Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Dick Adams

A repentant thief.

Adams was asked by Mistress Harris, a schoolmaster's wife, to remember the sacrament when he was about to be hanged. Adams rebuffed her and died deriding the sacrament. 1563, p. 1736, 1583, p. 2145.

 
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Elizabeth Pepper

(1526? - 1556)

Wife of Thomas Pepper. Martyr. Of parish of St James', Colchester.

On 6 June 1556 Darbyshire, Bonner's chancellor, read articles against Elizabeth Pepper (essentially the same as those against Thomas Whittle), to which she gave answers. 1563, pp. 1523-24, 1570, p. 2095, 1576, p. 1808, 1583, pp. 1914-16.

She signed a letter written with her fellow sufferers that berated Feckenham for preaching against them on 14 June 1556. 1563, pp. 1526-27, 1570, p. 2097, 1576, pp. 1809-10, 1583, p. 1916.

She was imprisoned at Newgate and burned at Stratford-le-Bow on 27 June 1556. 1563, p. 1525, 1570, p. 2097, 1576, p. 1808, 1583, p. 1916.

Elizabeth Pepper was eleven weeks pregnant when she was burned. Mrs Bosome asked why she had not said anything and Elizabeth said that her persecutors knew of her pregnancy. 1563, p. 1734, 1583, p. 2145.

 
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Francis Mallet

(d. 1570)

Master of St Katherine's. Canon of Westminster (1554 - 1556). Dean of Lincoln (1554 - 1570) (Fasti).

In 1556, Dr Mallet asked Gertrude Crokhay why she would not let in St Nicholas. 1563, p. 1740, 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2145.

 
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Gertrude Crokhay

Wife of Robert Crokhay. Of St Katherine's, London.

Dr Mallet (now dean of Lincoln) asked Gertrude Crokhay why she would not let in St Nicholas. 1563, p. 1740, 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2144.

She answered for a child that was baptised by Thomas Saunders in a secret protestant baptism. 1563, p. 1740, 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2144.

She fled to Gelderland to the lands of her first husband, who was Gelder born. These lands were to come to her children. 1563, p. 1740, 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2144.

Coming home via Antwerp, Crokhay met with John Johnson, a Dutch shipper (alias John de Villa), who accused her of being an anabaptist. 1563, p. 1740, 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2144.

Crokhay was taken to prison in Antwerp.1563, p. 1740, 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2144.

Johnson lied and said that Crokhay's husband owed him money for a ship.1563, p. 1741, 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2144.

Crokhay witnessed the drowning of several of her fellow prisoners, and fear of the same fate made her ill, an illness from which she eventually she died. 1563, p. 1741, 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2144.

She denied, in Dutch, being an anabaptist and was eventually delivered out of prison and returned to England. 1563, p. 1741, 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2144.

When she was very ill, attempts were made by Drs Mallet and West to get her to recant and receive the church's rites, but she refused. She died on 13 April. 1583, p. 2144.

 
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John Johnson

A Dutch shipper.

Coming homeward via Antwerp, Gertrude Crokhay met with John Johnson who accused her of being an anabaptist. 1563, p. 1740, 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2082.

[Alias John de Villa]

 
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John Rough

(d. 1557)

Minister. Martyr. Born in Scotland. Of Stirling. (DNB)

John Rough was originally a Black Friar in Stirling for sixteen years until the time when Lord Hamilton (earl of Arran) sued the archbishop of St Andrews. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

Rough was in the service of Hamilton for just one year. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

Rough was sent to preach in Ayr for four years. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

After the death of the David Beaton, he went to St Andrews. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

He was assigned a pension of £20 by Henry VIII. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

After the battle of Musselborough he went to Carlisle, then on to the duke of Somerset. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

He was sent as preacher to Carlisle, Berwick and Newcastle. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

He married in Newcastle. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

Rough was called by the archbishop of York to the benefice of Hull, where he remained until the death of Edward VI. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

He fled to Norden in Friesland upon the accession of Mary. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

He came to London on 10 November 1557. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2225, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

Foxe relates John Rough's sermon about and conversation with Dr Watson in which Rough berated Watson for his doctrinal beliefs. 1563, p. 1734.

Rough was betrayed by Roger Sergeant, a tailor. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2226, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

Rough was arrested by the vice-chamberlain of the queen's house at the Saracen's Head in Islington with Cuthbert Symson and Hugh Foxe on 12 December 1557. They had pretended to be there to hear a play but were actually reading their communion books. 1563, p. 1653, 1570, p. 2231, 1576, p. 1926, 1583, p. 2034.

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On 15 December 1557 a letter was sent by the archbishop of York, the earl of Shrewsbury, Edward Hastings, Anthony Montague, John Bourne and Henry Jerningham (members of the privy council) to Bishop Bonner along with the examinations of John Rough. They sent Rough to Newgate. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2226, 1576, pp. 1921-22., 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

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Articles were brought against him and he answered. 1563, pp. 1647-48, 1570, pp. 2226-27, 1576, pp. 1922-23, 1583, pp. 2029-30.

Rough attended the burning of Austoo at Smithfield. On his way home he met with Master Farrar, a merchant of Halifax, who asked him where he had been. 1563, p. 1648, 1570, p. 2227, 1576, p. 1923, 1583, p. 2034.

Rough was burned at London on 22 December 1557. 1563, p. 1735, 1570, p. 2227, 1576, p. 1923, 1583, p. 2030.

He wrote a letter to his godly friends. 1570, p. 2227, 1576, p. 1923, 1583, p. 2030.

He wrote a letter to the congregation two days before he burned. 1583, pp. 2030-31.

 
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Mistress Harris

A schoolmaster's wife.

Dick Adams was asked by Mistress Harris, a schoolmaster's wife, to remember the sacrament when he was about to be hanged. Adams rebuffed her and died deriding the sacrament. 1563, p. 1736, 1583, p. 2145.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mrs Bosome

Wife of Bosome. Of Richmond, Surrey.

Mrs Bosome was called upon to go to church whilst at her mother's house in Richmond. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

She and her mother eventually attended church and she behaved herself accordingly, but they were apprehended by the constable and the churchwarden, named Sanders, who commanded them to appear the following day in Kingston. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

In the ferry across to Kingston, they met the constable and churchwarden , who later lamented to the ferryman that they had let the women pass through their hands. The ferryman told this to the women, who escaped. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

[Source for a story about Elizabeth Pepper.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Darbyshire

(1518 - 1604)

Nephew of Edmund Bonner. Jesuit. DCL (1556). Prebend of Totenhall (1543), Hackney (1554). Rector of Fulham (1558) and St Magnus, near London Bridge (1558). Principal of Broadgates College, archdeacon of Essex (1558). Chancellor of London. Deprived of all preferments under Elizabeth. (DNB; Foster)

Darbyshire told Thomas Hawkes that the Bible was sufficient for salvation, but not instruction. 1563, p. 1149; 1570, p. 1759; 1576, p. 1551 [recte 1503]; 1583, p. 1586

On 6 June 1556, Darbyshire, Bonner's chancellor, read articles against Henry Adlington, Thomas Bowyer, Lyon Cawch, John Derifall, Agnes George, William Halliwell, Edmund Hurst, Ralph Jackson, Lawrence Parnam, Elizabeth Pepper, John Routh, George Searles, and Henry Wye. 1563, p. 1524, 1570, p. 2095, 1576, p. 1808, 1583, p. 1914.

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Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2097.

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Five who were martyred at Smithfield on April 12 1557 were first examined by Darbyshire, Bonner's chancellor. 1563, pp. 1567-70, 1570, pp. 2159-61, 1576, pp. 1865-67, 1583, pp. 1974-76.

Ralph Allerton was examined on 7 July by Darbyshire. 1563, p. 1626, 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1908, 1583, p. 2016.

Articles against six martyred at Brentford were administered by Thomas Darbyshire on 20 June 1558. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2240, 1576, p. 1935, 1583, p. 2042.

Darbyshire examined William Living and his wife. 1563, p. 1673.

Sentence against them was read by Darbyshire in the presence of Edward Hastings and Thomas Cornwallis. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2241, 1576, p. 1935, 1583, p. 2039.

 
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Thomas Saunders

Of St Katherine's, London.

Thomas Saunders' child was given a secret protestant baptism. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2082.

 
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Stratford (Stratford Langthorne)

Newham, east London

OS grid ref: TQ 375 835

2168 [2145]

A note of one Gertrude Crokhay, troubled for the Gospell.
¶ A note of Elizabeth Pepper. 
Commentary  *  Close

This account was reprinted from the appendix to the 1563 edition.

 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 726

The "Note" of Elizabeth Pepper need not have been printed here, as it will be found inserted in its proper place above. This "Note" is from the Appendix to Edition 1563, p. 1707; but was not reprinted in the Appendix to any subsequent Edition, nor even inserted in its right place, till 1583.

MarginaliaReferre this to the page. 1916.ELizabeth Pepper before mentioned, pag. 1916. when she was burned at Stratford, was xj. weekes gone wt child, as she then testified to one Bosomes wife, who then vnloosed her neckerchiefe, saying moreouer whē she was asked, why she did not tell them, aunswered, why (quoth she) they know it well enough. Oh suche is the bloudy hartes of this cruell generation, that no occasion can stay them from their mischieuous murdering of the saintes of the Lord, that truly professe Christ cucified onely, and alone, for the satisfaction of their sinnes.

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¶ A note of one confessing Gods truth at the Gallowes. 
Commentary  *  Close

This account was reprinted from the appendix to the 1563 edition.

A Notorious fellone, one Dick Adams, beyng vpon the gallowes making his confession, and ready to be caste downe from the ladder, was desired at that instant by one maistres Harries the Grammer schoolemaisters wyfe, to remember the blessed sacrament before he died, to whome the said Adams sayde: marrie maistresse neuer in better tyme, who went vp to the toppe of the ladder, and sayde it was the most abhominable idoll that euer was, and willed all men to take it so: for we haue bene greatly deceyued thereby. Whereupon the Shiriffe caused him to holde his peace, and to take his death patiently. He went down to his place and was cast from the ladder, speaking to his last worde, that it was an abhominable Idoll, his bodye therfore was buryed out of the Church yarde by the high way, who although he was a chiefe in his life, yet he earnestly repented thereof, that I doubt not but he dyed the childe of God, and not vnworthy to be put in the register of the Lordes accepted Confessors.

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¶ A note of Gertrude Crokehay.

MarginaliaReferre this to the page 1955. and to the yeare of the Lord 1556.IN the late dayes of queene Mary, among other straūge dealinge of the Papistes with the faythfull, this is not with the rest to be forgotten that a godly Matrone named Gertrude Crokhay, the wife of Mayster Robert Crokehay dwellinge then at S. Katherins by the Tower of London, absteyned her selfe from the Popish church. And she being in her husbands house it happened in an. 1556. that the foolish popishe Saynt Nicholas went aboute the Parish, which she vnderstanding shut her doores agaynst him, and would not suffer him to come within her house. Then Doctor Mallet hearing therof (and being thē maister of the sayd Saint Katherins) the next day came to her with xx. at his tayle, thinking belike to fray her, and asked why she would not the night before let in Saynt Nicholas, and receiue his blessing. &c. To whom she aunswered thus. Syr, I know no Saynt Nicholas, sayd she, that came hither, Yes quoth Mallet, here was one that represēted S. Nicolas. In deed sir, sayd she, here was one that is my neighbours childe, but not S. Nicholas. For S. Nicholas is in heauen, I was afrayd of them that came with him to haue had my purse cutte by them. For I haue heard of men robbed by Saint Nicholas Clerkes. &c. So Mallet perceiuing nothing to be gotten at her handes, went his way as he came, and she for that time so escaped.

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Then in an. 1557. a litle before Whitsontide it happened that the sayd Gertrude aunswered for a childe that was baptised of one Thomas Saunders, whiche childe was christened secretly in a house after the order of the seruice booke in king Edwardes time, and that being shortly knowne to her enemies, she was sought for, which vnderstanding nothing therof, wēt beyond the sea into Gelderland for to see certayne lands that should haue come to her childrē in the right of her first husband, who was a straūger borne. And being there about a quarter of a yeare, at the length comming homeward by Antwarpe, chaunced to meet with one Iohn Iohnson, a dutch man, alias Iohn De wille of Antwarpe, shipper, who seing her there, went of malice to the Margraue, and accused her to be an Anabaptist, whereby she was taken and caried to prison. The cause why this noughtye man did thus, was for that hee claymed of Mayster Crokhay her husband a piece of money which was not his due, for a shippe, that the sayd master Crokhay bought of him: and for that he could not get it, wrought this displeasure. Well, she being in prison, lay there a fortnight: in whiche time she sawe some, that were Prisoners there, who priuily were drowned in Renishe wine fattes, and after secretly put in sackes and cast into the Riuer. Now she, good woman, thinking to be so serued, tooke thereby such feare that it brought the beginning of her sickenes, of the which at length she dyed.

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Then at the last she was called before the Margraue

and charged with Anabaptistrye, which shee there vtterly denyed, & detested the error, declaring before him in dutch her fayth boldly, without any feare. So the Margraue hearing the same, in the ende being well pleased with her profession, at the sute of some of her frendes deliuered her out of prison, but tooke away her booke, and so she came ouer into England agayne. And being at home in her husbandes house, he thinking to finde meanes to gette her to go abroad, made one Vicars a yeoman of the Tower hys frend, who was great with Boner, to worke that liberty for her. Now this Vicars making meanes to Boner for the same, Boner put the matter ouer to Darbishyre hys Chauncellour, who enioyned her to geue certeyne money to poore folkes, and to goe on the Wednesday and sonday after to Church to Euensong, which she so did, and afterward had such trouble in her conscience thereby, that shee thought verely God had cast her off, and that she shoulde be damned and neuer saued, so not long after this it happened mayster Rough of whom mention is made Page 2034. MarginaliaRead before pag. 2034. came to her house, vnto whō she made mone of her vnquietnes for going to Church, and desired his counsell what she might doe, that should best please God and ease her troubled soule &c. Vnto whō M. Rough replied many comfortable sentences of scripture to comfort her, and in the end gaue her counsell to goe to the christian congregation, which secretly the persecuted had, and confesse her fault vnto them, and so to be receiued into theyr felowship agayne: which hearing that, was glad and entended so to do, and so woulde haue done if sore sicknes had not immediatly preuented the same. But when doctor Mallet heard by one Robert Hemminges, Woodmonger, that she laye very sicke in deede, which Hemminges was her great enemy, he came to her twise to perswade her to recant and to receiue (as the Papistes terme it) the rites of the Church. Vnto whom she aunswered she could not, nor would, for that she was subiect to vomet and therfore he would not, (she was sure she sayd) haue her, to cast vp theyr God agayne, as she should do if she did receiue it. And so immediatly vometed in deed, wherfore he seing that, went frō her into the hall to her daughter named Clare sacke, and tolde her, if her mother would not receiue, she should not be buryed in christian burial, as he termed it. Then Clare went and tolde her sicke mother what he sayde vnto her. Which hearing the same, spake these wordes following. Oh (sayd she) how happy am I, that I shall not rise wyth them, but agaynst them. Well (quoth she) the earth is the Lordes and all that therein is, and therfore I commit the matter to him. &c.

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Shortly hereupon, that is the 27. day of March 1558. the sayd Doctor Mallet came agayne to her with one D. West Queene Maryes Chapleyne. And comming in, hee saluted her, and tolde her that he had brought her a good learned man to perswade her, who was one of þe queenes Chapleines. &c. and therefore he desired her to heare and beleue him, in that he should say. &c. Then D. West exhorted her to receiue theyr Sacrament, and to be aneled, for he sayd, she was strong enough for it. &c. Vnto whom she aunswered, that shee was able and strong enough to receiue it in deede, but she woulde not, for that it was abhominable. &c. Then sayd West, ye be in an ill minde: doe ye thinke to dye a christian woman? yea sayd she that I do. I pray you sayd West, how came you first into that opinion. Mary (sayd she) there he is that first taught me (meaning D. Mallct) at the mariage of my brother & his sister, where I heard him earnestly preach this doctrine, whiche I now do holde. And if God shall lay our sinnes to our charge, if we repent not, muche more damnable is his offence, being once a publicke Preacher of the same, & nowe to turne from it. Then Mallet tolde her he was then deceiued, by little newfangled two peny bookes, as you bee now (sayd he) but now I am otherwise perswaded, as I would haue you, and to receiue the Sacrament, whiche if you would, you should, I warrant you be saued, my soule for yours. At those wordes she earnestly desired them to be content, for sayth she, ye be come to rob and draw me from my Christ, which I tell you truth you shall not doe, for I will neuer consent to you while I liue. When West heard her saye so, he drewe his stoole nigher to heare her speake, and being dronken, he fell downe, whereby Mallet was fayne to helpe him vp agayne, and so immediatly after they departed thence. And the xiij. day of Aprill next after that, she dyed constantly in the Lord, and yelded her soule and life into his holy handes, with these wordes. Oh Lord into thy handes receiue my soule, and so immediatly gaue vp her life vnto the Lord, to whome be prayse for euer. Amen.

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While she was beyond sea, as is sayd before, Mayster Crokhay her husband, by the procurement of D. Mallet,

was
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