Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Agnes Prest

Married woman. Martyr. Of Exeter.

James Turberville examined and condemned Agnes Prest. 1563, p. 1737, 1570, p. 2249, 1576, p. 1943-45, 1583, p. 2049.

Gregory Basset denounced Mrs Prest for talking of scriptures even though she was uneducated. 1563, p. 1737, 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

Walter Raleigh's wife visited Mrs Prest in prison in Exeter in 1558. 1563, p. 1737, 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

Mrs Prest was taken from this prison to the Guildhall in Exeter to be condemned. 1563, p. 1737, 1570, p. 2251, 1576, p. 1943, 1583, p. 2049.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Blackstone

Chancellor of Exeter (1555). (Fasti)

Blackstone examined and condemned Agnes Prest. 1570, p. 2249, 1576, p. 1943-45, 1583, p. 2049.

When entertaining his concubine and her friends, he would send for Mrs Prest to mock her for their amusement. 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Griffith

Sheriff of Bristol.

John Griffith oversaw the burning of martyrs in Bristol. 1563, p. 1736.

Griffith prepared green wood for William Saxton's burning on 18 September. John Pikes took pity on him and brought helm sheaves from a town half a mile away, and Saxton died with little pain. 1583, p. 2148.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Raynoldes

(1505? - 1559)

Dean of Exeter (1554 - 1559). Bishop-elect of Hereford when Mary died. He never obtained possession. (Foster)

Raynoldes and Blackstone, chancellor of Exeter, persecuted Agnes Prest. 1583, p. 2148.

Thomas Raynoldes died in prison. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Dalby

(fl. 1536 - 1560)

Fellow of All Souls College (1536). B.C.L. (1538). Chancellor of Bristol. Prebend of Bristol. Held several Gloucestershire livings during Mary's reign. Deprived of all livings in 1560. (Emden and Fasti)

William Saxton was brought before Dalby, who committed him to prison and condemned him. 1583, p. 2148.

Thomas Benion was brought by a constable before Dalby on 13 August 1557. 1570, p. 2252, 1576, p. 1945, 1583, p. 2052.

Thomas Benion was examined and condemned by Dalby on 20 August 1557. 1570, p. 2252, 1576, pp. 1945-46, 1583, p. 2053.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Astley
Asteley Parke
NGR: SP 311 891

Astley is a parish in the Kirby division of the hundred of Knightlaw, county of Warwick. 4.5 miles west-south-west from Nuneaton. The living is a perpetual curacy in the Archdeaconry of Coventry, diocese of Coventry and Lichfield. A short distance to the north is an old mansion house, erected in the sixteenth century.

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There are also Astleys in Lancashire, Shropshire and Worcestershire

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Bristol
Bristoll, Brystoll, Bristow, Bristowe
NGR: ST 590 730

A city and county of itself, between the counties of Gloucester and Somerset. 34 miles south-west by south from Gloucester, 12 miles north-west from Bath. Bristol is the seat of a diocese, established in 1542. The city comprises the parishes of All Saints, St. Augustine, Christ Church, St. Owen, St. John Baptist, St. Leonard, St. Mary le Port, St. Mary Redcliffe, St. Michael, St. Nicholas, St. Peter, St. Werburgh, St. Stephen and St. Thomas. Also the Temple parish, and parts of St. James, St. Paul, St. Philip and St. Jacob. All are within the peculiar jurisdiction of the bishop. Christ Church, St. John Baptist, St. Mary le Port, St. Michael, St. Peter, St. Stephen and St. Werburgh are discharged rectories. St. Leonard, St. Mary Redcliffe, St. Nicholas, The Temple, St. Philip and St. Jacob are discharged vicarages. St. James and St. Thomas are perpetual curacies, the latter annexed to the vicarage of Bedminster, Archdeaconry of Bath, Diocese of Bath and Wells.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Coton
Coton by Nuneaton
NGR:

Not identified, suggest;

SP 342 905 - Coton Lawn; or

SP 358 910 - Chilvers Coton

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Exeter
NGR: SX 920 925

A city and county of itself, locally in the hundred of Wanford, county of Devon, of which it is the chief town. 10 miles north-north-west from Exmouth, 44 miles north-east from Plymouth. The city comprises 17 parishes, two chapelries, and the extra-parochial precinct of the cathedral; all in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Exeter, of which the town is the seat. 14 of the livings are discharged rectories; St John is a rectory not in charge; St David and St Sidwell are perpetual curacies.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Launceston
Launceston
NGR: SX 332 847

A borough, market town and parish, possessing separate jurisdiction, locally in the northern division of the hundred of East, county of Cornwall. 20.5 miles north-east by east from Bodmin. The living is a perpetual curacy in the Archdeaconry of Cornwall, diocese of Exeter

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Nuneaton
Nunne Eaton
NGR: SP 356 920

A market town and parish in the Atherstone division of the hundred of Hemlingford, county of Warwick. 18 miles north-north-east from Warwick. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Coventry, diocese of Coventry and Lichfield.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Redland, Bristol
Ridland
NGR: ST 580 570

Suggest: Redland, near Bristol

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2172 [2149]

Cautions to the Reader. A note of Prestes wyfe.

and will not the death of a sinner, but that he be conuerted and liue. Here the godly othe certifieth vs of forgeuenes, & requireth an vnfayned conuersion vnto God, that is, that men acknowledge in hart theyr wicked liuing & be sory, that euer they haue with wicked lyuyng offended agaynst that so good and louing a father, and truste to haue forgeuenes through Christes bloud, and fully and firmely set theyr hartes to serue GOD, and to walke the wayes of his commaundementes all the dayes of theyr life. Then shall we be the true Christians, built vpon the corner stone Christ, not wauering or chaunging at euery puffe of winde, not seeking an Epicurish life in all voluptuous and vaine vanitie, not rauening extortioning, or with vsury oppressing the poore and nedy, but stedfast, vnmoueable, liuing in the feare of Gods iudgementes, and trust vpon his mercy, mortifying our brutish and carnall lustes, being mercifull and helpeful to the poore and nedy, wayting for the blessed time when Christ shall call vs, to be ready & accepted before him. Our merciful Lord & good Father graunt vs grace so to doe, for the loue of his deare sonne Iesus Christ, our certayne and most deare Sauior, to whom with the father & the holy ghost, be all honor for euer and euer. Amen.

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Psalme. Cxv.
Precious in the sighte of the Lord is the death of his sayntes.

Apocalips. vi.
These are they which are come out of great troubles, and haue washed theyr clothes, and made them white in the bloude of the lambe.

¶ Certayne Cautions of the Authour to the Reader, of thinges to be considered in reading this story. 
Commentary  *  Close

These corrections (essentially a list of errata) appeared before the title page of the 1570 edition and were transferred to the end of the 1576 edition. They were then reprinted in the appendix to the 1583 edition.

AMongst other escapes and ouersightes in the Edition of this story committed, part of them we leaue to thine owne gentle castigation gentle reader: certaine other specialities there be, whereof wee thought it good and expedient to geue thee warning as hereafter followeth.

MarginaliaCautions of the Author to the Reader.First, when mention is made pag. 34. of Peters being at Rome and suffering at Rome, following certayne Authors: yet forsomuch as other writers there be, & reasons to proue that he was not at Rome. I desire thee therfore that this my affirmation may not preiudice other mens iudgementes, if anye see or can say further in that matter.

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Touching the story of the Turkes, where as I in following our Christian Authours writing of the Turkes, haue noted in the pag. 747. Solymannus to be the 12. Turke, after Ottomannus as they do all record: I haue found since by the computation of the Turkes set forth in the Table of theyr owne descent, the sayde Solymannus to be but þe 6. emperor of the Turks: & this Solimannus his sonne which now reygneth, to be but þt twelfe. Which I thought here to signifie vnto thee, because of theyr own turkish prophecie noted in the pag. 771. lest in construing of that Prophecie being in the same place expounded, thou be deceiued.

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Item 1245. where mayster George Blag is named to be one of the priuie chamber: here is to be noted also that although he were not admitted as one of the priuy chamber yet his ordinary resort thither and to the kinges presence there, was such, as although hee were not one of them, yet was he so commonly taken.

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Item, pag. 1367. in the story of the Duke of Somerset, where it is sayde that at the returne of the Earle of Warwicke out of Norfolke there was a consultation amongst the Lordes assembling themselues together in the house of M. Yorke. &c. agaynst the Duke of Somerset: here is to be noted that the comming of the Lordes to the said house of M. Yorke was not immediately vpon the Duke of Northumberlandes returne, but first hee went to Warwicke, and from thence after a space came to the house aforesayd.

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Item, here is also to be noted touching the sayd Duke of Somerset, that albeit at his death relation is made of a sodeine falling of the people, as was at the taking of christ that is not to be expounded as though I compared in any part the Duke of Somerset with Christ.

And though I do something more attribute to the cōmendation of the sayd Duke of Somerset, which dyed so constantly in his religion, yet I desire thee gentle reader, so to take it, not that I did euer meane to derogate or empeyre the martiall prayse or factes of other men, which also are to be commended in suche thinges where they well deserued.

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Item, touching the same Duke of Somerset, where the story sayth, pag. 1367. he was attaynted, read indited.

Item, pag. 1418. where mention is made of one Ni-

colas Vnderwood to be the betrayer of the Duke of Suffolke: ioyne with the sayd MarginaliaThis Nicholas Vnderwoode dwelleth now at Coton by Nunne Eaton. and Laurence in Nunne Eaton.Vnderwood also Nicolas Laurence, alias Nicolas Ethell keeper of Asteley Parke, who taking vpon him and promising to keepe the Duke, for 2. or three dayes vntill hee might finde some meanes to escape, conueyed him into an hollowe tree, and after moste trayterously bewrayed him.

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Item, fol. 1419. in the Storye of Syr Thomas Wyat there is also to be corrected, that where the story sayth that he was taken by Syr Clement Parson, which was not so, nor he no such knight, amend it thus, that he first came to Clarentius  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 737, fn 2

Rather Clarencieux, one of the heralds. - ED.

being sent vnto him, and afterward yealded him to Syr Mortis Bartly.

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Briefly and in generall, besides these castigations aboue noted, if thou finde any other committed in the printing hereof, gently I desire thee gentle reader, to bestowe a little paynes with thine owne hand to amend them.

Notes omitted of them that were burnt at Bristowe. 
Commentary  *  Close

This account was reprinted from the appendix to the 1563 edition.

MarginaliaReferre this to the pag. 1953. William Sarton Martyr burnt at Bristow.THe viij. daye of August 1953. was brought Wil. Sarton weauer of Bristow, before one Dalbie Chauncellour of Bristow aforesaid, and by him committed to prison and also condemned, for holding that the sacrament was a signe of an holy thing: also he denyed, that the flesh and bloud of Christ is there after their words of consecration: he was burned the xviij. of september. 1556. and as he wēt to the fire, he sang þe Psalmes. The Sheriffe Ioh. Griffith had prepared greene wood to burne him, but one mayster Iohn Pikes pitieng theman, caused diuers to goe wyth him to Ridland, halfe a myle of, who brought good store of helme sheaues, 

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 737, fn 3

"Helme-sheaves," haum or stubble. - ED.

which in deede made good dispatch with little payne, in comparison to that he should haue suffered with the geeene woode. In the meane space, whilest they went for the sheues, the sayde Sarton made many good exhortations to the people, and after dyed constantly and patiently with great ioyfulnes.

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A note of Prestes wyfe of Exceter.

MarginaliaReferre this to the pag. 2051.IN Cornewall not farre from Launceston, within the Dioces of Exceter, in Queene Maryes dayes, dwelled a poore man, whose name was Prest, MarginaliaPrestes wyfe of Exceter Martyr.his wife beyng an honest woman, very simple, but of good zeale and vpright life, being taught by God, in hearing of his worde (albeit it was in those dayes very seldome preached anye where) and feeling a sweete taste thereof, framed her lyfe a new after the rule of the same. And banished quite from her, all the popishe dregges of superstition and hipocrisie, & gaue her selfe wholly to prayer, and inuocating the name of God, both for the afflicted Church of Christ in those dayes very dangerously tost and tormoyled: as also for her own inward contentation, and spirituall consolation, whiche she no little felt to her vnspeakeable ioy, and incomparable comfort. And when some, who before had known her sawe that marueilous chaunge in her, and (as the cruell serpent) enueying her felicitie, went vpō the same immediately and accused her to certayn Iustices of the shire, being extreme enemies to the truth and very persecutors of the same, who taking the matter in hande, as very glad of such occasion, sent for her to the place where she was, and began at the second, if not at the first dash, to demaund her beliefe in theyr popish sacrament of the aulter.

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The good poore woman, who had learned, not to bee ashamed to confesse her mayster Christ, before menne, and to render accōptes of her fayth, when it was asked, tould freely and franckly her opinion therein, and hid backe nothing, that eyther shee thought might profite them, if they had anye grace to receiue it, or els might sounde to Gods glory and prayse, though it were neuer so muche by them threatned and rebuked. Whereupon shee was forthwyth committed to the Gayle of Launceston, where she remayned a quarter of a yeare, or thereaboutes, and afterwards was dispatched of that vile and filthy prison, and deliuered ouer to the handes of two champions of the Popes, þe one called MarginaliaDoctour Raynoldes Deane of Exceter and Maister Blackston treasurer of the Churche of Exceter popishe persecutours.Doctor Raynoldes, Deane of Exceter, and the other named mayster Blaxton, treasurer of þe same chuch men surely feruent hote in the furtheraunce of the romysh affayres, and in withstanding the truth of the pure euangelicall gospell. So the time that this good poore woman was vnder theyr handes, shee had many sore conflictes by them. And the sayd Blaxton hauing a Concubine, whiche sondry tymes resorted to him, with other of his gossippes alwayes when they came, this sayde good woman was called forth to his house, and there to make his minion with the rest of his company some mirth, hee woulde examine her, with such mocking maner, in deriding the truth that it would haue vexed any christian soule to haue seene

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