Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesLatin/Greek Translations
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Downer

In the 1570 and 1576 editions, Cox is one of the false witnesses against Julins Palmer during his first examination by the mayor of Reading. In the 1583 edition, Foxe reports that Thackham has denied being an enemy of Palmer and working against him. He has come to Foxe and sworn an oath to that effect. Foxe does not mention names of the 'false brethren' in 1583, except to say he is omitting Thackham and Downer. 1570, pp. 2120-21, 1576, pp. 1842-43, 1583, p. 1937.

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John Moyer wrote Master Perry a letter which referred to John Bolton, Downer, Gately, Radley (now vicar of St Lawrence), Bowyer (a tanner) and Julins Palmer (who was indicted by Thackham). 1583, p. 2140.

 
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Gately

John Moyer wrote Master Perry a letter which referred to John Bolton, Downer, Gately, Radley (now vicar of St Lawrence), Bowyer (a tanner) and Julins Palmer (who was indicted by Thackham). 1583, p. 2140.

 
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John Barwick

(fl. 1543 - 1565)

B.A. (1548/49). Clerk of Magdalen College, 1543 - 1553, chaplain (1553 - 1554). MA (1556), fellow of Trinity College, Oxford (1556 - 1565). Dean of Trinity (1556) (Foster). Apparently resigned his Trinity fellowship in 1565. (See J R Bloxam, A Register of.. Magdalen College, 7 vols [Oxford, 1853-81], II, p. 38.)

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Not long before Julins Palmer's death, Barwick, an old acquaintance of his, tried to reason with him and warned him of the fire. 1570, p. 2119, 1576, p. 1842, 1583, p. 1936.

Julins Palmer disputed with Barwick, MA, of Magdalen College, Oxford, who believed Palmer's doctrine would change if threatened with burning. 1583, p. 2141.

 
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John Bolton

Silkweaver of Reading, Berkshire.

Bolton was apprehended in the investigation following the placing of a libel against the mass on the church door at Reading during Lent 1554. Bolton was suspected of being the libeller (although John Moyer was actually the culprit). When questioned Bolton declared that the mass was against the word of God and he was imprisoned. Stephen Gardiner came through Reading and interviewed Bolton, who reproved Gardiner. The Bishop ordered that Bolton be kept in prison on bread and water. Bolton was placed in a pair of stocks in a dungeon. The gaoler tormented him, particularly by intercepting food sent to Bolton by friends and eating it himself or throwing it to the dogs. Bolton was confined in the dungeon for a year and ten weeks, and he went mad. Sir Francis Englefield, and his brother, had Bolton discharged because of his insanity. Foxe states that the story was confirmed by letters to him by witnesses in Reading and by interviewing Bolton himself (1563, pp. 1017-18; never reprinted).

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Another native of Reading, Thomas Thackham, wrote to Foxe that Bolton was actually imprisoned for railing against Mary and that he merely feigned madness (BL, Harley MS 428, fol 18v; printed in J. G. Nichols, ed., Narratives of the Days of the Reformation, Camden Society, Original Series 77 (London, 1859), p. 96).

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Bolton's release was also controversial. John Moyer, the real author of the libel, wrote to Foxe stating that Thackham had induced Bolton to recant (and implied that this led to Bolton's release) (Strype, EM III, 2, pp. 427-30). Thackham claimed in a letter to Foxe that he provided sureties to secure Bolton's release, which he forfeited when Bolton fled abroad (BL, Harley 425, fols 18v-19r; printed in Nichols, Narratives, p. 97). Also one of Thackham's critics wrote to Foxe agreeing that Bolton had fled but declaring that no sureties were paid or forfeited (BL, Harley MS 425, fols. 33v-34r; printed in Nichols, Narratives, p. 90).

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What is certain is that Bolton fled to Geneva (C. H. Garrett, The Marian Exiles: A Study in the Origins of Elizabethan Protantism (Cambridge, 1938), pp. 94-95).

After Mary's death, Bolton returned to London and was a member of the dissenting Plumber's Hall congregation in 1567 (Champlin Burrage, The Early English Dissenters in the Light of Recent Research (2 vols, Cambridge, 1912), I, p. 88).

Bolton apparently recanted and was excommunicated by the Plumber's Hall congregation. He subsequently hanged himself (Patrick Collinson, The Elizabethan Puritan Movement (London, 1967), p. 90).

John Moyer wrote Master Perry a letter which referred to John Bolton, Downer, Gately, Radley (now vicar of St Lawrence), Bowyer (a tanner) and Julins Palmer (who was indicted by Thackham). 1583, p. 2140.

 
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John Moyer

Minister of Corsley, Wiltshire

The author of a libel against the Mass which was posted on the church door at Reading during Lent in 1554. John Bolton was suspected of being the author of the libel and imprisoned (1563, p. 1017).

[The name of Moyer's living is taken from a letter he wrote to Foxe concerning Bolton's imprisonment: see Strype, EM III, 2, pp. 427-30].

 
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Julins Palmer

(1525? - 1556)

Born in Coventry. Son of Roger Palmer, mercer or upholsterer, who was sheriff of Coventry in 1525 and 1533. Fellow of Magdalen, Oxford. Schoolmaster. Martyr. [ODNB]

Julins Palmer was a papist while at Oxford during Edward VI's reign. 1563, p. 1539, 1570, p. 2117, 1576, p. 1840, 1583, p. 1934.

He himself suffered at the hands of papists in Newbury in Berkshire. 1563, p. 1539, 1570, p. 2117, 1576, p. 1840, 1583, p. 1934.

Julins Palmer was a scholar to John Harley in Oxford. 1563, p. 1539, 1570, p. 2117, 1576, p. 1840, 1583, p. 1934.

Foxe recounts his character, early education and formative years. 1563, p. 1539, 1570, p. 2117, 1576, p. 1840, 1583, p. 1934.

Shortly before the end of Edward VI's reign, slanderous notices were pinned up in Magdalene College, Oxford, about its president, Walter Haddon. Suspicion and blame were cast on Palmer, who was expelled. 1563, p. 1540, 1570, p. 2118, 1576, pp. 1840-41, 1583, pp. 1934-35.

After expulsion from Oxford, Julins Palmer became a teacher of children in the house of Sir Francis Knollys. 1570, p. 2118, 1576, p. 1841, 1583, p. 1935.

He was restored to Magdalene, Oxford, under Mary. 1563, p. 1540, 1570, p. 2118, 1576, p. 1841, 1583, p. 1935.

John Bullingham wrote a letter, dated 26 April 1563, about Julins Palmer's conversion and his own. He mentions Palmer's reading of Calvin. 1563, p. 1540, 1583, p. 1935.

Palmer became inquistive of martyrs who had died and their reasons. 1570, p. 2118, 1576, p. 1841, 1583, p. 1935.

He sent a scholar to Gloucester to find out about the death of John Hooper. 1570, p. 2118, 1576, p. 1841, 1583, p. 1935.

He went to the burning of Ridley and Latimer. 1570, p. 2118, 1576, p. 1841, 1583, p. 1935.

Palmer read Peter Martyr's Commentaries on 1 Corinthians, borrowed from a Magdalene scholar. 1570, p. 2118, 1576, p. 1841, 1583, p. 1935.

Cole, the president, abohorred Palmer and suspected his doctrinal beliefs. 1570, p. 2119, 1576, p. 1841, 1583, p. 1936.

Friar John gave a sermon at Magdalen that deeply offended Palmer. 1570, p. 2119, 1576, p. 1841, 1583, p. 1936.

Shipper, the bursar of the house, invited Palmer to dinner. Unbeknown to Palmer, the other guests included Friar John, Richard Smith and Dr Tresham. 1570, p. 2119 [no names given other than the friar's], 1576, p. 1842, 1583, p. 1936.

Palmer refused to take the friar by the hand. 1570, p. 2119, 1576, p. 1842, 1583, p. 1936.

Palmer refused to take the cup from the friar. 1570, p. 2119, 1576, p. 1842, 1583, p. 1936.

Barwicke, an old acquaintance of Palmer's and sometime clerk at Magdalene, then fellow of Trinity, tried to turn Palmer back to catholicism. 1570, p. 2119, 1576, p. 1841, 1583, p. 1936.

Julins Palmer made a great search for books, including Morwyn's verses touching Winchester's epitaph. 1570, p. 2119, 1576, p. 1842, 1583, p. 1936.

He resigned his fellowship to become schoolmaster in Reading. 1570, p. 2119, 1570, p. 2119, 1576, p. 1842, 1583, p. 1936.

Julins Palmer's mother lived in Esham. Shipper and his brother told her of his approach on the way to Reading. He had gone to request some of his legacy. She refused and cursed him. 1570, p. 2120, 1576, p. 1842, 1583, p. 1936.

Alan Cope, fellow of Magdalene, gave suit, and he obtained a letter from Dr Cole to the preferment of a teaching post in Gloucestershire. 1570, p. 2120, 1576, p. 1842, 1583, p. 1936.

Palmer travelled with friends to Reading, where Master Hampton drew suspicion upon him and had him arrested. He was treated very badly by his jailor. He was placed in a dungeon for about ten days. 1570, p. 2120, 1576, p. 1842, 1583, p. 1936.

Julins Palmer's first examination was by the mayor, brought by Thomas Thackham (who had been in the teaching post that Palmer had taken). False witnesses against him were Cox, Cately and Downer. Articles were brought against him. 1570, pp. 2120-21, 1570, pp. 1842-43, 1583, 1937-38.

Julins Palmer's second examination on 10 July 1556 at Newbury was before Dr Geffre (chancellor of Salisbury), John Winchcomb, esquire, Sir Richard Abridges, Sir William Rainford [in 1576 and 1583], and the parson of Englefield. 1570, pp. 2121-23, 1576, pp. 1844-46,1583, pp. 1938-40.

John Moyer wrote Master Perry a letter which referred to John Bolton, Downer, Gately, Radley (now vicar of St Lawrence), Bowyer (a tanner) and Julins Palmer (who was indicted by Thackham). 1583, p. 2140.

Julins Palmer disputed with Barwick, MA, of Magdalen College, Oxford, who believed his doctrine would change if threatened with burning. 1583, p. 2141.

He was burned at Newbury on July 1556. He was thought to be dead, but raised his head and said 'Jesu' before he finally died. 1570, p. 2123, 1576, p. 1846, 1583, p. 1940.

[Variants for his first name are 'Julius', 'Joscelyn']

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Lady Elizabeth Fane

(d. 1568)

Widow of Sir Ralph Fane. Great supporter of protestants. (DNB sub Sir Ralph Bane)

John Bradford wrote a letter to Lady Fane ('The true sense and sweete feeling') 1570, p. 1824, 1576, pp. 1559-60, 1583, p. 1842.

John Bradford wrote another letter to Lady Fane. ('As to myne owne soule') 1570, p. 1824, 1576, p. 1560, 1583, p. 1642.

John Bradford wrote another letter to Lady Vane ('The good spirite'). 1570, pp. 1829-31, 1576, pp. 1565-66, 1583, p. 1647.

Lady Fane wrote a letter to Bonner. 1563, p. 1445, 1570, p. 1999, 1576, p. 1724, 1583, pp. 1828-29.

She received several letters from John Philpot. 1570, pp. 2009-12, 1576, pp. 1730-33, 1583, pp. 1835-38.

[An anonymous letter (almost certainly sent by her) to bishop Bonner is in BL, Harley 416, fos.76r-v. It is a companion to the anonymous letter printed in 1583, pp. 1842-43.]

Foxe compared Lady Anne Knevet to Lady Elizabeth Fane. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

[Foxe refers to her as Elizabeth Vane.]

 
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Master Perry

Preacher at Beverstone.

John Moyer wrote Master Perry a letter which referred to John Bolton, Downer, Gately, Radley (now vicar of St Lawrence), Bowyer (a tanner) and Julins Palmer (who was indicted by Thackham). 1583, p. 2140.

 
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Patrick Pattingham

Martyr.

Foxe records a copy of Pattingham's confession. 1583, p. 2141.

[Also known as 'Patchingham'.]

 
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Radley

Student of Cardinal College, Oxford [Fines]

Thomas Garrard was sheltered in Oxford by Radley and was arrested at his house. 1563, p. 604; 1570, p. 1366; 1576, p. 1166; 1583, p. 1194.

Those suspected of heresy at Oxford at the time of the trial of Thomas Garrard and Anthony Dalaber included John Clerk, Henry Sumner, William Bettes, John Taverner, Radley, Nicholas Udall, John Diet, William Eden, John Langport, John Salisbury and Robert Ferrar. 1563, p. 609; 1570, p. 1369; 1576, p. 1168; 1583, p. 1197.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Bowyer

(by 1511 - 1576)

Tanner and mayor of Reading 1547 - 1548, 1553 - 1554, 1558 - 1559, 1570 - 1571 [Bindoff, Commons].

Bowyer interrogated John Bolton on suspicion that Bolton had attached a libel denouncing the mass to the church door at Reading and sent Bolton to prison when Bolton declared that the mass was against the word of God (1563, p. 1017).

Melvin wrote a letter to his brethren in Reading whilst imprisoned in Newgate which referred to John Bolton, Downer, Gately, Radley (now vicar of St Lawrence), Bowyer (a tanner) and Julins Palmer (who was indicted by Thackham). 1583, p. 2140.

 
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Beverston
Beuerstone
NGR: ST 862 940

A parish in the upper division of the hundred of Berkeley, county of Gloucester. 2 miles west-north-west from Tetbury. The living is a rectory, with the perpetual curacy of Kingscote annexed, in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Gloucester.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Corsley
Corsly
NGR: ST 825 465

A parish, comprising Great and Little Corsley in the hundred of Warminster, county of Wiltshire. 3.25 miles west-north-west from Warminster. The living is a discharged rectory in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Salisbury

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Reading
NGR: SU 173 720

A borough having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Reading, county of Berkshire. 26 miles south-east by south from Abingdon, 39 miles west by south from London. The town comprises the parishes of St Giles, St Lawrence and St Mary, all in the Archdeaconry of Berkshire and Diocese of Salisbury. Each living is a vicarage.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2164 [2141]

A note of Iulins Palmer. The confeßion of Patrike Patingham.

MarginaliaEcclesia eum paucis diebus habuit quantum ad humanitatem, modo fide tenet, occulis non videt. 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Foxe text marginal note.
Foxe text Latin

Ecclesia eum paucis diebus habuit quantum ad humanitatem, modo fide tenet, occulis [sic] non videt.

Foxe text translation (Line 1)

The Church had him but a few dayes touching his humanitie, nowe they haue him by fayth, with these eyes they do not see him.

alwayes with you. The Church had him but a few dayes touching his humanitie, nowe they haue him by fayth, with these eyes they do not see him. O Iesus Christ thou sonne of the liuing God, whiche art in the bosome of thy father God with God, the very Image of God the father eternall, geue vs victory ouer this Antichrist in thy most precious bloud. Be faythfull to the ende and oure sauiour shall crown vs in glory: let vs sanctify the name of God in thought, word, and deede.

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I say vnto the Papist and will not flatter.
our God is in heauen whome they will not see:
And is no such little prety mattere,
as their God the Pope faineth him to be.

Pray for all the preachers of the veritie,
that God may geue vs grace and constancie.

They sing and say they haue him in a string,
tye not the dog so, for feare of hanging.

To all the faythfull whose names in generall,
in the booke of lyfe, by Christ are written all.

The godly thought and patient minde,
doth liberty in prison finde.
Who so to patience can attayne,
shall finde in prison is no payne.
Thrall, trouble, bownd, or free,
as pleaseth Gid, so shall all be.
Wherefore I neuer will forsake,
what pleaseth God lay on my backe.

Iohn Meluine preacher and pri-
prisoner in Newgate.

¶ A note concerning the trouble of Iulius Palmer,  
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 721, middle

Foxe calls him Julius in the Latin and in 1570; but Jocelinus, in his Letter presenting his "Acts and Monuments" to Magdalen College; and "Julines" and "Julyne" in 1563, and "Julins" in 1576 and all subsequent editions; so that "Julius" would seem to be an error.

lately come to my handes.

To his assured friend and brother in Chryst Mayster Perry preacher at Beuerstone geue these.

MarginaliaReferre and conferre this with the pag. 1937.MAyster Perry after my harty commendations in the Lord Iesus Christ vnto you and your wife &c. wheras you haue written vnto me for my help in stoppyng the malicious and enuious mouth of Thomas Thackam, I would be as glad as any man to testifie the truth, both for that I know of the shameles malice of the sayd party, agaynst the members of Christ, as also the godly and vertuous behauiour of Palmer both before he was in prison, and after in prison, with the credite of that good and godly worke of that history: but surely many thinges are out of my hed, which I cannot as yet remember. And for these things I know, I wryte vnto you. And first as touching the frendship shewed vnto the Lady Vane, and hys zeale therein vttered, trueth it is that hee receaued her into hys house for mony for a small space, in the whiche time they two did not well agree, for that she coulde not suffer hys wickednes of wordes and gestures vnreproued, but that his wife many times being of more honesty madeþe matter well agayne, but to be short, suche was his frendshyp in the ende towardes that good Lady, being out of hys house, that she feared no man more for her lyfe, then him. And I being her man she gaue me great charge alwayes to beware of him. As touching his frendship towardes Iohn Bolton in prison, I am sure he neuer found any, as they that vsed to visite him, can somewhat say: Except you accompt this friendship, that he beyng bereft of hys senses, Thac. wrought him to yeld vnto the papistes, and as a right member of them became his suretie to be obedient vnto them. And hee beyng burdened in conscience therewith, fled away vnto Geneua, for the which flieng Thac. had nothing sayd vnto hym, which sheweth that he was their instrument. And this friendship to Iohn Bolton, for Downer I haue heard no euill of him: for Gateley and Radley now Vicar of S. Laurence, and Bowyer a Tanner, they three left no meanes vnpractised to catche and persecute the members of Christ as I my selfe can well prooue. As touching Palmer, for that I many tymes frequented his company in his lodging, he woulde vtter sometymes vnto me the griefe of his mynd. Among other things once he told me, that for that he heard he was somwhat suspected with the womā of the house, he was much grieued withall, the which he vttred with many teares. I then counsailing him to depart thence to auoyd the occasion of offence, he sayd no, but the Lord should try him or it were long: for sayd he, Thac. hath let me his schole, and now would haue it againe, and because I will not let him haue it, this he hath brought vppon me, but God forgeue

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him. Afterward beyng in prison, I talking with hym at the grate, he shewed me his iudgement of the scriptures, and deliuered it vnto me, what became of it I knowe not now. He praysed God highly for his estate, and then hee sayd he trusted it would appeare whether Thac. had sayd of him well or not. And further he sayd, that now Thack. hath his will to haue his schoole agayne: for if I woulde haue yelded vp the schoole, he would haue sent me away, I neuer trusted him to well sayd he, to communicate my mynd vnto hym before witnesse, but sometyme alone, and therfore he hath deuised a letter in my name, and brought it to light to cause me to bee examined of my conscience. This is as much as I can say at this tyme. Thus fare you well in the Lord, Amen. From Corsly this 18. of May.

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Yours to commaund in
Christ, Iohn Moyer
Minister.

Haue me commended I pray you to all my friends at Readyng.

A note of Iulins Palmer.

ALso being at Magdalene colledge about a moneth before he was burned, and reasoning against one Barwike Maister of Arte sometyme his familiar friende and olde acquaintance in the sayd Colledge, after much talke, Barwike said vnto him, Well Palmer, Now thou talkest boldly and stoutly at thy pleasure, if thou were brought to a stake, thou wouldst tell me another tale. Take heed, it is an hard matter to burne. Hereunto Palmer answered. In deed it is an hard matter for him to burne þt hath his soule linked to his body as a thiefes foote is tied in a paire of fetters. But if a man be once able through Gods helpe to seperate and deuide the soule from the body, for him it is no harder a thing to burne, thē for me to eat this crumme of bread.

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¶ A true Copy of the Confession of Patricke Patingham sent out of Newgate to certayn of his frends.

MarginaliaReferre this to the page. 1686.I Patricke Patingham, being condemned for the veritie of Gods trueth that is to say in confessing of one God, which was the creatour of all things visible and inuisible and also that he made those by his sonne, whome he hath made heyre of all thinges. And also I confesse, that he is the onely begotten sonne of God, in whome we haue redemption, euen the forgeuenes of sinnes. And also in confessing Gods most holy Church, being builded vpon the foundation of the Apostles, and Prophetes Iesus Christ being the head corner stone. In whome sayth S. Paule euery building coupled together groweth to an holy temple in the Lord, in whome I beleeue I am builded together as a member and made an habitation for God in the spirite. And also I confesse that Christ is the head of the holy Church, as S. Paule sayth, and that God is Christs head.

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And also I had x. articles that is to say agaynst theyr wicked traditions and commaundementes whiche they vse, whiche are agaynst the commaundementes of God, whereof they did condemne me not suffering me to speake in the consistory house, but condemning me not my cause heard. But yet I did protest vnto them, that their Church or synagogue is of Sathan, that is to say, Sathan beyng the head thereof. Furthermore, my friend or friendes vnknown, I haue receiued your letter and red it ouer, wherin you say that I am in a blasphemous errour. In deede frends I confesse, that it is an error. If you will make my beliefe, that is to say, that Christ is the sonne of the liuyng God, to be an errour, and to beleeue that there is one god as S. Paule saith, and one mediatour betwixt God and man, euen the man Christ Iesus. And although there bee that are called Gods,. whether in heauen or in earth, as there be Gods many and Lordes many, yet vnto vs is there but one God which is the father, of whome are all things, and we in hym, and one Lord Iesus Christ, by whom are all thyngs, and we by him. I beleeue that there is but one Lord, one fayth, one Baptisme, and one God in all, and aboue all, and thorough all, which onely God as S. Paule sayeth, worketh in all creatures that beleeue in him, and speaketh in them as S. Paule sayeth: God in tymes past diuersly and many wayes spake vnto the fathers by prophets, but in these last daies he spake vnto vs by his sonne whom he hath made heire of all thyngs. My friend or friends, be it known vnto you, that this is no errour as ye suppose, but it is the truth of Gods will, that we should beleeue as S. Iohn sayth: That Christ Iesus

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