Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesLatin/Greek TranslationsCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Beckingham

Master Beckingham attached gunpowder (given to him by Spicer's son) to John Spicer at the stake. He and the sheriff bade Spicer to be brave. 1583, p. 2144.

 
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Joan Trunchfield

(d. 1556)

Wife of Michael Trunchfield. Martyr. Of Ipswich.

Joan Trunchfield's husband feared for her safety. She told him not to be fearful when she visited him and their children. 1563, p. 1734, 1583, p. 2144.

Foxe recounts Joan Trunchfield's bravery at the stake. 1570, p. 2072, 1576, p. 1787, 1583, p. 1894.

She was burned at Ipswich in late February or early March 1556. 1563, p. 1503 [1563 states specifically 19 February 1556 but this is then changed in subsequent editions to the more vague Feb/March], 1570, p. 2072, 1576, p. 1787, 1583, p. 1894.

 
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John Avales

Described by Foxe as one of Queen Mary's servants. Probably a constable. Of Southwark.

John Lithal was brought for examination by John Avales. 1570, p. 2266, 1576, p. 1957, 1583, p. 2063.

Dabney was brought for examination before Bonner by John Avales. 1563, p. 1696, 1570, p. 2275, 1576, p. 1964, 1583, p. 2071.

Unable to find Dabney, Avales demanded 15 crowns from his wife and eventually left them alone. 1563, p. 1697, 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Avales searched for a congregation in London and came close to spotting them. 1570, p. 2278, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2074.

He talked with two men in Pudding Lane but was unable to locate the underground congregation in the area. 1570, p. 2278, 1576, p. 1967, 1583, p. 2074.

Richard Waterson was apprehended by Roin Caly, John Hill and John Avales and sent before Bonner. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

 
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John Hill

(fl. 1556 - 1562)

Stationer. Of London. [See E. G. Duff, A Century of the English Book Trade: Short Notices of All Printers, Stationers, Book-binders, and Others Connected with it from the Issue of the First Dated Book in 1457 to the Incorporation of the Company of Stationers in 1557 (London, 1948), p. 72.]

Richard Waterson was apprehended by Robin Caly, John Hill and John Avales and sent before Bonner. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

 
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John Maundrel

(d. 1556)

Husbandman. Martyr. Of Bullingham, Wiltshire.

John Maundrel was the son of Robert Maundrel of Rowde. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He converted to protestantism after reading Tyndale's translation of scripture. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

During Henry VIII's reign he was brought before Dr Trigonion at Edington Abbey in Wiltshire and accused of speaking against the sacrament. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He did penance in the town of Devises, Wiltshire. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

During Mary's reign, Maundrel removed to Gloucester and north of Wiltshire and moved between these areas in an attempt to avoid further persecution. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He probably stayed with John Bridges and tended his cattle during this period [Foxe is not completely sure it was Bridges]. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He returned home and spoke to a friend, Anthony Clee, at Vyes, about why he had returned home to the threat of persecution. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He conferred with William Coberley and John Spicer during Mary's reign. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

Maundrel went with Coberley and Spicer to the parish church of Keevil and urged the parishoners, in particular Robert Barksdale, not to worship the idol carried there: the host. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He called out to the priest at Keevil that purgatory was nothing more than the pope's blindfold. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He was held in the stocks until the service was over, handed to a justice and then transported to Salisbury to appear before John Capon and William Geffre. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He was examined by William Geffre. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He was offered the chance to recant and be pardoned by John St John. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

Maundrel was burned at Salisbury on 24 March 1556 with William Corberley and John Spicer. 1563, p. 1504, 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

Geffre spoke to John Maundrel at the stake and bade him to recant. 1563, p. 1734, 1583, p. 2144.

Thomas Gilford, a merchant from Poole, Dorset, berated Geffre for his treatment of Maundrel. 1563, p. 1734, 1583, p. 2144.

[Note that in 1563 Foxe does not know his christian name.]

 
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John Spicer

(d. 1556)

Martyr. Bricklayer. Of Winston, Suffolk.

John Spicer went with Maundrel and Coberley to the parish church of Keevil and urged the parishoners, in particular Robert Barksdale, not to worship the host. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894. [Note that in 1563 Foxe did not know what they were examined and condemned for.]

Spicer agreed with Maundrel when Maundrel called out to the priest at Keevil that purgatory was nothing more than the pope's blindfold. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

Spicer was held in the stocks until the service was over, handed to a justice and then transported to Salisbury to appear before John Capon, bishop of Salisbury and William Geffre, the chancellor. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He was examined by William Geffre. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, pp. 1734, 1788, 1583, pp. 1894, 2144.

On 23 March 1556 John Spicer appealed to John St John not to become guilty of the butchery of innocent men such as Spicer, Maundrel and Coberley. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

Foxe records Spicer's words at the stake. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

Master Beckingham attached gunpowder (given to him by Spicer's son) to John Spicer at the stake. He and the sheriff bade Spicer to be brave. 1563, p. 1734, 1583, p. 2145.

Spicer was burned at Salisbury on 24 March 1556 with William Coberley and John Maundrel. 1563, p. 1504, 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

[He is called Robert Spicer in 1563, p. 1504., 1570, p. 2072, 1576, p. 1787.]

 
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John Story

(1510? - 1571)

1st Regius Professor of Civil Law. Roman catholic martyr. (DNB)

John Story was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

In the 1563 edition, Foxe claims that Story urged that Elizabeth be executed, maintaining that it was pointless to cut the branches off a tree and not strike at its roots (1563, p. 1004). These passages were never reprinted.

In a letter to Augustine Bernher, Bradford asked him to discover what Master G. had said to Doctor Story and others. 1570, p. 1837, 1576, p. 1572, 1583, p. 1654.

Dr Story was said by Dr Martin to have been the chief procurer of the deaths of John Warren, his wife and daughter, although he was a relative of theirs. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

When John Denley sang a psalm at his burning, Story rebuked him for it. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1686.

John Story is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

The first examination of John Philpot was by Cholmley, Master Roper and John Story and one of the scribes of the Arches at Newgate Hall on 2 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89 , 1583, pp. 1795-96.

In Philpot's first examination, Story claimed that Philpot was guilty of heresy for speaking against the mass. 1563, pp. 1388-90, 1570, pp. 1961-62, 1576, pp. 1688-89, 1583, pp. 1795-96.

Philpot's second examination was before Cholmley, Roper, Story and Cook and the scribe on 24 October 1555. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

During Philpot's second examination, Story demanded that Philpot be taken to Lollard's Tower, after which he was imprisoned in Bonner's coal house. 1563, pp. 1390-92, 1570, pp. 1962-64, 1576, pp. 1689-91, 1583, pp. 1797-98.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

Story was one of the commissioners who sent John Went, John Tudson, Thomas Brown and Joan Warren to be examined and imprisoned. 1563, p. 1453, 1570, p. 2016, 1576, p. 1737, 1583, p. 1845.

A complaint about John Tudson was sent to Story. 1563, p. 1467, 1570, p. 2029, 1576, p. 1749, 1583, p. 1857.

Cranmer was examined by Brookes, Martin and Story. 1563, pp. 1479-83, 1570, pp. 2046-47, 1576, pp. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

A new commission was sent to Rome for the restoration of the pope's authority to allow the condemnation of Cranmer. Those sent were: James Brookes, Martyn and Story . 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Story's oration against Cranmer. 1576, pp. 1769-70, 1583, pp. 1875-76.

Story said that they were true witnesses, as they swore allegience to the pope. Cranmer was was sent to Gloucester by Story. 1570, p. 2056, 1576, p. 1773, 1583, p. 1879.

Henry Adlington received a letter from John Careless, which referred to Story. 1570, pp. 2110-12, 1576, pp. 1833-34, 1583, pp. 1928-29.

Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 1980.

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Ralph Allerton was examined on 24 April 1557 before Bonner, Lord North, Dr Story and others. 1563, p. 1621, 1570, p. 2210-11, 1576, p. 1907-08, 1583, p. 2015-16.

A chaplain asked Thomas Green to repeat the articles of his faith before Story. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2061.

Story questioned Green on the mass and the church fathers. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Green appeared again before Story. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Story commanded Green be whipped 100 times, although this was objected to, at which point Story said he would have Green's tongue cut out if he could. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2062.

Elizabeth Young's eighth examination was before Bonner, the dean of St Paul's and Story. 1570, pp. 2273-74, 1576, pp. 1962-63, 1583, pp. 2069-70.

Alexander Wimshurst was carried before Story and Cook who asked him where his whore was. Wimshurst defended his wife's honour and her whereabouts. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Edward Benet asked Story to help him out of prison, which he did, only to deliver him to Cluney who put him in stocks in the coalhouse for a week. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Richard Waterson was examined by Story, when he was told that £40 would release him from punishment. This was reduced to £10 but eventually a warrant was made to Richard Grafton who was forced to watch the beating of Gye upon a cross at Bridewell. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

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John Story had accused Angel's wife of murdering a woman and her child who resided with her in her house. He sent her to Newgate. Sir Roger Cholmley dismissed the charges against her. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2010.

At Elizabeth's accession Story was committed to ward but he managed to escape overseas, where he met with the duke of Alva in Antwerp. 1583, p. 2153.

Parker, a merchant, was sent to apprehend Story and return him to England. 1583, p. 2153.

Parker told Story that a ship had come from England and that he might like to peruse the merchandise on board. Story suspected nothing, was caught and returned to England. 1583, p. 2153.

In prison, Story refused to agree to the act of supremacy and was subsequently hung, drawn and quartered as a traitor. 1583, p. 2153.

Foxe refers to his death. 1563, p. 1706.

 
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Richard Cluney

Bonner's summoner. Keeper of Lollards Tower.

Cluney witnessed the degradation of John Hooper and John Rogers on 4 February 1555. 1563, p. 1058; 1570, p. 1681; 1576, p. 1435; 1583, p. 1508. [NB: Described as a bell ringer in 1563, p. 1058, but this was changed to summoner in later editions.]

Bonner's writ for the excommunication of John Tooley was sent to Cluney. 1563, p. 1143; 1570, p. 1757; 1576, p. 1501; 1583, p. 1582.

Robert Johnson wrote a letter to Bonner about Whittle, confirming Cluney's and Harpsfield's reports. He mentioned that Sir Thomas More's submission was read to him twice to no good effect. 1563, p. 1456, 1570, p. 2018, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, pp. 1846-47.

John Harpsfield wrote a letter to Bonner about Whittle's subscription, in which he mentioned Cluney's report. 1563, pp. 1455-56, 1570, pp. 2017-18, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, pp. 1846-47.

Margery Mearing was talking with a friend when she saw Cluney, Bonner's summoner, making his way to her house. Cluney took her away to be examined. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2228, 1576, p. 1924, 1583, p. 2031.

Cluney took William Living to his own house, robbed him, and then took him to Bonner's coalhouse and put him in the stocks. Cluney eventually brought him meat and then took him to Darbyshire who presented him with a list of names. Cluney took Julian Living to Lollards Tower. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1956, 1583, p. 2063.

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John Fetty was taken by Richard Tanner and his fellow constables to Sir John Mordaunt who then sent him to Cluney, Bonner's summoner, who sent him to Lollards Tower and put him in the stocks. 1563, p. 1693, 1570, p. 2257, 1576, p. 1949, 1583, p. 2056.

The chaplains had Cluney take William Fetty to his father in Lollards Tower. 1563, p. 1693, 1570, p. 2256, 1576, p. 1948, 1583, p. 2055.

The child told his father what had happened, at which point Cluney seized the child and returned him to Bonner's house. 1563, p. 1693, 1570, p. 2256, 1576, p. 1948, 1583, p. 2055.

Thomas Green was transferred quickly from Lollards Tower to the coalhouse by Cluney and then put in the stocks. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

After examination, Cluney removed Green to prison again, first to the coalhouse and then the salthouse. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

Cluney delivered Green to Trinian, the porter of Christ's hospital, where he was thrown into the dungeon. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2061.

After Elizabeth Young's sixth examination, Darbyshire called on Cluney to take her away. Cluney took her to the stockhouse, where she was kept in irons, and then to Lollards Tower, where she was kept in stocks and irons. 1570, p. 2273, 1576, p. 1962, 1583, p. 2069.

Alexander Wimshurst was sent to Cluney's house in Paternoster Row, where he was to be carried forward to Lollard's Tower, but Cluney, his wife and maid had no time to lock up Wimshurst as they were extremely busy. When Wimshurst was left alone in Cluney's hall, a woman came to him and told him this was his chance to escape, which he took. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

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Edward Benet asked Story to help him out of prison, which he did, only to deliver him to Cluney who put him in stocks in the coalhouse for a week. 1570, p. 2279, 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

[Foxe occasionally refers to him as 'Richard Cloney'.]

 
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Richard Grafton

(d. 1573)

Protestant printer. Of London. [See E. G. Duff, A Century of the English Book Trade: Short Notices of All Printers, Stationers, Book-binders, and Others Connected with it from the Issue of the First Dated Book in 1457 to the Incorporation of the Company of Stationers in 1557 (London, 1948), p. 59.]

Richard Grafton was exempted from Mary's coronation pardon, 1 October 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1466).

Richard Waterson was examined by Story where he was told that £40 would release him from punishment. This was reduced to £10 but eventually a warrant was made to Richard Grafton who was forced to watch the beating of Gye upon a cross at Bridewell. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

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Richard Waterson

(d. 1563)

Stationer. Of London. [See E. G. Duff, A Century of the English Book Trade: Short Notices of All Printers, Stationers, Book-binders, and Others Connected with it from the Issue of the First Dated Book in 1457 to the Incorporation of the Company of Stationers in 1557 (London, 1948), p. 166.]

William Gye bought a Bible and service book from Richard Waterson, who dwelt with Master Duixile in St Paul's Churchyard. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

Richard Waterson was apprehended by Robin Caly, John Hill and John Avales and sent before Bonner. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

Richard Waterson was examined by Story where he was told that £40 would release him from punishment. This was reduced to £10 but eventually a warrant was made to Richard Grafton who was forced to watch the beating of Gye upon a cross at Bridewell. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robin Caly

Persecutor of protestants.

Richard Gibson was sent for by a promoter called Robin Caly. 1563, p. 1640, 1570, p. 2224, 1576, p. 1920, 1583, p. 2026.

Caly acted impiously and cruelly towards Gibson as he transferred him from prison. 1563, p. 1641, 1570, p. 2224, 1576, p. 1920, 1583, p. 2026.

Bonner sent Robin Caly (Robin Papist) to bring Alexander Wimshurst before him. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Robin Caly apprehended Alexander Wimshurst. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

[Also known as Robin Papist.]

 
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Thomas Gilford

Merchant. Of Poole, Dorset.

Thomas Gilford berated William Geffre for his treatment of Maundrel. 1563, p. 1734, 1583, p. 2144.

 
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William Geffre [or Geoffrey or Jeffrey]

D. C. L. (1540) [Foster]. Chancellor of Salisbury (1554 - 1558). [Fasti]

William Geffre took part in the examination of John Maundrel, John Spicer and William Coberley. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He presented articles against John Maundrel, John Spicer and William Coberley. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

He was assisted in the questioning of John Maundrel, John Spicer and William Coberley by the sheriff, John St John, and the priests of Fisherton Anger. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

William Cobberley was held in the stocks until the service he was trying to disrupt in Keevil was over, handed over to a justice and then transported to Salisbury to appear before John Capon and William Geffre. 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1894.

Julins Palmer's second examination at Newbury was before Dr Geffre (chancellor of Salisbury), John Winchcomb, esquire, Sir Richard Abridges, Sir William Rainford [in 1576 and 1583], and the parson of Englefield. 1570, pp. 2121-23, 1576, pp. 1844-46,1583, pp. 1938-40.

William Holcot was charged with treason by Cole and Geffre for supporting Cranmer. 1583, p. 2135.

The examinations of John Hunt and Richard White before the bishops of Salisbury and Gloucester (Brookes and Capon), Dr. Geffre (chancellor) took place on 26 April 1557. 1570, p. 2254, 1576, p. 1947, 1583, p. 2054.

A beggar was sent to Geffre to be whipped for not attending mass in Collingborough. 1570, p. 2265, 1576, p. 1955, 1583, p. 2062.

Geffre died not long after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1991, 1583, p. 2101.

His death prevented his examination of 90 people who had been expected to appear before him. 1563, p. 1706, 1570, p. 2299, 1576, p. 1990. 1583, p. 2101.

 
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William Gye

Servant to master Revet [or Renet]. Of London.

William Gye bought a bible and service book from Richard Waterson, who dwelt with Master Duixile in St Paul's Churchyard. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

Richard Waterson was apprehended by Robin Caly, John Hill and John Avales and sent before Bonner. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

Richard Waterson was examined by Story where he was told that £40 would release him from punishment. This was reduced to £10 but eventually a warrant was made to Richard Grafton who was forced to watch the beating of Gye upon a cross at Bridewell. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

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After his beating intercession was made that Gye be forgiven part of his penance. 1563, p. 1730 [incorrectly numbered 1703], 1583, p. 2144.

 
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Ipswich
Ipswich, Ipswiche
NGR: TM 170 440

A borough in the liberty of Ipswich, county of Suffolk. 25 miles south-east by east from Bury St. Edmunds, 69 miles north-east from London. The borough comprises the parishes of St. Clement, St. Helen, St. Lawrence, St. Margaret, St. Mary at Elms, St. Mary at the Quay, St. Mary Stoke, St. Mary at the Tower, St. Mathew, St. Nicholas, St. Peter, St. Stephen, Witham with Thurlstone, and part of Westerfield; all within the Archdeaconry of Suffolk and Diocese of Norwich. St. Clement with St. Helen is a rectory in charge; St. Mary Stoke is a rectory; St. Mathew and St. Stephen are discharged rectories; St. Lawrence, St. Margaret, St. Mary at Elms, St. Mary at Quay, St. Mary at the Tower, St. Nicholas and St. Peter are perpetual curacies

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Poole
Poole
NGR: SZ 015 915

A borough, seaport and market town, being a distinct county of itself, locally in the hundred of Cogdean, Shaston (East) division of the county of Dorset. 28 miles east from Dorchester. The living is a perpetual curacy in the peculiar jurisdiction of the court of Great Canford and Poole, and in the patronage of the Mayor and Corporation.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2167 [2144]

Notes of certayne good men and women persecuted for the Gospell.

God. An other wayes God will refuse thy voluntary oblation, as thus: If so be it that thou hast gotten neuer so truly thy goods, according both to the lawes of God and man, and hast with the same goodes not relieued thy poore neighbour, when thou hast seene him hungry, thirstie, and naked, he will not take thy oblation when thou shalt offer the same, because he will say vnto thee: When I was hūgry, thou gauest me no meat: When I was thirstie, thou gauest me no drinke: and when I was naked, thou didst not clothe me. Wherfore I will not take thy oblation, because it is none of thine. I left it thee to relieue thy poore neighbors, and thou hast not therein done according vnto this my commaundement, misericordiam volo & non sacrificium, 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Latimer in a sermon.
Foxe text Latin

misericordiam volo & non sacrificium.

Foxe text translation

I had rather haue mercy done, than sacrifice [or oblation].

I had rather haue mercy done, then sacrifice or oblation. Wherfore vntil thou doest the one more then the other, I will not accept thine oblation. Euermore bestow the greatest partes of thy good in workes of mercy, & the lesse part in voluntary workes. Voluntary workes bee called all maner of offering in the Churche, except your foure offring dayes: and your tythes, setting vp candles, gilding and paynting, building of Churches, geuing of ornamēts, going on pilgrimages, making of high wayes and such other be called voluntary workes, which works be of themselues maruellous good, and conuenient to bee done. Necessary workes, and workes of mercy are called the commaundementes, the foure offering dayes, your tithe and such other that longeth to the commaundementes: and workes of mercy consisteth in relieuing and vysiting thy poore neighbors. Nowe then, if men be so foolish of themselues, that they will bestow the most part of theyr good in voluntary workes, which they be not bounde to keepe, but willingly, and by theyr deuotion, and leaue the necessary workes vndone, which they are bounde to doe, they and all theyr voluntary workes are like to goe vnto euerlasting damnation. And I promise you, if you builde a hundred Churches, geue as much as you can make, to gilding of Sayntes, and honouring of the Church, and if thou goe as many pilgrimages as thy body can well suffer, and offer as great candles as okes, if thou leaue the workes of mercye and commaundementes vndone, these workes shall nothing auaile thee. No doubt the voluntary workes be good, & ought to be done: but yet they must be so done, that by theyr occasion the necessary workes, and the workes of mercy be not decayed, and forgotten: if thou wilt builde a glorious Church vnto God, see first your selues to be in charity with your neighbours, & suffer not them to be offended by your works. Thē when you come into your parish Churche, you bring with you the holy temple of God: as Saynt Paule sayth, you your selues be the very holy temples of God, and Christ sayth by his Prophet: in you I wil rest, and intend to make my mansion and abiding place: agayne, if you list to gild and paynt Christ in your Churches, and honour him in vestimentes, see that before your eyes the poore people dye not for lacke of meat, drinke, and clothing. Then do you decke the very true temple of God, and honour him in rich vestures, that will neuer be worne, and so forth vse your selues according vnto the commaundementes: and then finally set vp your candles, & they will report what a glorious light remayneth in your hartes: for it is not fitting to see a dead man light candles. Then I say go your pilgrimages, builde your materiall Churches, doe all your voluntary workes, & they will then represent vnto God, and testify with you, that you haue prouided him a gloryous place in your hartes. But beware I say agayne, that you doe not runne so farre into your voluntarye workes that ye do quite forget your necessary workes of mercye, which you are bound to keepe: you must haue euer a good respect vnto the best and worthiest workes toward God, to be done first and with more efficacy, and the other to be done secondarilye. Thus if you doe with the other that I haue spoken of before, you may come according to the tenor of your cardes, and offer your oblations and prayers to our Lord Iesu Christ, who will both heare and accept them to your euerlasting ioy and glory, to the whiche he bring vs, and all those whom he suffered deathe for. Amen.

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¶ A note of William Gie. 
Commentary  *  Close

This account was reprinted from the appendix to the 1563 edition.

ONe William Gie seruant with Mayster Reuet marchant, bought a Bible and seruice booke of Richard Waterson, who then dwelt with maister Duixle in Pauls Churchyarde, and one Spilman bound the booke: and when the sayd Gye had enquired for the sayde Richard to haue his booke at Duxele, aunswer was made that hee was not within, and so the sayde Gie went his way to Spilmans for the booke: and because it was not done left

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it there, and immediately searche was made in Spilmans house, and the sayd bible and seruice booke was founde & caryed to Boner then Bishop of London, hee hauing the bookes commaunded Spilman for the binding thereof to Lollardes tower, and as Cluny went for the key therof Spilman conueyed himselfe awaye. After that Waterson and Gie being apprehended by Robin Caly, Iohn Hil, & Iohn Auales, and being two dayes in the Counter, were brought before Boner and other Commissioners. Beyng examined D. Story demanded Gye: Wherfore he bought the Bible. He aunswered to serue God withal. Then said Boner: our Lady matines would serue a christen man to serue God. The Bible sayd Story, would breed heresies: a bibble babel were more fit thee. So they concluded that eyther of them shoulde haue xl. stripes lacking one, and Boner sayd it was the law. And they sayd to Waterson, if he would pay xl. poūd, he should be released of his stripes at length they came to x. li. & when they saw he would not they made a warrāt to mayster Grafton, and sent Waterson and Gie to Bridewell to be beaten vpon the Crosse. And because the matter shoulde not be slightly handled, Story was sent with thē to see it done. Gie being whipped vpon the Crosse, intercession was made that he might be forgeuen part of his penaunce.

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¶ A note of Michaels wyfe. 
Commentary  *  Close

This account was reprinted from the appendix to the 1563 edition.

 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 725, line 14

This is Michael Trunchfield's wife, mentioned before.

MarginaliaReferre this to the pag. 1893.MIchaels wife afore mcntioned pag. 1893. being prisoner in Ipswiche for religion, resorted dayly from the prison to her husbandes house, and returned agayn, keeping fayth and promise. And her husband thereat beyng fearefull, she would comfort him, saying: she came not to trouble him, neither shoulde hee susteyne trouble by her. Wherfore she would will him to be of good cheare, for her comming was of good will to see him and her children, & not to bring him into trouble, but to shew her duety therin while she might haue libertie.

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¶ A note of Iohn Spycer. 
Commentary  *  Close

This account was reprinted from the appendix to the 1563 edition.

MarginaliaThis belongeth to the pag. 1894.IN Queene Maryes time, there was one Iohn Spicer, of whome mention is made pag. 1894. he being at the stake ready to geue his lyfe for the truth, a bagge of gonpouder was brought him by his sonne. And an other stāding by (one named maister Beckinham) tooke the gonpowder of his sonne, and put it vnder the girdle of þe sayd Spicer, and exhorted him to be strong in the Lord: also diuers of the sheriffes seruaunts comforted him in like maner, and desired him not to faynt. Vnto whome Spicer aunswered. Doubt ye not of me (sayth he) my soule is quiet: but be you strong and stand fast in the Lord Iesus, and commit your selfe to him in þe confession of his holy name and profession of his truth.

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¶ A note of Mandrell. 
Commentary  *  Close

This account was reprinted from the appendix to the 1563 edition.

MarginaliaReferre this to the pag. 1894.MAndrell standing at the stake as is mentoned before, pag. 1894. Doctor Ieffray the Chauncellour spake to him, wishing him to yelde to the Doctoures, who many hundreth yeares had taught otherwise then hee doth beleue. &c. Vnto whome Mandrell aunswered. M. Chauncellour sayd he, trouble me with none of youre Doctours whatsoeuer they say: but bring me the booke of God the olde Testament and the new, and I will aunswere you. What sayest thou Mandrel (quod he) by the sayntes in the Church, the image of our Lady, of the crucifixe, and other holy Sayntes? be they not necessary. &c. yes M. Chauncellour, sayd hee, very necessary to rost a shoulder of mutton. Then Doctor Billing, a frier once, standing by, sayd. Mayster Chauncellour, quod hee, heare howe these heretickes speake agaynst the crucifixe and the holy crosse, and yet the holy Crosse is mentioned in all the tongues, both Hebrew, Greek, and Latine. For in Latine it is called t. in Greeke tau &c. Whereupon one Thomas Gilford, a marchaunt of Poole standing by, sayd: ah mercifull Lord, sayd he, is not this a maruellous matter for a poore man thus to be charged and put to the paynes of fire for t. tau?

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When Maundrell and Spicer were examined before the Chauncellour, the Chauncellour called them, saying. Come on, come on, sayth he, thou Spicer art to blame, for thou haste taught Maundrell these heresies. Thou arte by thy occupation a Brickeleyer: Yea that I am. And can sing in the Quyre: Yea, that I can sayth he. And can play on the Orgaynes. True sayth hee. Well then sayde the Chauncellour, and thou hast marred this poore man and hast taught him all these heresies. No Mayster Chauncellour (quoth he) I haue not taught him, but I haue read to him. He is able thankes be to God, to teache both you and me.

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¶ A
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