration at the condemnation of Bucer and Phagius. 1570, p. 2148, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1961.

The condemnation of Bucer was given the bishop of Chester's seal. 1570, p. 2148, 1576, p. 1868, 1583, p. 1961.

John Hullier appeared before Shaxton, Young, Segewick, Scott, Mitch and others on Palm Sunday eve at Great St Mary's. 1570, p. 2196, 1576, p. 1895, 1583, p. 2004.

Dr Dakins was given commission by the bishop of Chester to examine John and Richard Snell. 1570, [unnumbered sheet at beginning of volume 1], 1576, 2008, 1583, p. 2150.

Cuthbert Scott was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

Scott was in the Fleet but escaped to Louvain and died there. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Edmund Gest

(1517? - 1577)

Bishop of Rochester. (DNB)

Foxe refers to Edmund Gest's installation at Elizabeth's accession. 1583, p. 2185.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Edmund Grindal

(1519? - 1583)

Marian exile. DD (1564). Bishop of London (1559 - 1570). Archbishop of York (1570 - 1576). Archbishop of Canterbury (1576 - 1583). [Fasti; DNB; Venn]

Edmund Grindal's exile was mentioned in Bradford's letter to the university town of Cambridge. 1563, pp. 1178-80, 1570, pp. 1808-09, 1576, p. 1545, 1583, p. 1627.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. He mentioned his imprisonment with Cranmer, Latimer and Bradford. He mentioned that he knew that Ferrar, Hooper, Rogers, Taylor of Hadleigh, Saunders and Tomkins, a weaver, had all been martyred, as had Cardmaker the day before he wrote this letter. He had heard that West had relented, and Grimald cast into the Marshalsea. He had also heard that Thomas Ridley, of the Bull-head in Cheapside, had died. In addition, he had heard that his brother-in-law, Shipside, had spent much time in prison but was now released. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

[Back to Top]

Edmund Grindal was a pall bearer at Bucer's funeral. 1563, p. 1559., 1570, p. 2153, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

Edmund Grindal, with Matthew Parker, bore Martin Bucer's body on his shoulders. 1563, p. 1554 [recte 1562]

Matthew Parker, Edmund Grindal and Richard Goodrick requested that the body of Peter Martyr's wife be buried honourably. 1563, p. 1559., 1570, p. 2153, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

Edmund Grindal was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

Foxe refers to his installation as bishop of London after Elizabeth's accession. 1583, p. 2128.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Edwin Sandys

(1519? - 1588)

Bishop of Worcester (1559 - 1570); London. Elizabethan archbishop of York (DNB)

Supporter of Northumberland and Lady Jane Grey. Vice-Chancellor of Cambridge rather than Chancellor as Foxe has him.

Edwin Sandys was put in the Tower with Northumberland 25 July 1553 (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1465).

Bland was schoolmaster to Sandys, bishop of Worcester. 1563, p. 1218, 1570, p. 1843, 1576, p. 1577, 1583, p. 1665.

A letter from Ridley and his fellow prisoners to Bradford and his fellow prisoners in the King's Bench in 1554 stated that Ridley longed to hear of Father Crome, Doctor Sandys, Masters Saunders, Veron, Beacon and Rogers. 1563, p. 1294, 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1624, 1583, p. 1724.

Northumberland sent for Sandys, Parker, Bill and Leaver to have supper with him. 1583, p. 2086.

Parker and Sandys were made bishops. 1583, p. 2086.

John Gates was made a deacon. Sandys was expected to preach. Foxe records Sandys' actions the night before he preached. 1583, p. 2086.

During Sandys' sermon, he was handed a mass book and grail, which Sir George Haward had taken in Master Hurlestone's house, where Lady Grey had previously attended mass. 1583, p. 2086.

As Sandys was delivering his sermon, Adams, one of the beadles, came weeping to Leaver to tell him that Mary had been proclaimed queen and the duke's plans thwarted. 1583, p. 2086.

Northumberland and others requested Sandys to put his sermon in writing and appointed Leaver to take it to London to have it printed. 1583, p. 2086.

Sandys required a day and a half to write out his sermon. 1583, p. 2086.

Sandys gave the written copy of his sermon to Layfield. 1583, p. 2087.

Leaver went to dinner at the house of More (a beadle and a great friend of his). 1583, p. 2087.

Mistress More toasted Sandys at dinner, saying that it was the last time she would see him. She died before Sandys returned from Germany. 1583, p. 2087.

Northumberland retired to Cambridge and asked Sandys to go to the market place with him to proclaim Mary. 1583, p. 2087.

Northumberland wept at the proclamation. 1583, p. 2087.

Northumberland was arrested. 1583, p. 2087.

John Gates sharply rebuked the guards who looked to take Sandys. 1583, p. 2087.

Gates advised Sandys to walk in the fields. 1583, p. 2087.

University officials organised the taking of the statute book, keys and various things from Sandys' lodgings by Mouse and Hatcher. 1583, p. 2087.

As Sandys took his seat in the university, Mitch conspired to have him seized from his chair but Sandys began his oration to justify his sermon. 1583, p. 2087.

Mitch and twenty followers came to drag Sandys from his seat. 1583, p. 2087.

Dr Bill and Dr Blith persuaded Sandys not to use his dagger against his attackers. 1583, p. 2087.

Sandys was able to finish his oration. 1583, p. 2087.

Master Jerningham and Thomas Mildmay took Sandys to prison. 1583, p. 2087.

Mildmay said that he marvelled at what Sandys had said the day before his arrest. 1583, p. 2087.

Huddlestone took one of Sandys' geldings. 1583, p. 2087.

Sandys was taken in procession to the Tower. 1583, p. 2087.

Sandys, having spent three weeks in a bad prison, was imprisoned in the nun's bower with John Bradford. 1583, p. 2087.

Mitchell spoke with Sandys in prison. 1583, p. 2087.

John Bowler was keeper to Sandys, Bradford and Saunders. 1583, p. 2087.

Bowler was kind to Sandys and received the sacrament from him with Bradford. 1583, p. 2087.

Norfolk sent arms against Wyatt. 1583, p. 2087.

Bradford was imprisoned with Cranmer and Ridley, while Sandys and others were removed to the Marshalsea. 1583, p. 2087.

Thomas Way, the keeper of the Marshalsea, appointed a man to every prisoner he moved. He conversed with Sandys as he was being transferred. 1583, p. 2088.

Way trusted Sandys to meet with Bradford in the fields and later return to prison. 1583, p. 2088.

Thomas Way would not let Sir Thomas Holcroft's servant put fetters on Sandys. 1583, p. 2088.

Way allowed Saunder in to see Sandys, and Sandys' daughter also. 1583, p. 2088.

When Wyatt came to Southwark he sent two men to speak with Sandys in the Marshalsea, and they offered to open the gates of the prison for him. Sandys said he would not be assisted unless it was God's will. 1583, p. 2088.

After nine weeks' imprisonment in the Marshalsea, Holcroft allowed Sandys to be set free. 1583, p. 2088.

Holcroft petitioned Gardiner for Sandys' release. 1583, p. 2088.

Holcroft attended the queen with Sandys' remission. 1583, p. 2088.

Mary, Winchester and Holcroft signed Sandys' release papers. 1583, p. 2088.

Holcroft met with two gentleman friends of Sandys and offered to be bound in surety for him. 1583, p. 2088.

Sandys said that he wished to go abroad, which did not please Holcroft. 1583, p. 2088.

Holcroft told Sandys that his cousin, Sir Edward Bray, would receive him and his wife and that he must be patient. 1583, p. 2088.

Sandys bade farewell to Saunders and his other fellow prisoners, and later talked with Bradford and Ferrar. 1583, p. 2088.

Watson and Christopherson told Winchester that he had set a heretic free. Winchester then sent men to apprehend Sandys. 1583, p. 2088.

Sandys went to the house of Master Bartley (a stranger who had been imprisoned with Sandys for some time). 1583, p. 2088.

Sandys went to the home of Hurlestone (a skinner) in Cornhill. Hurlestone had his man Quinting provide two geldings for Sandys to ride to his father-in-law's house in Essex, where his wife was. 1583, p. 2088.

Benjamin (a tailor and constable of the town) and Mrs. Hurlstone told Sandys not to be afraid of those who were looking for him. 1583, p. 2088.

Benjamin told Sandys that the constable who arrested Sandys would receive £5. 1583, p. 2088.

Benjamin told Sandys of his plot to help him escape, as his persecutors knew of his plans. 1583, p. 2088.

Sandys removed to the house of a farmer, near the sea, and then on to that of James Mower, a shipbuilder, who lived in Milton Shore. He spent two nights there and gave an exhortation to 40-50 mariners there. 1583, p. 2088.

Sandys met with Master Isaac of Kent, who sent his eldest son with Sandys. 1583, p. 2088.

Sandys and Coxe made their escape on board Cockrel's ship. 1583, p. 2088.

They arrived in Antwerp and went to dine with Master Locke. 1583, p. 2088.

While Sandys was at dinner, his kinsman George Gilpin, secretary to the English House, came in and warned Sandys that he was under instruction from King Philip to find and seize him. 1583, p. 2088.

Sandys and his retinue fled to Ausburg and then on to Strasburg. 1583, p. 2088.

Sandys was in Strasbourg for one year before his wife joined him. 1583, p. 2088.

Sandys' wife was with him for nine months and then was taken ill and died of a consumption. 1583, p. 2088.

After the death of Sandys' wife, Master Sampson, a man skillful in Hebrew, went to Emanuel College, Cambridge. Grindal went into the country to learn Dutch. 1583, p. 2088.

Sandys remained in Strasbourg, sustained by Master Isaac, who gave him many gifts and 100 marks, which Sandys was later able to return to him. 1583, p. 2088.

After the death of his wife, Sandys went to stay with Peter Martyr in Zurich for five weeks. 1583, p. 2088.

Sandys was at dinner with Martyr when they learned of the news of Mary's death. 1583, p. 2088.

Martyr and Jarret rejoiced at the news of Mary's death. 1583, p. 2088.

Sandys ate with Bullinger and others before returning to Strasburg. 1583, p. 2088.

Grindal and Sandys arrived in London on the day of Elizabeth's coronation. 1583, p. 2088.

Foxe refers to his installation as bishop of Worcester after Elizabeth's accession. 1583, p. 2128.

[He is also referred to by Foxe as 'Sanders' and 'D. Sandes'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Henry Cole

(1500? - 1580)

LL.D. (1556 - 1557) Archdeacon of Ely (1553). Provost of Eton (1554). Dean of St Paul's (1556). Vicar general to Cardinal Pole. Judge of the archiepiscopal court. Dean of the Arches (1557). (DNB)

Henry Cole was one of the catholic disputants in the Oxford disputations of 1554. During the debates, Cole had short acrimonious exchanges with Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer (1563, pp. 932, 938, 944-46, 951, 955, 969 and 972; 1570, pp. 1591, 1593, 1581[recte 1597]-99, 1602 and 1605-6; 1576, pp. 1358-59, 1362-64, 1367 and 1371; 1583, pp. 1428, 1430, 1433-35, 1438 and 1440-41).

[Back to Top]

Later in the disputation, he interrupted the debate and called Latimer a liar (1563, p. 984; 1570, p. 1627; 1576, p 1388; and 1583, p. 1458).

Cole was secretly asked to prepare a funeral sermon for Cranmer. 1563, p. 1498, 1570, p. 2063, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1885.

Cole preached a sermon prior to the martyrdom of Cranmer. 1563, p. 1498, 1570, p. 2065, 1576, p. 1781, 1583, pp. 1885-86.

In an attempt to reinstate catholicism at the University of Cambridge, a commission under the direction of Cardinal Pole ordered the condemning and burning of the bones and books of Phagius and Martin Bucer. Members of the commission were Cuthbert Scott, Nicholas Ormanet, Thomas Watson, John Christopherson and Henry Cole. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570]

[Back to Top]

Henry Cole was chosen by Pole to be a persecutor of the University of Cambridge. 1563, p. 1537, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

Cole was sent to King's College, Cambridge, to examine certain scholars on 9 January 1557. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2143, 1576, p. 1863, 1583, p. 1956.

He was awarded a doctorate at Cambridge. 1570, p. 2150, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1963.

William Holcot was charged with treason by Cole and Geffre for supporting Cranmer. 1583, p. 2135.

Cole was one of those holding a commission from Cardinal Pole to disinter Peter Martyr's wife and burn her bones. 1563, p. 1558, 1570, p. 2152, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

He was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Bonner sent Thomas Hinshaw before John Harpsfield and Henry Cole. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Elizabeth Young's eighth examination was before Bonner, the dean of St Paul's and Story. 1570, pp. 2273-74, 1576, pp. 1962-63, 1583, pp. 2069-70.

Her ninth examination took place before the dean. 1570, p. 2274, 1576, p. 1963, 1583, p. 2070.

Cole was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Aylmer

(d. 1594)

Archdeacon of Stow, later archdeacon of Lincoln and bishop of London (1577 - 1594) (DNB).

Aylmer is commended as Lady Jane Grey's tutor and a learned man in 1563, p. 901; 1570, p. 1567; 1576, p 1336; and 1583, p. 1406.

Aylmer was one of six clerics - the others were Walter Phillips, James Haddon, John Philpot, Richard Cheyney and Thomas Young - who argued against the Real Presence in the 1553 convocation (1563, pp. 906-7, 912 and 914; 1570, pp. 1571-72 and 1575-76 [recte 1577]; 1576, pp 1340-41 and 1344-45; 1583, pp. 1410-11 and 1414 and 1416; also see Rerum, pp. 215, 217, 224-25 and 228. Cf. John Philpot, The trew report of the dysputacyon had and begonne in the convocacyon hous at London the xviii daye of Octobre MDLIII. [Emden, 1554]. (STC 19890 sigs A3r - A4r, B1r-v, C8r-v, D1r and D7v))

[Back to Top]

John Aylmer was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

[Also referred to as 'Aelmer', 'Ælmar', 'Elmar', 'Elmer']

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Jewel

(1522 - 1571)

Bishop of Salisbury (1559 - 1571). [DNB]

John Jewel served, together with Gilbert Mounson, as one of two 'protestant' notaries at the 1554 Oxford disputations; he was approved by Ridley for this role (1570, p. 1607; 1576, p. 1371; 1583, p. 1442; cf. 1563, p. 958, where Ridley's approval of Jewel and Mounson is described but they are not named).

[Back to Top]

Harding's attack on Jewel is referred to in Foxe's attack on Harding's defence of the persecution of Peritone Massey. 1570, p. 2131, 1576, p. 1852, 1583, p. 1946.

John Jewel was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

Foxe refers to his installation after Elizabeth's accession. 1583, p. 2128.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Scory

(d. 1585)

Bishop of Rochester (1551 - 1552). Bishop of Chichester (1552 - 1553) and of Hereford (1559 - 1585) [DNB]

John Scory's exile is mentioned in Bradford's letter to the university town of Cambridge. 1563, pp. 1178-80, 1570, pp. 1808-09., 1576, p. 1545, 1583, p. 1627.

Scory, bishop of Rochester, visited Cranmer. He took a copy of Cranmer's writings about the rumour that he had said the mass (when Thornden had in fact said it) and had it published. Cranmer was commanded to appear before the council and bring an inventory of his goods. 1563, p. 1479, 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

[Back to Top]

Elizabeth Young said that Scory had taught her doctrine. 1570, p. 2271, 1576, p. 1960, 1583, p. 2067.

John Scory was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

Foxe refers to his installation as bishop of Hereford after Elizabeth's accession. 1583, p. 2128.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John White

(1510? - 1560)

Bishop of Lincoln (1554 - 1556), bishop of Winchester (1556 - 1559) (Fasti; DNB)

John White was created bishop of Lincoln in 1554 (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1467).

He was the author of commendatory verses for Philip and Mary's marriage, (1563, p. 1004; 1570, p. 1642; 1576, p. 1401; 1583, p. 1471).

On 14 February 1555 Percival Creswell, an old acqauintance of Bradford's, went to visit Bradford in prison. He offered to make suit for Bradford. He returned later, at 11 o'clock, with another man and gave Bradford a book by More, desiring him to read it. He told Bradford that the lords of York, Lincoln and Bath wished to speak with him. Then at 3 o'clock the same day, Dr Harding, the bishop of Lincoln's chaplain, went to see Bradford in prison. Harding talked of his fear for Bradford's soul, and that he himself had spoken against Peter Martir, Martin Bucer, Luther and others for their beliefs. 1563, p. 1200, 1570, pp. 1790-91, 1576, p. 1529, 1583, pp. 1612-13.

[Back to Top]

An examination of Ridley and Latimer was conducted by White (Lincoln), Brookes (Gloucester) and Holyman (Bristol) on 30 September 1555. White, Brookes and Holyman received their commission from Cardinal Pole. 1563, pp. 1297-98, 1570, pp. 1903-09, 1576, pp. 1631-39, 1583, pp. 1757-60.

White was present during the second private conference between Philpot and Bonner. 1563, pp. 1419-20, 1570, pp. 1982-83, 1576, pp. 1706-07, 1583, pp. 1812-13.

Thomas Benbridge was examined by John White, bishop of Winchester. 1563, p. 1667, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1940, 1583, p. 2046.

John White would not be swayed by the truth of Gratwick's argument. 1570, p. 2162, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1976.

Woodman's fourth examination took place before White (Winchester), Rochester, a certain doctor and others on 25 May 1557. 1563, pp. 1596-99, 1570, pp. 2188-90, 1576, pp. 1889-90, 1583, pp. 1997-99.

Woodman's fifth examination took place before Winchester, Nicholas Harpsfield, Langdale, a fat-headed priest, and many others at St Mary Overy's church on 15 June 1557. 1563, pp. 1599-1601, 1570, pp. 2190-92, 1576, pp. 1890-92, 1583, pp. 1999-2000.

The sixth and last examination of Woodman took place before Chichester, Roper, Nicholas Harpsfield, the fat priest, Winchester and others. He was condemned by Winchester and others.1563, 1599-1601, 1570, p. 2192-94, 1576, p. 1892-93, 1583, pp. 2000-02.

White was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

He died after Queen Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Owen Oglethorpe

(d. 1559)

President of Magdalen College, Oxford (1535 - 1552 and 1553 - 1559); dean of Windsor (1554 - 1556); bishop of Carlisle (1557 - 1559). Performed the coronation ceremony for Elizabeth. [see DNB ].

Owen Oglethorpe was one of the participants in the Oxford disputations of 1554 (1563, pp. 936-38, 943-44, 969 and 971; 1570, pp. 1591-93, 1596-981[recte 1597], 1616 and 1618; 1576, pp. 1358-59, 1362 and 1379-80 and 1583, pp. 1428-30, 1432-33, 1449 and 1451).

[NB: A brief account of the Oxford disputations, only in 1563, mentions Oglethorpe debating with Cranmer (1563, p. 933). He is listed as debating with Ridley (1563, p. 934; 1570, p. 1606; 1576, p. 1371; 1583, p. 1441).]

According to Foxe, Oglethorpe was present when William Glynn asked Ridley's forgiveness for insulting him during Ridley's disputation on 17 April (1563, p. 971; 1570, p. 1618; 1576, p. 1380; 1583, p. 1451).

Elizabeth spent the night at the house of the dean of Windsor on her way to Woodstock. 1570, p. 2292, 1576, p. 1985, 1583, p. 2094.

Oglethorpe was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

Owen Oglethorpe died after Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Ralph Bayne

(d. 1559)

Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield (1554 - 1559) [DNB]

Latimer's adversaries are listed: bishop of Ely (preached against him in King's College); Dr Watson (Master of Christ's College); Dr Norton (Master of Clare); Dr Philo (Master of Michael House); Dr Metcalfe (Master of St John); Dr Blith (of the King's Hall); Dr Bullock (Master of Queen's College); Dr Palmes (Master of St Nicholas hostel); Bayne, Rud and Greenwood of St John's; Brikenden, of St John's also, and said to have been a scholar of Latimer's. 1563, p. 1307, 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

[Back to Top]

Robert Glover believed that after Bayne and Draycot had read his letter to the mayor of Coventry they had decided to attempt to do away with Glover while he was in prison 1570, p. 1888, 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

In the letter to his wife, Glover stated that he was examined before the bishop of Coventry in Denton's house . 1563, pp. 1273-80, 1570, pp. 1886-89, 1576, pp. 1615-19, 1583, pp. 1710-12.

Robert Glover was examined and condemned by Draycot and Bayne. 1563, p. 1281, 1570, p1889., 1576, p. 1618, 1583, p. 1712.

When friends and family of William Glover tried to have Glover buried in his local church, Bernard, the clerk (whom Foxe believed still to be clerk in 1570), refused his burial. Bernard rode to bishop Raufe Bayne for advice. After two days and one night, Bernard returned with a letter from Bayne which demanded that Glover not be buried in the churchyard. Some of the villagers dragged his body by horse (as it had now begun to stink so badly they could not touch him) and then buried him in a broom field. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1891, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

[Back to Top]

Bayne wrote a letter to the parish of Weme. 1563, p. 1277, 1570, p. 1891, 1576, p. 1620, 1583, p. 1714.

Cornelius Bungey was condemned by Ralph Baynes, bishop of Coventry. Articles were raised against Bungey which he answered. 1563, pp. 1282-83, 1570, p. 1890, 1576, p. 1619, 1583, p. 1714.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

John Philpot's final examination, on 16 December 1555, was before the bishops of London, Bath, Worcester and Lichfield. 1563, p. 1442, 1570, pp. 1997-98, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1827.

John Colstock, Nicholas Ball, Thomas Flyer, Thomas Pyot, Henry Crimes and Thomas Johnson, among others, were examined in the diocese of Lichfield by Ralph Bayne for his beliefs. 1563, p. 1528, 1570, p. 2098, 1576, p. 1810, 1583, p. 1917.

Bayne persecuted Joan Waste of Derby. 1563, p. 1545, 1570, p. 2137, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1951.

He is described by Foxe as the cruel bishop of Coventry. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Draycot and Bayne examined the following but later dismissed them: John Adale, Anthony Afterwhittle, Thomas Arch, Thomas Arnal, John Avines, Henry Birdlim, Eustache Bysacre, Julius Dudley, William Enderby, Richard Foxal, John Frankling, Anthony Jones, Richard Kempe, John Leach, Hugh Lynacres, Thomas Lynacres, William Marler, Hugh Moore, William Mosley, Martin Newman, Isabel Parker, Cicely Preston, John Richardson, John Robinson, Thomas Sailter, William Shene, John Stamford, Thomas Steilbe, Thomas Underdone, Francis Ward, Richard Weaver, Thomas Wilson, and Richard Woodburne. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

[Back to Top]

Robert Aston was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Richard Bayly was examined by Draycot and Bayne and deprived. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

John Borsley the younger was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Agnes Foreman was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield on 12 September 1556. 1563, p. 1547, 1570, p. 2141 , 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1954.

Edward Hawkes was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

William Kaime was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Robert Katrenes was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Joyce Lewes was examined by Draycot and Bayne in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in October 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Robert Mossey was examined and deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Norris was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Anselm Sele was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Richard Slavy was deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Smith was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

Thomas Stiffe was examined and forced by Bayne and Draycot to do penance in the diocese of Coventry and Lichfield in September 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

John Waterhouse was examined and forced by Draycot and Bayne to do penance. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

William Taylor and Henry Tecka were deprived by Draycot and Bayne in 1556. 1563, p. 1548, 1570, p. 2141, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1955.

A citation to appear before the bishop was delivered to Joyce Lewes' husband, who furiously insisted that the summoner return it, lest he would force him to eat it, which he forced him to do at dagger-point. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Joyce Lewes and her husband were commanded to appear before the bishop. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

Although her husband submitted, Joyce Lewes refused. The bishop gave her one month's respite and returned her to her husband, who was bound to the sum of £100 to return her to submit at the end of one month. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

John Glover and others pleaded with Joyce Lewes' husband not to send her to the bishop and so forfeit the money but he refused. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

As Lewes took a drink, she said that she drank to all those who loved the gospel and desired the abolition of papistry. Several of the town's women drank from the same cup and were were examined by the bishop and his chancellor and later forced to do penance. 1563, p. 1619, 1570, p. 2207, 1576, p. 1904, 1583, p. 2012.

[Back to Top]

Ralph Bayne was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

Ralph Bayne died after Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Cox

(1500 - 1581)

Chaplain to Henry VIII, Archbishop Cranmer and Bishop Goodricke. Bishop of Ely (1559-1581). Exile during Mary's reign.[DNB]

Richard Cox was committed to the Marshalsea. 1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; and 1583, p. 1465.

A commission was sent to Kent to find out the truth about Cranmer's beliefs and the charges of heresy against him. The commission members were Dr Belhouse, Chauncellor Cox and Hussey the registrar. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1761, 1583, p. 1867.

During Careless' first examination, Martin claimed that Cox had refuted some of Careless' arguments. 1563, pp. 1529-35, 1570, pp. 2101-02.

Julins Palmer's first examination was by the mayor, with charges brought by Thomas Thackham (who had been in the teaching post that Palmer had taken). False witnesses against him were Cox, Cately and Downer. Foxe records the articles against him. 1570, pp. 2120-21, 1570, pp. 1842-43, 1583, pp. 1937-38.

[Back to Top]

Richard Cox was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

[Also referred to as 'D. Cockes']

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Horne

(1519 - 1580)

DD (1549). Dean of Winchester (1561). Dean of Durham (1551 - 1553: deprived. Restored 1559). Bishop of Winchester (1561 - 1580) (DNB; Garrett, Marian Exiles (Cambridge, 1938). Protestant exile under Mary. [Fines])

Robert Horn's exile is mentioned in Bradford's letter to the university town of Cambridge. 1563, pp. 1178-80, 1570, pp. 1808-09., 1576, p. 1545, 1583, p. 1627.

Foxe refers to Horne's installation as bishop of Winchester after Elizabeth's accession. 1583, p. 2128.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Watson

(1513 - 1584)

Chancellor of Cambridge University (from 25 September 1553); Master of St. John's (Cambridge) (from 28 September 1553); Dean of Durham (from 18 November 1553); Bishop of Lincoln (1557 - 1559) (DNB)

In the 1553 Convocation, Thomas Watson engaged in a long debate with James Haddon on the meaning of a passage in Theodoret, regarding the Eucharist (John Philpot, The trew report of the dysputacyon had and begonne in the convocacyon hows at London the XVIII day of Octobre MDLIIII, [Emden, 1554], STC 19890, sigs. C8v - D14; 1563, p. 912; 1570, p. 1576; 1576, p. 1344; 1583, p. 1414; also see Rerum, p. 227. Philpot's account, reprinted by Foxe, abridges this argument. It is given in BL Harley 422, fols. 38r - 40r, which was not printed by Foxe, but is printed in R. W. Dixon, A History of the Church of England (6 vols, London, (1884 - 1902), IV, pp. 81 - 85).

[Back to Top]

Watson, supported by Henry Morgan and John Harpsfield, debated with Richard Cheney on the Real Presence on the fifth day of the 1553 Convocation (1563, pp. 912-17; 1570, pp. 1576-1576 [recte 1577]; 1576, pp. 1344-45; and 1583, pp. 1415-16).

Watson was one of the official disputants in the Oxford disputations of 1554 (1563, pp. 932, 936-38, 973-76; 1570, pp. 1591-93 and 1618-21; 1576, p. 1358-59 and 1381-83; 1583, pp. 1428-30 and 1451-54).

[NB: A brief account of the Oxford disputations of 1554 mentions Watson's debating with Ridley (1563, p. 934; 1570, p. 1606; 1576, p. 1371; 1583, p. 1441).

In an attempt to reinstate catholicism at the University of Cambridge, a commission under the direction of Cardinal Pole ordered the condemning and burning of the bones and books of Phagius and Martin Bucer. Members of the commission were Cuthbert Scott, Nicholas Ormanet, Thomas Watson, John Christopherson and Henry Cole. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570]

[Back to Top]

On 20 August 1553, Watson preached a sermon at Paul's Cross where, to protect him from a potentially hostile crowd, he was guarded by two hundred soldiers (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

Thomas Watson was chosen by Pole to be a persecutor of the University of Cambridge. 1563, p. 1537, 1570, p. 2142, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1956.

Watson was sent to examine certain scholars at St John's College, Cambridge, on 9 January 1557. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2143, 1576, p. 1863, 1583, p. 1956.

He gave answer to an oration made by a fellow of Cambridge. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2143, 1576, p. 1863, 1583, p. 1956.

He thanked the fellows of Trinity College for their oration at the arrival of the commissioners. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2143, 1576, p. 1863, 1583, p. 1956.

The reformation of the University of Cambridge commanded by the queen's commissioners in 1557 was to take place at Watson's discretion. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1958.

Scot, Watson and Christopherson discussed and agreed to the exhumation of Bucer and Phagius. 1563, p. 1541, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1866, 1583, p. 1958.

Watson preached a sermon on Candlemas day. 1570, p. 2150, 1576, p. 1858, 1583, p. 1963.

Watson was present at the examination of John Rough and denounced him as a heretic. 1570, p. 2227, 1576, p. 1923, 1583, p. 2030.

Thomas Rose was imprisoned in the bishop of Lincoln's house in Holborn. 1576, p. 1978, 1583, p. 2083.

Watson was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

Watson was imprisoned in the Tower after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1993, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Whitehead

Thomas Whitehead was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Chedsey

(1510 - 1574?)

Of Somersetshire. Chaplain to Bishop Bonner. Archdeacon of Middlesex (1554 - 1559). President of Corpus Christi College, Oxford (1558 - 1559). [DNB; Fasti; Foster]

After the death of Edward VI Chedsey recanted and mutated his doctrine to his own purpose, as in his dispute with Peter Martyr.

Chedsey preached at Paul's Cross on 27 August 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

He argued with John Philpot in defence of transubstantiation in the 1553 convocation (1563, pp. 910-11; 1570, pp. 1574-75; 1576, p. 1342-3; and 1583, pp. 1413-14).

He was one of the catholic disputants in the Oxford disputations of 1554. He debated with Cranmer on the morning of Monday 16 April (1563, pp. 932-33, 939-43, 946-48, 951 and 954-55; 1570, pp. 1594-96, 1599-1600, 1602 and 1604-5; 1576, pp 1360-62, 1364-65, 1367 and 1369-70; 1583, pp. 1430-32, 1435-1436, 1437 and 1439-40).

[Back to Top]

When Chedsey addressed the lord mayor of London, he mentioned two letters- one from the queen and another from the privy council. The council letter was about procession and prayer at the agreement of peace between England and France. The signatories were: Francis Shrewsberye, Penbroke, Thomas Cheyny, William Peter, Thomas Wharton and Richard Southwell. Foxe suggests that he had seen the letter. 1563, p. 1217.

[Back to Top]

He published a declaration at Paul's Cross in May 1555. 1563, p. , 1570, p. , 1576, p. , 1583, p. .

Chedsey tried to persuade Hooper to recant after his condemnation on 29 January 1555. He was unsuccessful but false rumors circulated that Hooper had recanted. 1563, p. 1057; 1570, p. 1680; 1576, p. 1434; 1583, p. 1507.

He witnessed Bishop Bonner's burning Thomas Tomkins' hand with a candle. 1570, p. 1710; 1576, p. 1460; 1583, p. 1534.

In late June 1554, Chedsey discussed vernacular services and the adoration of the cross with Thomas Hawkes. The next day Chedsey preached in Bonner's chapel, extolling the saving power of the eucharist. 1563, pp. 1154-55; 1570, pp. 1763-64; 1576, p. 1506; 1583, p. 1589

Philpot's sixth examination was before the Lord Chamberlain to Queen Mary, Ferrars, Lord Rich, Lord St John, Lord Windsor, Lord Shandoys, Sir John Bridges, Chadsey and Bonner. 1563, pp. 1405-12, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

Philpot's seventh examination on 19 November 1555 was before Bonner, Rochester, chancellor of Lichfield, Chadsey and John Dee. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1702-05, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

During Philpot's ninth examination, Bonner called for John Harpsfield, who attended the session, to examine Philpot and Chadsey, who had however left for Westminster. 1563, pp. 1420-24, 1570, pp. 1983-85, 1576, pp. 1707-09, 1583, pp. 1815-16.

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

Philpot spoke with Worcester, Wright and Chadsey later the same day as his twelfth examination. 1570, pp. 1993-94, 1576, p. 1717, 1583, pp. 1823-24.

Later on the day of his thirteenth examination, Philpot spoke with John Harpsfield, Bonner and Chadsey. 1570, pp. 1996-97, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, pp. 1823-24.

The last examination of Philpot was on 16 December 1555 before Bonner and other bishops, including York, Chichester, Bath, John Harpsfield, Chadsey, Bonner, into which entered William Garret, knight, the lord mayor and the sheriff (Thomas Leigh) of London and Sir Martin Bowes, knight. 1563, p. 1441, 1570, pp. 1997-98, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1827.

[Back to Top]

Chedsey testified in the presence of Master Moseley and the lieutenant of the Tower that Bartlett Green had denied transubstantiation. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

A declaration was made at Paul's Cross by William Chedsey at Bonner's commandment. 1563, p. 1217.

Benold was examined before Chedsey, John Kingston, John Boswell, the two bailiffs of Colchester (Robert Brown and Robert Mainard) and several others on 23 June 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

Elizabeth Folkes was examined before Chedsey, John Kingston, John Boswell, the two bailiffs of Colchester (Robert Brown and Robert Mainard) and several others on 23 June 1557. Chedsey wept when the sentence of condemnation was read against her. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

[Back to Top]

When Alexander Wimshurst arrived at St Paul's, he saw Chedsey, his old acquaintance at Oxford, and said to him that he would rather be examined by Martin than by anyone else. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

William Wood was examined by Chedsey, Kenall and Robinson on 19 October 1554 in St Nicholas's church, Rochester. 1570, p. 2281, 1576, pp. 1969-70, 1583, p. 2077.

Chedsey was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

He sent a letter to Bonner dated 21 April 1558 [BL, Ms. Harley 416, fos.74r-v. Foxe describes the letter on 1570, p. 2301 et seq.]

[Foxe frequently refers to him as 'Chadsey'.]

2142 [2119]

Quene Mary. Conference or Disceptation had betwixt the Protestantes and the Papistes at Westminster.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.pray for your graces health and ancrease of honour.

This Oration of M. Hales beyng premised, now let vs prosecute, the Lord willing, that which we promised, concernyng the Disputation or Conference had at Westminster. The copy whereof here followeth.

The Conference or Disceptation had and begun at Westminster, the last of March, vpon certaine Questions or Articles of Religion proposed, and also of the breaking vp of the same, by the Papistes default, at the first beginning of Queene ELIZABETH. 
Commentary  *  Close

For background to Foxe's account of the Westminster cisputation see Norman Jones, Faith by Statute: Parliament and the Settlement of Religion, 1559 [London: 1982]. This account was printed in the 1563 edition, deleted from the 1570 and 1576 editions and reprinted in 1583.

 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 679, line 16

There is a printed account of this Conference in Lambeth library, which the Editor has collated, and finds to correspond, with the exception of a few verbal differences, to Foxe's large type: the Lambeth account, however, gives none of Foxe's small type, except the list of the disputants, and the three propositions in dispute. The title-page of the Lambeth copy is as follows:-
"The declaracyon of the procedynge of a conference, begon at Westminster the last of March, 1559, concerning certaine articles of religion, and the breaking up of the sayde conference by default and contempt of certayne Byshops, parties of the sayd conference.
(#8258;)
"Imprynted at London by Richarde Jugge and John Cawood prynters to the
Queen's Maiestie.
Cum privilegio Regiæ Maiestatis."

[Back to Top]

SO it pleased the Queenes most excellent maiestie, hauyng heard of diuersitie of opinions in certaine matters of religion amongst sundry of her louyng subiects, and beyng very desirous to haue the same reduced to some godly and Christian concord, by the aduise of the Lordes and others of the priuy Counsaile, as well for the satisfaction of persons doubtfull, as also for the knowledge of the very truth in certaine matters of difference, to haue a conuenient chosen number of the best learned of eyther part, and to conferre together their opinions and reasons, and thereby to come to some good and charitable agreement. And hereuppon by her Maiesties commaundement, certaine of her priuy Counsaile declared this purpose to the Archbishoppe of Yorke (beyng also one of the same priuy Counsaile) and required hym that he would imparte the same to some of the Bishops, and to make choise of viij. ix. or x. of them, and that there should be the like number named of the other part. And further also declared to hym (as then was supposed) what the matter should be. And as for the tyme, it was thought meet to be as soone as possible might be agreed vpon. And then after certaine dayes past, it was signified by the sayd Archbishoppe, that there was appointed by such of the Bishops, to whome hee had imparted this matter eight persons, that is to say, 4. Bishops and 4. Doctours. The names of whom here follow vnder written. &c.

[Back to Top]

The Papistes. The Protestants.
The B. of Winchest.
The B. of Lich.
The B. of Chest.
The B. of Carlile.
The B. of Linc.
D. Cole.
D. Harpsfield.
D. Langdale.
D. Chedsey.
D. Scory B. of Chich.
D. Coxe.
M. Whitehed.
M Grindall.
M Horne.
M Doct. Sands.  
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 679, fn 1

The bishop of Carlisle and Dr. Sandys, though probably present, took no part in the conference. See Strype on this question. Annals, vol. i. chap. v. - ED.


M. Gest.
M. Ælmer.  
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 679, line 2 from the bottom

The Lambeth copy reads "Aylmer."


M. Iuell.

Who were content at the Queenes Maiesties commaundement, to shewe their opinions, and as the sayde Archbishop termed it, render accompte of their fayth in those matters which were mentioned and that especially in writyng, although he sayd, they thought the same so determined, as there was no cause to dispute vppon them. The matter which they should talke vpon, was comprehended in these three propositions, here vnder specified.

[Back to Top]

1.
 
 
 
It is agaynst the worde of God, and the custome of the
auncient Church, to vse a tongue vnknowen to the
people, in common prayer, and the administration of
the Sacraments.

2.
 
 
Euery Church hath authoritie to appointe, take away,
and change ceremonies and Ecclesiasticall rites, so
the same be to edification.

3.
 
 
It cannot be prooued by the worde of God, that there is
in the Masse offered vp a sacrifice prepitiatorie for
the quicke and the dead.

It was hereupon fully resolued by the Queenes maiestie, with the aduise aforesayd, that according to their desire, it should be in writing on both partes, for auoyding of much alteration in wordes, and that the sayd Bishops should, because they were in authoritie of degree superiours, first declare their myndes and opinions to the matter, with their reasons in writyng. And the other number beyng also viij. men of good degree in schooles, and some

[Back to Top]

hauyng bene in dignitie in the church of England, if they had any thing to say to þe contrary, should the same day declare their opinions in lyke manner, and so eche of them should deliuer their writings to the other, to bee considered what were to bee improoued therein, and the same to declare agayne in writyng at some other conuenient day, and the like order to bee kept in all the rest of the matters. All this was fully agreed vpon with the Archb. of Yorke, and so also signified to both parties.

[Back to Top]

And immediately hereupon, diuers of the Nobilitie and states of the realme vnderstanding that such a meting and conference shoulde bee, and that in certaine matters whereupon the Courte of Parliament consequently followyng, some lawes might be grounded. They made ernest meanes to her Maiestie, that the parties of this conference, might put and read their assertions in the English tongue, and that in the presence of them of the Nobilitie and others of her Parliament house, for the better satisfaction and enabling of their owne iudgements, to treat and conclude of such lawes as might depend hereupon.

[Back to Top]

This also beyng thought very reasonable, was signified to both parties and so fully agreed vpon, and the daye appoynted for the first meetyng, to bee the Friday in the forenoone, beyng the last of March, at Westminster church. At which foresayd day and place, both for good order & for honour of the conference by the Queenes maiesties commandement, the Lordes and others of the priuy counsaile were present, and a great parte of the nobilitie also: And notwithstanding this former order appoynted, and consented vnto by both partes, yet the Bishop of Winchester & his Colleagues alledging they had mistaken þt their assertions and reasons should be written, so onely recited out of the booke, sayd their booke was not ready then written, but they were ready to argue and dispute, and therefore they would for that tyme repeate in speache that which they had to say to the first probation. 

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 680, last line but one

For "proposition," which the Lambeth copy reads, Foxe's text reads corruptly "probation."

[Back to Top]

This variation from the former order, and specially from that which themselues had by the sayde Archbishop in writyng before required, adding thereto the reason of the Apostle, that to contend with wordes, is profitable to nothyng, but to subuersion of the hearer, seemed to the Queenes maiesties counsaile somewhat strange, and yet was it permitted without any great reprehension, because they excused themselues with mistakyng the order, and agreed that they would not faile but put it in writing and accordyng to the former order, deliuer it to the other part, and so the sayd Bishop of Winchester and hys Colleagues, appoynted Doctour Cole Deane of Paules, to be the vtterer of their myndes, who partly by speech onely, and partly by readyng of authorities written, and at certaine tymes beyng enformed of his Colleagues, what to say made a declaration of their meanynges and their reasons to their first proposition, which being ended, they were asked by the priuy Counsaile if any of them had any more to be sayd, and they sayd no. So as the other parte was licenced to shewe their myndes, which they dyd accordyng to the first order, exhibityng all that whiche they ment to be propounded, in a booke written, which after a prayer and inuocation made most humbly to almightye God for the enduyng of them with his holy spirite, and a protestation also to stand to the doctrine of the Catholike Church builded vpon the Scriptures, and the doctrine of the Prophets and the Apostles, was distinctly red by one Robert Horne Bacheler in Diuinitie, late Deane of Duresme, and after Bishoppe of Winchester.  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 681, line 23

The Lambeth coppy has not the words, "and afterwards Bishop of Winchester."

The Copye of which their Protestation here followeth, accordyng as it was by him penned and exhibited, with their preface also before the same, as is here expressed.

[Back to Top]

FOrasmuch as it is thought good vnto the Queenes most excellent Maiesty (vnto whom in the Lord all obedience is due) that we should declare our iudgement in writyng vpon certaine propositions: we, as becommeth vs to doe herein, most gladly obey.

Seeyng that Christ is our onely maister, whome the father hath commaunded vs to heare: and seyng also hys worde is the truth, from the which it is not lawfull for vs to depart not one haire bredth, and against the which (as the Apostle saith) we can do nothing, we doe in all thinges submitte our selues vnto this truth, and doe protest that we will affirme nothyng agaynst the same.

[Back to Top]

And forasmuch as we haue for our mother the true and catholike Church of Christ, which is grounded vpon the doctrine of the Apostles and Prophetes, and is of Christ the head in all things gouerned, we do reuerence her iudgement, we obey her authoritie as becommeth children: and we do deuoutly professe and in all points follow the faith which is conteined in the three Creedes, that is to say, of the Apostles, of the Councell of Nice,

[Back to Top]
and
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield