Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesLatin/Greek TranslationsCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Anne Askew

(1521 - 1546)

Martyr. Second daughter of Sit William Askew of Lincolnshire. [DNB]

Anne Askew was described as a faithful witness of Christ by Robert Glover in a letter to his wife.1563, pp. 1273-80, 1570, pp. 1886-89, 1576, pp. 1615-19, 1583, p. 1710.

In a letter to certain godly women, William Tyms asked them to remember the blessed Anne Askew and her example. 1570, p. 2078, 1576, p. 1792, 1583, pp. 1898-99.

Thomas Fairfax and Richard Wilmot were tormented around the same time as Anne Askew. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

 
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Edward Crome

(d. 1562)

Rector of St Mary, Aldermary, London. [DNB]

Edward Crome was sent to the Fleet on 13 January 1554 by the privy council for preaching without a licence (1583, p. 1418; APC IV, p.384).

Another notice that Crome was committed to the Fleet on 13 January 1554 (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; and 1583, p. 1467).

Ridley reported to Cranmer, in a letter written in the aftermath of the Oxford disputations in April 1554, that Crome, Rogers and Bradford would be taken to Cambridge for a disputation on similar lines to that held in Oxford (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; and 1583, p. 1464).

Crome was a signatory to the letter of 8 May 1554 protesting the proposed disputation at Cambridge. The letter is printed in 1563, pp. 1001-3; 1570, pp. 1639-41; 1576, pp. 1399-1400; 1583, pp. 1469-71.

Ridley praised the piety, integrity and constancy of 'D.C.' in a letter he wrote to Hooper, probably in 1554. 1563, pp. 1051-52; 1570, p. 1677; 1576, p. 1404; 1583, pp. 1504-5. [NB: Only the initials 'D.C.' are given in Foxe's version of the letter, but the name 'Doctor Crome' is given in the version of the letter printed in Letters of the Martyrs, p. 46.]

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Crome was brought before Stephen Gardiner at St Mary Overy's on 30 January 1555. He asked for two months to consider whether he would or would not recant and this was granted to him (1570, p. 1655; 1576, p. 1412; 1583, p. 1483). [Taken from BL Harley MS 421, fols. 43r and 45r].

A copy of one of Crome's recantations was given to George Marsh in an attempt to persuade Marsh to recant. 1570, p. 1733; 1576, p. 1480; 1583, p. 1563.

Bradford was asked by Heath and Day to read a book that had done Dr Crome good. 1563, p. 1208, 1570, p. 1797, 1576, 1524, 1583, p. 1617.

A letter from Ridley and his fellow prisoners to Bradford and his fellow prisoners in the King's Bench in 1554 stated that Ridley longed to hear of Father Crome, Doctor Sandys, Masters Saunders, Veron, Beacon and Rogers. 1563, p. 1294, 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1624, 1583, p. 1724.

Foxe refers to Edward Crome's first recantation. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

Master Tracy secretly took a letter to William Plane and asked him to take it to Crome. Someone read the letter while Plane was out of the house and believed Plane to be the author of its defamatory contents. Plane was sent to the Tower. 1583, p. 2128.

[Also referred to as 'D. C.']

 
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Guildford Dudley

(d. 1554)

Husband of Lady Jane Grey and fourth son of Northumberland (DNB)

Guildford Dudley married Lady Jane Grey (1563, p 901; 1570, p. 1567; 1576, p. 1336; and 1583, p. 1406; cf. the darker version of this marriage given in Rerum, p. 232, where Guildford Dudley is not named).

He was imprisoned in the Tower for nearly five months after Mary became queen (1563, p. 902; 1570, p. 1569; 1576, p. 1338; and 1583, p. 1407).

He was executed on 12 February 1554, the same day as Jane Grey; Foxe calls him and his wife 'innocentes' (1563, p. 923; 1570, p. 1585; 1576, p. 1352; and 1583, p. 1423). [His execution is not mentioned in the Rerum.]

Foxe again relates that Lady Jane Grey and her husband were beheaded. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

Another mention of Dudley's execution is in 1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1467.

Foxe refers to Guildford Dudley's marriage to Jane Grey. 1583, p. 2128.

[Also referred to as 'Lord Gildford']

 
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Lady Anne Wharton

Lady Anne Wharton curtsied to a statue of the Virgin Mary and Jane Grey rebuked her for it. Her comments were said to have lost her Queen Mary's favour. 1583, p. 2128.

[Wife of Thomas Wharton (1520 - 1572), privy councillor (1553 - 1558) (Bindoff)]

 
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Lady Jane Grey

(1537 - 1554) (DNB)

Eldest surviving daughter of Henry Grey, marquis of Dorset and later duke of Suffolk. [DNB]

Foxe states that at his death, Edward VI bequeathed the throne to Lady Jane. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1870.

Jane Grey was named by Edward VI as his heir and proclaimed queen (1563, p. 901; 1570, p. 1567; 1576, p. 1336; 1583, p. 1406).

She was compared favorably to Edward VI in learning; she was also compared to Aspasia, Sempronia and the mother of the Gracchi (1563, p. 901; 1570, p. 1576; 1576, p. 1336; and 1583, p. 1406).

Cranmer refused to swear allegience to Lady Jane. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, pp. 2045-46, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1870.

The dukes of Northumberland and Suffolk were executed for their support of Lady Jane. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

She was imprisoned in the Tower for nearly five months after Mary became queen (1563, p. 902; 1570, p. 1569; 1576, p. 1338; 1583, p. 1407).

Jane Grey's writings and letters (1563, pp. 917-22; 1570, pp. 1580-84; 1576, pp. 1348-52; 1583, pp. 1420-22).

Jane was executed 12 February 1554 (1563, p 823; 1570, p. 1584; 1576, p. 1352; 1583, p. 1422).

Lady Jane and her husband were beheaded. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

Jane Grey's words at her execution and a description of her execution are in 1563, p. 919; 1570, p. 1584; 1576, p. 1352; and 1583, p. 1422.

Latin verses written by Jane Grey are in 1563, p. 922; 1570, p. 1584; 1576, p. 1352; and 1583, pp. 1422-23).

Latin verses commemorating Jane Grey (by John Parkhust, John Foxe and Laurence Humphrey) are in 1563, pp. 923; 1570, pp. 1584-85; 1576, p. 1352; and 1583, p. 1423.

Foxe refers to Lady Jane Grey's marriage to Sir Guildford Dudley. 1583, p. 2128.

Lady Anne Wharton curtsied to a statue of the Virgin Mary and Jane Grey rebuked her for it. 1563, p. 1730, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2128.

[Also referred to as 'Jane Dudley']

 
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Mr Tracy

Of London.

Master Tracy secretly took a letter to William Plane and asked him to take it to Crome. Someone read the letter while Plane was out of the house and believed Plane to be the author of its defamatory contents. Plane was sent to the Tower. 1563, p. 1737, 1583, p. 2128.

Plane was racked and tortured in the Tower but refused to reveal that Tracy had written the letter. 1563, p. 1737, 1583, p. 2128.

Tracy never enquired as to the welfare of Plane's family after his death. 1563, p. 1737, 1583, p. 2128.

 
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Nicholas Ridley

(d. 1555) (DNB)

Bishop of London (1550 - 1553). Martyr. [DNB]

Nicholas Ridley gave John Rogers a prebend in St Paul's (1563, p. 1023; 1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1484).

He led the bishops who compelled John Hooper to wear vestments at his consecration. Ridley wrote a letter to Hooper apologising for this in Mary's reign (1563, pp. 1050-2; 1570, pp. 1676-7; 1576, p. 1404; 1583, pp. 1504-5).

He preached a sermon at Paul's Cross, at the behest of the privy council, supporting Jane Grey's claim to the throne. After Mary's accession Ridley visited the queen at Framlingham and was arrested (1563, p. 903; 1570, p. 1569; 1576, p. 1338; and 1583, p. 1408).

He was engaged, over dinner with John Feckenham and Sir John Bourne, in a debate on the nature of the eucharist. An account of the debate, 'penned with his own hand,' is first printed in 1563, (1563, pp. 928-31; 1570, pp. 1589-91; 1576, pp. 1356-58; and 1583, pp. 1426-28). There is no earlier printed version or manuscript of the exchange.

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Ridley was examined by Weston and the other members of the catholic delegation to the Oxford disputations on Saturday 14 April 1554 (1563, p. 933 and 937-38; 1570, p. 1593; 1576, p. 1935 [recte 1359]; 1583, pp. 1429-30).

[NB: There is a summary of Ridley's disputation on Tuesday 17 April 1554 which was printed in its entirety only in 1563, pp 933-34].

Ridley disputed with Richard Smith and the other catholic doctors on 17 April 1554 (1563, p. 957-78; 1570, pp. 1606-22; 1576, pp. 1370-84; 1583, pp. 1441-54).

Ridley's preface to his account of the disputation is 1563, pp. 956-57 and (in a differently worded version) 1570, p. 1632; 1576, pp. 1392-93; 1583, p. 1463.

Ridley's conclusion to his account of the Oxford disputations is printed (only) in 1563, p. 978.

Ridley wrote to Weston protesting the conduct of the 1554 Oxford disputations and demanding that Ridley's written responses to the three propositions be shown to the higher house of convocation (1563, p. 977; 1570, p. 1633; 1576, pp. 1393-94; 1583, p. 1464).

The queen's letter ordering Ridley, together with Cranmer and Latimer, to be held in the custody of the mayor and bailiffs of Oxford during the disputation is printed in 1563, p. 999.

He was summoned, together with Cranmer and Latimer, before Weston and the commissioners on 20 April 1554. He refused to recant what he had said during the disputations. He was condemned and taken to the sheriff's house (1563, pp. 935-38; 1570, pp. 1632-33; 1576, p. 1393; 1583, pp. 1463-64).

On 21 April 1554, Ridley was compelled to observe, having been brought from the sheriff's house, a procession in which Weston carried the sacrament and four doctors carried a canopy over Weston (1563, p. 936; 1570, p. 1633; 1576, p. 1393; 1583, p. 1464).

Ridley wrote a letter to Cranmer, which was sent together with copies of his account of the disputation and news of recent developments (1570, pp. 1633-34; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, pp. 1464).

Foxe mentions Ridley's condemnation and disputation in passing in 1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469.

In a letter of 10 October 1554, Heinrich Bullinger asked John Hooper to pass his commendations toRidley, Hugh Latimer and Thomas Cranmer (1570, p. 1692; 1576, pp. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518).

Ridley was one of the authors of a petition to Philip and Mary asking them for a chance to defend, in public debate, the Edwardian religious reforms (1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1483).

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Ridley, Thomas Cranmer and Hugh Latimer from the Marshalsea(1563, pp. 1042-43; 1570, pp. 1667-68; 1576, pp. 1422-23; 1583, pp. 1496-97).

Foxe describes Ridley's character. 1563, p. 1283, 1570, p. 1895, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

John Bradford was persuaded to enter the ministry by Ridley. Ridley called Bradford to take the position of deacon and, at Bradford's willing, ordered him deacon. 1563, p. 1173, 1570, p. 1780, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, pp. 1603-04.

He led the bishops who compelled John Hooper to wear vestments at his consecration. Ridley wrote a letter to Hooper apologising for this in Mary's reign. 1563, pp. 1050-2; 1570, pp. 1676-7; 1576, p. 1404; 1583, pp. 1504-5.

In a letter of 10 October 1554, Heinrich Bullinger asked John Hooper to pass his commendations to Ridley, Hugh Latimer and Thomas Cranmer. 1570, p. 1692; 1576, pp. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518.

Ridley was one of the authors of a petition to Philip and Mary asking them for a chance to defend, in public debate, the Edwardian religious reforms. 1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1483.

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Ridley, Thomas Cranmer and Hugh Latimer from the Marshalsea.1563, pp. 1042-43; 1570, pp. 1667-68; 1576, pp. 1422-23; 1583, pp. 1496-97.

During Bradford's second examination, Doctor Seton described Ridley and Latimer as being unable to answer anything at all at their examinations. 1570, p. 1786, 1576, p. 1526, 1583, p. 1607.

John Bradford sent a letter to Cranmer, Latimer and Ridley. 1570, p. 1815 1576, p. 1551, 1583, p. 1634.

Rowland Taylor wrote a letter to Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer when they were prisoners in Oxford. 1570, p. 2072; 1576, p. 1787; 1583, p. 1893.

Foxe recounts the life of Ridley. 1563, pp. 1283-96, 1570, pp. 1895-96, 1576, pp. 1623-24, 1583, pp. 1717-30.

Ridley was kind to Heath, archbishop of York during Edward VI's reign. 1563, p. 1285, 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

Ridley was kind to Edmund Bonner's mother. She would dine at Ridley's manor in Fulham with Ridley and Mistress Mungey, Bonner's sister. 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

Ridley's sister and her husband, George Shipside, were also kind to Bonner's mother and sister. 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, pp. 1717-18.

Ridley was converted through the reading of Bertram's Book of the Sacrament, and confirmed in his beliefs through conference with Cranmer and Peter Martyr. 1563, p. 1285, 1570, p. 1895, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

After Mary's accession, Ridley was kept first in the Tower, then in the Bocardo in Oxford, and then held in custody at Master Irish's house until his death. 1563, p. 1285, 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1624, 1583, p. 1717.

Ridley was cast into Bocardo prison with Hugh Latimer. 1563, p. 1285, 1583, p. 1718.

A conference took place between Ridley and Latimer in prison on the objections of Antonian, in other words, those of a popish persecutor, such as Winchester. 1563, pp. 1285-94, 1583, pp. 1718-24.

Letters of Ridley. 1570, pp. 1896-1902, 1576, pp. 1624-30, 1583, pp. 1724-30.

A letter was sent by Ridley to West, in which Ridley asked West and also Dr Harvey to remember their promises to him. Foxe also includes West's letter and Ridley's response. 1570, pp. 1900-01, 1576, pp. 1627-28, 1583, pp. 1728-29.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. He mentioned his imprisonment with Cranmer, Latimer and Bradford. He mentioned that he knew that Ferrar, Hooper, Rogers, Taylor of Hadleigh, Saunders and Tomkins, a weaver, had all been martyred, as had Cardmaker the day before he wrote this letter. He had heard that West had relented, and Grimald been cast into the Marshalsea. He had also heard that Thomas Ridley, of the Bull-head in Cheapside, had died. He had heard that his brother-in-law, Shipside, had spent much time in prison but was now released. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

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The examination of Ridley and Latimer by White (Lincoln) and Brookes (Gloucester) took place on 30 September 1555. White and Brookes received their commission from Cardinal Poole. 1563, pp. 1297-98, 1570, pp. 1903-09, 1576, pp. 1631-39, 1583, pp. 1757-60.

A communication took place between Ridley and Brookes in Irish's house on 15 October, on which day he was degraded, and at which Edridge ('reader then of the Greek lecture') was present.. 1563, pp. 1374-76, 1570, pp. 1934-35, 1576, pp. 1659-60, 1583, pp. 1768-69.

Ridley had a discussion with Brookes on 16 October, on which day he was degraded. 1563, pp. 1374-76.

Foxe recounts the behaviour of Ridley at supper the night before he was martyred. 1563, pp. 1376-79, 1570, pp. 1936-37, 1576, p. 1661, 1583, p. 1769.

Foxe recounts the behaviour of Ridley and Latimer at their martyrdom. 1563, pp. 1376-1379, 1570, pp. 1937-39, 1576, pp. 1661-62, 1583, p. 1769.

Ridley gave his gown and tippet to Shipside. 1563, p. 1377, 1570, p. 1937, 1576, p. 1661, 1583, p. 1769.

Ridley gave a new groat to Henry Lea. 1563, p. 1377, 1570, p. 1937, 1576, p. 1661, 1583, p. 1769.

Ridley spoke with Lord Williams before his martyrdom. 1563, p. 1379, 1570, p. 1937, 1576, p. 1662, 1583, p. 1769.

Ridley's friendly farewell. 1563, pp. 1379-81, 1570, pp. 1939-43, 1576, pp. 1622-28, 1583, pp. 1770-76.

Ridley's lamentation for a change in religion, in which he makes reference to Latimer, Lever, Bradford and Knox, as well as Cranmer and their part in the duke of Somerset's cause. 1570, pp. 1945-50, 1576, pp. 1670-78, 1583, pp. 1778-84.

Cranmer was confirmed in his reformist beliefs after conference with Ridley. 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1763, 1583, p. 1870.

Cranmer was examined by Bonner and Ely and condemned on 12 September 1556 (seven days before the condemnation of Ridley and Latimer). 1563, pp. 1491-92, 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

In the third year of Edward's reign, Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley admitted Robert Drakes to minister the sacraments. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Letter to Augustine Bernher [BL, Harley 416, fo.16v. Printed in LM, p. 72 et seq. Also in 1570, p. 1902 et seq.].

Letter to Augustine Bernher [BL Harley 416, fos.17v and 32r. Not printed in Foxe or LM].

Letter to Bernher [BL Harley 416, fo.32r. Not printed in AM or LM.]

Letter to Bradford. [BL Harley 416, fo.32v. Printed in LM, pp. 62 et seq. and 1570, p. 1897 et seq.]

Foxe records Nicholas Ridley's writings against idolatry. 1583, pp. 2128-31.

Lord Dacre would have paid a ransom to Mary for his kinsman Nicholas Ridley's life if it were possible but she refused. 1563, p. 1733, 1583, p. 2131.

 
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Sir Thomas Wyatt

(1521? - 1554) (DNB)

Sir Thomas Wyatt was the king's ambassador to the emperor before Sir Henry Knyvet. Wyatt's servant William Wolfe was taken on by Knyvet as steward of his household. 1583, p. 1786.

In 1554 Sir Thomas Wyatt led a rebellion in Kent against Mary, provoked by fear that Mary's marriage to Philip would 'bring upon this Realme most miserable and establish popish religion'. The duke of Norfolk was sent against Wyatt but Norfolk's followers deserted and he retreated.

Wyatt advanced on London in February 1554. Wyatt could not gain entry into London and was resisted and apprehended at the Temple Bar. Wyatt was executed. Foxe promises to relate a story about the removal of Wyatt's head from the spike on Hay Hill where it was displayed, but he never did (1563, pp. 916-17; 1570, pp. 1579-80; 1576, pp. 1347-48; and 1583, pp. 1418-19).

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In 1570 et seq. Foxe prints an account of Mary's oration - there is an earlier, different version of this speech in 1563, pp. 1730-31 - at the London Guildhall denouncing Wyatt. Foxe's marginal notes to this speech, in 1570 et seq., defend Wyatt against Mary's charge that Wyatt looted Southwark (1570, p. 1580; 1576, p. 1348; and 1583, p. 1418).

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Foxe states that Wyatt, at his own request, spoke with Edward Courtenay on the day of his execution and, before the Lieutenant of the Tower, got down on his knees and begged forgiveness of Courtenay for having falsely accused both him and Elizabeth of involvement in his rebellion (1570, p. 1587; 1576, p. 1355; 1583, p. 1425). [It is reported elsewhere that Wyatt did speak with Courtenay on the day of his execution, but what they said is not known; see J. G. Nichols, (ed.), The Chronicle of Queen Jane and of two years of Queen Mary, (London, 1850) Camden Society Original series 48, pp. 72-73].

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Wyatt also allegedly proclaimed from the scaffold that Elizabeth and Courtenay were innocent of any complicity in his crimes, but Hugh Weston who was also standing on the scaffold cried out to the crowd that Wyatt had confessed otherwise to the Privy Council (1570, p. 1587; 1576, p. 1355; and 1583, p. 1425).

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Sir Martin Bowes informed Sir Thomas White that he had heard a report circulating at Westminster, that Wyatt had urged Courtenay to confess the truth (1570, pp. 1587- 88; 1576, p. 1355; and 1583, p. 1425).

During the Star Chamber trial of one Cut, who was charged with sedition for claiming that Wyatt (on the scaffold) had cleared Elizabeth and Courtenay of any complicity in his rebellion, Sir John Brydges, who was present at Wyatt's interview with Courtenay, claimed that Wyatt begged Courtenay to confess the truth and seek the Queen's mercy (1570, p. 1588; 1576, p. 1355; and 1583, pp. 1425-26).

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Foxe declares that he will pass over Wyatt's rebellion, as it has been dealt with in more detail elsewhere (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1467).

The execution of Wyatt on 11 April, and his statement that neither Elizabeth or Courtenay were involved in his conspiracy (1563, p. 1001; 1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1397; 1583, p. 1467).

Elizabeth was suspected of being involved in Wyatt's rebellion. 1563, p. 1711, 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Howard

(1473 - 1554)

Earl of Surrey and 3rd duke of Norfolk. [DNB]

Thomas Howard was released from the Tower on 10 August 1553 (1570, p. 1637; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, p. 1465).

He presided over the treason trial and condemnation of the duke of Northumberland, his son the earl of Warwick and the marquis of Northampton on 18 August 1553 (1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

He accompanied Queen Mary to Westminster Abbey for her coronation on 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

He was sent against Wyatt but was compelled to retreat when his soldiers deserted (1563, p. 916; 1570, p. 1579; 1576, p. 1347; and 1583, p. 1418).

A letter from Mary to Norfolk, describing Wyatt's capture, and dated 8 February 1554, is printed in 1563, p. 1731 and 1583, p. 2128. [It was omitted from 1570 and 1576.]

The old duke of Norfolk witnessed the sudden illness of Stephen Gardiner that preceded his death. 1583, pp. 1787-88.

Cromwell was sent with Norfolk and Suffolk to dine with Cranmer at Lambeth. 1570, p. 2036, 1576, p. 1756, 1583, p. 1862.

Mary sent a letter to him in the first year of her reign. 1583, p. 2128.

In her letter Mary told Howard that three of the Cobhams, Bret, Knevet and Rudstone, and Iseley had been arrested. [The arrest was in connection with the Wyatt rebellion, which Norfolk was sent out to suppress (and failed).] 1583, p. 2128.

 
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William Plane

Minister. Of Bow Row, London.

Master Tracy secretly took a letter to William Plane and asked him to take it to Crome. Someone read the letter while Plane was out of the house and believed Plane the author of its defamatory contents. Plane was sent to the Tower. 1563, p. 1737, 1583, p. 2128.

Plane was racked and tortured in the Tower but refused to reveal that Tracy had written the letter. 1563, p. 1737, 1583, p. 2128.

Plane died three years after being released from the Tower. 1563, p. 1737, 1583, p. 2128.

Tracy never enquired as to the welfare of Plane's family after his death. 1563, p. 1737, 1583, p. 2128.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Kingston upon Thames
Kingston
NGR: TQ 190 660

A parish in the first division of the hundred of Kingston, county of Surrey, comprising the market town of Kingston, which has separate jurisdiction, and two hamlets. 12.5 miles south-west from London. The living is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Surrey, diocese of Winchester, and in the patronage of the Provost and Fellows of Kings College, Cambridge

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Newhall
Newhall
NGR: TL 756 097

Otherwise known as Beaulieu, a royal residence at Boreham. Boreham is a parish in the hundred of Chelmsford, county of Essex. 3.5 miles north-east by east from Chelmsford. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Essex, diocese of London

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2151 [2128]

Queene Mary. A note of Lady Iane. Queene Maries letter to the Duke of Northfolke.

betwene themselues sayd. This man hath wonderfullye trauayled in this matter, and yet in mine opinion hee taketh the Doctours amisse. Well my Lord should D. Heth say, there was no man that coulde auoyd his authorityes of S. Augustine. Wherein sayd my Lord. Then Doctour Heath began to repeate the sayd authorities of Saynt Augustine againe, inferring and applying them so strayghtly agaynst my Lord of Caunterbury, that my Lord was driuen to this shotte anker, and sayd. I seee by it quoth he to Heth, that you with a little more studye will bee easely brought to Frythes opinion: or such like wordes in effect, And some Chapleines there were of my Lorde of Caunterburyes which openly reported that Doctor Heth was as able to defend Frythes assertion in the Sacrament as Fryth was himselfe.

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This learned young man being thus throughly sifted at Croydon to vnderstand what he could say or do in his cause, there was no man willing to preferre hym to aunswere in open disputation as poore Lambart was. But nowe without regarde of learning or good knowledge hee was sent and deteyned vnto the Botchers stall: I meane Byshop Stokeleyes Consistory, there to heare not the opinion of Saynt Augustine and other auncient Fathers of Christes primatiue Churche of the sayde Sacramēt, but either to be instruct and to heare the maymed and halfe cut away Sacrament of Antichrist the Bishop of Rome with the grosse and fleshly imagination thereof or els to perish in the fire as he most constantly did, after hee had before the Byshop of London, Winchester and Chichester in the Consistory in Paules Church most plainely and sincerely confessed his doctrine and fayth in thys weighty matter. &c. pag. 1032.

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¶ A note of William Plane. 
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This account was reprinted from the appendix to the 1563 edition.

IN the latter dayes of king Henry the eight, aboute that time Anne Askew was in trouble, one Doctour Crome was trauayled withall to recant, for that he had preached somewhat agaynst thinges maynteined of the papistes in the Church.  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 700, fn 1

See Strype's Mem. under Mary, vol. iii. part 1, chap. xi. The sermon was preached on the 9th of May, upon "I am the good Shepherd." - ED.

And one M. Tracy hearing therof, brought a letter secretly to one Plane dwelling in Bouge row, and desired him to cary it to Doctor Crome, which letter tended to the end to perswade him not to recant, but to stand to the trueth. When this good man, William Plane had it (as he was euer willing to further the truth) so he gladly deliuered the same to Doctor Crome. Which when he had receiued and read it, he layd it downe vpon the table, and after the sayd William Plane was gone, an Arche Papist came thither to perswade him to recant, and in trauelling with him he found the sayd letter on the boord, which whē he had read it, he examined him from whence it came: so what thorow flattery, and threatning, he declared who was the messenger that brought it. Then was William Plane sent for, cast in the Tower, where he lay miserably xiij. weekes, none admitted to come to him, in which time he was extremely racked, within halfe a finger breadth as farre as Anne Askew: but they could neuer get of hym of whome he had the letter, nor neuer for all theyr extremity would accuse any man, so in the end he was deliuered out of the Tower and liued aboute three yeares after, and so godly ended his life. But vnto this day would that Tracy neuer enquire in what condition his wife and children were left, although he was his Messenger in carying the letter, but good Lord, the straunge disease that grew vpon him by that extreme racking as it is odious to rehearse, so I will wish thē to repentance that were the instruments of his tormentes if they be aliue, & warne other papists to the same, in whom any cruelty hath bene in the like cause.

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A note of Lady Iane. 
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This account was reprinted from the appendix to the 1563 edition.

MarginaliaReferre this to the page. 1407.THe Lady Iane, she whom the Lorde Gilford maryed, being on a time when she was very yong at Newhall in Essex at þe Lady Maries, was by one lady Anne Wharton desired to walke, and they passing by the chappell, the Lady Wharton made lowe curtesie to the popish Sacrament hangyng on the aulter, which when the Lady Iane saw, meruailed why she did so, and asked her whether the Lady Mary were there or not. Vnto whome the Lady Wharton  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 700, line 12 from the bottom

Mr. Douce thinks (MS. note on copy now in the Bodleian) that Lady Jane must, from her reply, have read the following "narration" in the Liber Festivalis, fol. xliii. (misprinted xlvii.) recto, Edit. Paris, 1495:-
"We rede in saynt Gregorys tyme. There was a woman that hight laciva and se made brede [the "singing cake" of Foxe] for the Pope and other preestys to synge with: and for to housell with the peple. Also whan the Pope come to this woman to yeve her housel: and sayd take here Goddis body: thenne this woman smyled and laughed. Thenne the Pope wytdrew his honde; and layd the ostye upon the aultar: and torned to this woman Lacyva and sayd to her, why smylest thou whan thou shouldest receyve Crystis body:and she sayd why calleste thou that Cristis body that I made with my one handis. Thenne was Gregory the Pope sory for her mysbeleve and bad all the peple pray to God to shewe some miracle for this womans helpe: and whan they had prayed long, Gregory wente to the aulter agen, and founde thosty [the host] torned in to red flesche and blood bledynge; and he sheweth it to this woman," &c.
Lady Jane, however, happily did not follow up the story, nor attend to the object here proposed in this scene: "And therfore lete us do all the worship that we may to the sacrament that we can or maye, and be in noo mysbyleve."

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answered no, but she said that she made her curtesie to hym that made vs all. Why, quoth the lady Iane, how can hee be there that made vs all, and the Baker made him? This her aunswere commyng to the Lady Maries eare, she did neuer loue her after, as is credibly reported, but esteemed her as the rest of that christian profession.

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¶ The copy of Queene Maries letters to the Duke of Northfolke. 
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This account was reprinted from the appendix to the 1563 edition.

MarginaliaA letter of Q. Mary to the old Duke of Northfolke.RIght trustie & right entirely beloued Cosin, we greete you well, and hauing by the assistance of God and our louing subiects discomfited Wiate and the other rebels of our Countie of Kent, who hauyng passed the Riuer of Kingston, came backe agayne towards London, & were encountred aboue Charing crosse, and there were ouerthrowen, and the most part of them were there slaine, Wiate, and three of the Cobhams, Bret, Kneuet, Rudstone, Iseley, and other the chiefe Captaines taken prisoners: Wee haue thought good as well to geue you knowledge hereof, to the ende ye may with vs and the rest of our louyng subiects reioyce and geue God thankes for this our victory, as also further to signifie vnto you, that where the sayd rebell did alway pretend the matter of our mariage to be the cause of this vnlawfull stirre, now playnely appeareth by good and substantiall examinations of diuers of the sayd traitours, that whatsoeuer they pretended, the finall meanyng was to haue depriued vs frō our estate and dignitie royall, and consequently to haue destroyed our person, which thing as we do ascertaine you of our honour to bee matter of truth, so wee praye you to cause þe same to be published in all places of that our countries of Norfolke and Suffolke, to the intent our good and louing subiects thereof be no more abused with such false pretenses or other vntrue rumours or tales, by whom so euer the same shall be set forth. And now things beyng in this sort quieted, we cannot but geue you thankes for the readinesse that you haue bene in with the force of our said countrey, to haue serued vs if neede had bene, praying you to do the like on our behalfe to all the Gentlemen and others with you, with whom neuerthelesse we require you to take such orders as the force of our sayd countrey may be still in like readines, to be employed vnder good & substantiall Captaines, to be chosen of the Gentlemen inheritours within the sayd shiere for our further seruice, vpō one houres warning, when so euer we shall require the same. And in the meane tyme our pleasure is, that ye haue good regard to the quietnes and good order of the country, specially to the apprehension of spreaders of false and vntrue tales & rumors, wherby ye shall both deserue well of your whole country, and also do acceptable seruice, which we will not faile to remember accordingly. Yeauen vnder our signe at our pallace of Westminster, the 8. of Febr. the first yeare of our raigne. In hast.

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¶ A Treatise of M. Nich. Ridley, 
Commentary  *  Close

The attribution of this treatise to Ridley rests entirely on Foxe. Several scholars have suggested that it is instead the work of Edmund Grindal and that this treatise was actually composed in 1559 or 1560. (See Patrick Collinson, Archbishop Grindal, 1519-1583: The Struggle for a Reformed Church [Berkeley and Los Angeles: 1979], pp. 97-98 and Stephen Buick, '"Little Children Beware of Images": "An Homily against Peril of Idolatry" and the Quest for "Pure Religion" in the Elizabethan Church", Reformation 2 [1997], pp. 312-13). If so, it may even be that Foxe perpetrated a pious forgery, tendentiously ascribing the treatise to a veneratedbishop and martyr.

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Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 701, middle

This is doubtful. (See the Addenda to Ridley's Works, p. 543, Parker Soc.; and Jewel's Reply to Harding, Art. iii. div. 26.) A reviewer in the British Critic for April, 1843, declares that this is the same as the treatise which Collier gives some account of, as to be found in C. C. C. Cambridge; and states that it is there prefaced with a dedication to Queen Elizabeth, and that instead of "father" the C. C. C. MS. reads "brother." Moreover, the reviewer argues that Edward VI. never threatened to "strain the bishops" in the direction of images.

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in the name, as it seemeth, of the whole Clergie, to King Edward the vj. concernyng Images not to be set vp, nor worshipped in Churches.
Certaine reasons which mooue vs that we cannot with safe consciences, geue our assentes that the Images of Christ, &c. should be placed and erected in Churches.

FIrst the words of the Commandement, MarginaliaExod. 20.Thou shalt not make to thy selfe any grauen image, &c. And the same is repeated more playnely, MarginaliaDeut 27.Deut. 27. Maledictus homo qui facit sculptile & conflatile, &c. ponitʠ: illud in abscondito, &c. 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Nicholas Ridley in a treatise, citing Deuteronomy. 27. 15.
Foxe text Latin

Maledictus homo qui facit sculptile & conflatile, &c. ponitque illud in abscondito, &c.

Foxe text translation

Cursed is the man which maketh a grauen or molten image, &c. and setteth it in a secret place, [and all the people shall say, Amen.]

Actual text of Deuteronomy. 27. 15.

maledictus homo qui facit sculptile et conflatile abominationem Domini opus manuum artificum ponetque illud in abscondito.

[Accurate citation, apart from Foxe's present tenseponitfor the futureponetin the Vulgate.]

That is, Cursed is the man which maketh a grauen or molten image, &c. and setteth it in a secret place, and all the people shall say, Amen.

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In the first place these wordes are to be noted. Thou shalt not make to thy selfe, that is, to any vse of religion.

In the latter place these words: And setteth it in a secret place: for no man durst then commit idolatry openly. So that conferring the places, it doth euidently appeare, that images both for vse of religion, and in place of perill for idolatry, are forbidden.

God knowyng the inclination of man to Idolatry, sheweth the reason why he made this generall prohibition, Ne fortè errore deceptus adores ea & colas: 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Nicholas Ridley in a treatise, citing Deuteronomy. 4. 19.
Foxe text Latin

Ne forte errore deceptus adores ea & colas.

Foxe text translation

Least peraduenture thou beyng deceiued, should bow downe to them and worship them.

Actual text of Deuteronomy. 4. 19 (Vulgate)

ne forte [oculis elevatis ad caelum videas solem et lunam et omnia astra caeli et] errore deceptus adores ea et colas.

[Accurate citation, though 13 words missing from the middle of the sentence.]

That is to say, Least peraduenture thou beyng deceiued, should bow downe to them and worship them.

This generall lawe is generally to be obserued, notwithstanding, that peraduenture a great number cannot be hurt by them, which may appeare by the example followyng.

God forbade the people to ioyne their children in mariage with strangers, addyng the reason: Quia seducit filium tuum ne sequatur me: 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Nicholas Ridley in a treatise, citing Deuteronomy. 7. 4.
Foxe text Latin

Quia seducit filium tuum ne sequatur me.

Foxe text translation

For she will seduce thy sonne, that he shall not follow me.

Actual text of Deuteronomy. 7. 4 (Vulgate)

quia seducet filium tuum ne sequatur me.

[Accurate citation, except for Foxe's present tenseseducitfor the Vulgate futureseducet. Probably a mistake in the Foxe Latin citation, since his translation ofseducitis a future tense.]

That is, For she will seduce thy

sonne
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