Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
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2145 [2122]

Queene Mary. Disputation holden at Westminster, betweene the Papists and Protestants.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.enim dicitur, ignorat. 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
St. Jerome, on I Corinthians, 14 (13). 2. (?)
Foxe text Latin


Nam si orare lingua. &c.
Hoc dicit, quoniam si quis incognitis aliis linguis loquatur, mens eius non ipsi efficitur sine fructu, sed audienti. Quicquid enim dicitur, ignorat.

Foxe text translation

[This is Paules meanyng, sayth Hierome.] If any man speaketh in strange & vnknown tongs, his mynd is not to hymselfe without fruit and profite, but he is not profited that heareth hym.

Actual text of Jerome

Not apparently a direct quotation from I Corinthians, 14. 2.

Nothing found in search of Migne. See note on Page 2120, Column 2, Line 64 above.

This is Paules meanyng, saith Hierome. If any man speaketh in strange & vnknown tongs his mynd is not to hymselfe without fruit and profite, but he is not profited that heareth hym.

And in the end of his commentary vpon the Epistle to the Galathians,  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 685, line 11 from the bottom

But this quotation, it should be observed, is made from the larger genuine commentary upon this Epistle: the two former being taken from the short comment upon the Thirteen Epistles of Paul, which all agree was not of Jerome's writing. See Rivet's Crit. Sac. lib. iv. 5; Oudin. De Scripp. Eccles. i. 845; Labbe in Bellarmin. de Scripp. Eccles. p. 110, Edit. Venet. 1728.

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he saith thus:

Quod autem (Amen) consensum significet audientis, &c. 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
St. Jerome, on Paul, Galatians. 18.
Foxe text Latin

Quod autem (Amen) consensum significet audientis, &c.

Foxe text translation

That (Amen) signifieth the consent of the hearer,etc.

Actual text of Jerome, lib. 3. ad Gal Migne, P.L. vol. 026. Col. 0438C

Quod autem Amen consensum significet audientis, etc.

[Accurate citation]

That (Amen) signifieth the consent of the hearer, and is the sealing vp of the truth, Paul in the first Epistle to the Corinths, teacheth, saying. But if thou shalt blesse in spirit, who supplieth the place of the ignorant? How shall he at thy prayer aunswere (Amen) seeyng he knoweth not what thou sayst? Wherby he declareth, that the vnlearned man cannot aunswer, that that which is spoken, is true, vnlesse he vnderstand what is sayd.

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The same Hierome sayth in the Preface  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 685, line 3 from the bottom

In the second however; tom. vi. p. 133, edit. 1616.

of S. Pauls Epistle to the Galathians, that the noyse of (Amen) soundeth in the Romane church like an heauenly thunder.

As Hierome compareth this sound of common praier to thunder, so compareth MarginaliaBasil. ho. 4. hexam.Basill it to the sound of þe sea, in these words: If the sea be faire, how is not the assembly of the congregation much fairer, in the which a ioyned sound of men, women and childrē, as it were of the waues beatyng on the shore, is sent forth in our praiers vnto our God.

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MarginaliaChrisostome in i. ad Cor. cap. 14.Cum populus semel audiuit, εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας τῶν αἰῶνων,, statim omnes respondent Amen. 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Chrysostom, on I ad Cor. cap. xiv
Foxe text Latin and Greek

Cum populus semel audiuit, εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας τῶν αἰῶνων, statim omnes respondent, Amen.

Foxe text translation

When the people once heare these wordes (world without end) they all forthwith answer, Amen.

When the people once heare these wordes (world without end) they all forthwith answer, Amen.

And the same writer vpon the same chapter, vppon these words: How shall hee that occupieth the roume of the vnlearned: say Amen. MarginaliaIdem eodem loco, in illa verba si ingrediatur infidelis, aut indoctus. 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Chrysostom on Paul, I Cor. xiv, 16
Foxe text Latin

[Marginal Note: Idem eodem loco, in illa verba si ingrediatur infidelis, aut indoctus] En rursus amussi (quod dicitur) saxum applicat, ecclesiae aedificationem vbique requirens, etc.

Foxe text translation


[Marginal Note:And the same writer vpon the same chapter, vppon these words: How shall hee that occupieth the roume of the vnlearned: say Amen]
Behold againe, he applieth the stone vnto the squire (as the Prouerbe is) requiring the edifieng of the Congregation in all places.

En rursus amussi (quod dicitur) saxum applicat, ecclesiæ ædificationem vbiq; requirens. &c. 
Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Chrysostom on Paul, I Cor. xiv, 16
Foxe text Latin

[Marginal Note: Idem eodem loco, in illa verba si ingrediatur infidelis, aut indoctus] En rursus amussi (quod dicitur) saxum applicat, ecclesiae aedificationem vbique requirens, etc.

Foxe text translation


[Marginal Note:And the same writer vpon the same chapter, vppon these words: How shall hee that occupieth the roume of the vnlearned: say Amen]
Behold againe, he applieth the stone vnto the squire (as the Prouerbe is) requiring the edifieng of the Congregation in all places.

Behold againe, he applieth the stone vnto the squire (as the Prouerbe is) requiring the edifieng of the Congregation in all places. The vnlearned he calleth the common people, and sheweth that it is no small discommoditie, if they cannot say, Amen.

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MarginaliaAn other argument out of Chrisostome.And agayne the same Chrysostome: Quin & in precibus viderit quis populum multum simul offerre, tum pro energumenis, tum pro pœnitentibus. 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Chrysostom
Foxe text Latin

Quin & in precibus viderit quis populum multum simul offerre, tum pro energumenis, tum pro paenitentibus. Communes enim preces & a sacerdote & ab illis fiunt, & omnes dicunt vnam orationem, orationem misericordia plenam. Iterum, vbi excluserimus a sacerdotalibus ambitibus eos qui non possunt esse participes sanctae mensae, alia facienda est oratio, et omnes similiter surgimus.

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Foxe text translation

Yea in the prayers you may see the people offer largely, both for the possessed and the penitents. For the Priestes and the people pray altogether commonly, and all one prayer, a prayer full of mercy and pity. And excluding out of the Priests limites all such as cannot bee pertakers of the holy table, another prayer must be made, [and all after one sort lye downe vppon the earth,] and all agayne after one sort ryse vp together.

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Actual text of Chrysostom II ad Cor. Hom. 18. § 3.

Communes enim preces & a sacerdote & ab illis fiūt, & omnes dicunt vnā orationē, orationē misericordia plenam. Iterum, vbi excluserimus a sacerdotalibus ambitibus eos qui non possunt esse participes sanctæ mensæ, alia facienda est oratio, & omnes similiter surgimus, &c. 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 686, fn 2

[See Chrysost. inEpist. ad Cor. 2. Hom. 18. ¶ 3. - ED.]

That is, yea in the prayers you may see the people offer largely, both for the possessed and the penitents. For the Priestes and the people pray altogether commonly, and all one prayer, a prayer full of mercy and pity. And excluding out of the Priests limites all such as cannot bee pertakers of the holy table, another prayer must be made, and all after one sort lye downe vppon the earth, and all agayne after one sort ryse vp together. Now when the peace is geuen, we all in lyke maner salute one another, and the Priest in the reuerent mysteries wisheth well to the people, and the people vnto hym, for Et cum spiritu tuo 
Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Foxe text narrative.
Foxe text Latin

Et cum spiritu tuo.

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

Translation (Wade 2004)

And with thy spirit.

is nothing els but this. All things that belong to the sacrament of thanksgeuing, is common to all. But he geueth not thanks alone, but all the people with hym.

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Hereby it may appeare, that not the priest alone communicated nor prayed alone, nor had any peculiar prayer, but such as was common to them all, such as they all vnderstood, & all were able to say with the priest, which could not haue bene, if he had vsed a straunge tong in the ministration of the sacraments.

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MarginaliaDionisius.Dionysius describing the maner of the ministration of the Lordes supper, sayth: That hymnes were said of the whole multitude of the people.

MarginaliaCiprianus ser. 6. de or. dominica.Cyprian sayth: The priest doth prepare the myndes of the brethren, with a preface before the prayer, saying: Lift vp your hartes, that whilcs the people doth aunswer, we haue our hartes lifted vp to the Lord, they may be admonished that they ought to thinke of none other thing then of the Lord.

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MarginaliaAug. in Psal. 18.S. Augustine, Quid hoc sit, intelligere debemus, &c. 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
St. Augustine, Enarratio ii. sermo ad plebem.
Foxe text Latin

Quid hoc sit, intelligere debemus. etc.

Foxe text translation

What this should be we ought to vnderstand:

Actual text of St. Augustine, Enarratio ii. sermo ad plebem. Migne, P.L. Vol. 036. Col. 0157

quid hoc sit intelligere debemus, etc.

[Possibly just being used by Foxe as a suitable phrase remembered from his reading of St. Augustine for his current context in I Corinthians]

What this should be we ought to vnderstand, that we may sing with reason of man, not with chatting of birdes. For Ousels and Popiniayes, and Rauens, and Pies, & other such like birds are taught by mē to prate they know not what. But to sing with vnderstanding, is geuen by Gods holy will to the nature of man.

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MarginaliaAug. de magist.The same Augustine. There needeth no speach when we pray, sauing perhaps as the priestes doe, for to declare their meanyng, not that God, but that men maye heare them, and so being put in remembraunce by consentyng with the priest, may hang vpon God.

To these testimonies of the auncient writers, we will

ioyne one constitution of Iustinian  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 686, fn 6

See "Novellæ Constitutiones;" Constit. 123, p. 409. 4to. Basil. 1561. - ED. Appendix:It is to be observed that there is much discrepancy between the different copies of this Constitution, in the original as well as in the Latin translation. In the Edition by H. Scrimger (1558) a whole page is left out, containing, amongst other matters, the passage to which Jewel refers, and which is found in the Greek Edition of Haloander. (Note on Jewel's Replie to Harding, Art. iii.; Works, Edit. Oxf. 1848, vol. ii. 43.) See also Taylor's "Dissuasive from Popery," part. i. ch. i. ¶ 7, which informs us that "this law was rased out of the Latin versions of Justinian. The fraud and design was too palpable: but it prevailed nothing, for it is acknowledged by Cassander and Bellarmine, and is in the Greek copies of Haloander (De Missa, l. 2, c. 13, sect. ad Novellam)." In modern Editions of the Civil Law this paragraph is transferred to Novell. 137, ¶ 6.

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the Emperour, who lyued 527. yeares after Christ: Iubemus vt omnes Episcopi pariter & Præsbyteri. &c.  
Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Justinian
Foxe text Latin

Iubemus vt omnes Episcopi pariter et Praesbiteri. &c.

Foxe text translation

We commaund that all bishops & priests [do celebrate the holy oblation and the praiers vsed in holy baptisme,etc.]

MarginaliaNouel. const. 113.We commaund that all bishops & priests do celebate the holy oblation, and the praiers vsed in holy Baptisme, not speaking low, but with a cleare or loud voyce, which may be heard of the people, that thereby the mynd of the hearers may bee stirred vp with greater deuotion, in vttering the prayses of the Lord God. For so the holy Apostle teacheth in his first Epistle to the Corinthians, saying: Truly if thou onely blesse or geue thanks in spirit, how doth he which occupieth the place of the vnlearned, say the Amen, at the geuing of thanks vnto god? for he vnderstandeth not what thou sayest. Thou verily geuest thanks wel, but another is not edified. And again, in the Epistle to the Romains he sayth: Corde creditur ad iustitiam, ore autem fit confessio ad salutem, 
Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Foxe text narrative citing Romans, 10. 10.
Foxe text Latin

Corde creditur ad iustitiam, ore autem fit confessio ad salutem.

Foxe text translation

With the heart a man beleeueth vnto righteousnesse, and with the mouth confession is made vnto saluation.

Actual text of Romans, 10. 10 (Vulgate)

corde enim creditur ad iustitiam ore autem confessio fit in salutem

[Accurate citation]

with the heart a man beleeueth vnto righteousnesse, and with the mouth confession is made vnto saluation.

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Therfore for these causes it is conuenient, that amōgst other prayers, those thinges also which are spoken in the holy oblation, be vttered and spoken of the most religious bishops and priests vnto our Lord Iesus Christ our God with the father and the holy Ghost, with a lowde voyce. And let the most religious priests know this, that if they neglect any of these things in þe dreadful iudgement of the great God and our sauiour Iesus Christ, neither will we when we know it, rest, and leaue it vnreuenged.

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¶ Out of this constitution of Iustinian the Emperour, three things are worthy to be noted.

First, that the common prayer and ministration done with a lowd voyce, so as may be heard and vnderstanded of the people, is a meane to stirre vp deuotion in the people, contrary to the common assertion of Eckius & other aduersaries, who affirme that ignorance maketh a great admiration and deuotion.

Secondly, that Iustinian maketh this matter of not ordering common ministration and prayers, so as it may be vnderstanded of the people, not a matter of indifferencie, but such a thyng as must be answered for at the day of iudgement.

Thirdly, that this Emperour beyng a christian Emperor, doth not onely make constitution of Ecclesiasticall matters, but also threateneth reuenge and sharpe punishment to the violaters of the same.

These are sufficient to prooue, that it is agaynst Gods word, and the vse of the primitiue church, to vse a lāguage not vnderstanded of the people, in common prayer & ministration of the sacraments. Wherfore it is to be meruailed at, not onely how such an vntruth and abuse crept at the first into the Church, but also how it is maintayned so stifly at this day, and vpon what ground these that will be thought guides and pastors of Christes church, are so loth to returne to the first orginall of S. Pauls doctrine, & the practise of the primitiue catholike Church of Christ.

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The God of pacience and consolation, geue vs grace to bee lyke mynded one towardes another in Christ Iesu, that we all agreeyng together, may with one mouth prayse God the father of our Lorde Iesus Christ, Amen.

Iohn Scory.
Rich. Coxe.
Dauid Whitehead.
Edmund Grindall.
Iohn Iewel.
Rob. Horne.
Iohn Ælmer.
Edmund Gest.

And the same beyng ended with some likelyhood as it seemed, that the same was much allowable to the audiēce: certaine of the Bishops began to say contrary to their former aunswer, that they had now much more to say to this matter, wherein although they might haue bene well reprehended for such maner of cauillation: yet for auoidyng of any more mistakyng of orders in this colloquy or conference, and for that they should vtter all that which they had to say, it was both ordered & thus openly agreed vpō of both partes in the full audience, that vpon the monday folowing, the bishops should bring their minds & reasons in writyng to the second assertion, and the last also if they could, and first read the same: and that done, the other part should bring likewise theirs to the same. And beyng red, ech of them should deliuer to other the same writings. And in the meane tyme, the Bishops should put in writyng, not onely all that which D. Cole had that day vttered, but al such other matters as they any otherwise could thinke of for the same, and as soone as they might possible,

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