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Lewes

A Welshman. Guard.

One day in July [year not filled in in text], a Welshman called Lewes (described as one of the guard) entered the shop where Wilmot was apprentice. Lewes was asked what the news at court was, to which he responded that Crome had appeared before the council and was to appear at Paul's Cross. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

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Wilmot told Lewes that he was sorry to hear the news of Dr Crome. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1951, 1583, p. 2058.

Lewes told Wilmot that there had been troubles since the Bible was translated into English, that Crome was a heretic and then falsely accused Cromwell of biblical translation. 1563, p. 1682, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

Foxe recounts Wilmot's conversation with Lewes. 1563, p. 1683, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

Wilmot told Lewes that Crome preached nothing but the truth. 1563, p. 1683, 1570, p. 2060, 1576, p. 1952, 1583, p. 2058.

A young servant of Daubney spoke to Lewes about what he had heard about the charges against Thomas Fairfax and Richard Wilmot. 1563, p. 1685, 1570, p. 2260, 1576, p. 1953, 1583, p. 2060.

 
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Ramsey

(d. c. 1541)

Martyred at Salisbury with fellow interlude players Richard Spenser and Hewet

Ramsey was charged with heresy about the sacrament of the altar and burnt at Salisbury. 1570, p. 1376; 1576, p. 1174; 1583, p. 1202.

 
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Abingdon
Abyngdon
NGR: SU 495 795

A borough, having separate and exclusive jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Harmer, county of Berkshire, of which it is the chief town. 6 miles south from Oxford, 26 miles north west by north from Reading. The town comprises the parishes of St. Helens and St. Nicholas, both in the Archdeaconry of Berkshire, Diocese of Salisbury. The living of St. Helens is a vicarage, with the sinecure rectory of St. Nicholas annexed.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Battle [Battaile; Batil]

Sussex

OS grid ref: TQ 746 154

 
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Bicester [Ticetir] Priory

Bicester, Oxfordshire

Augustinian priory

OS grid ref: SP 585 225

 
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Bristol
Bristoll, Brystoll, Bristow, Bristowe
NGR: ST 590 730

A city and county of itself, between the counties of Gloucester and Somerset. 34 miles south-west by south from Gloucester, 12 miles north-west from Bath. Bristol is the seat of a diocese, established in 1542. The city comprises the parishes of All Saints, St. Augustine, Christ Church, St. Owen, St. John Baptist, St. Leonard, St. Mary le Port, St. Mary Redcliffe, St. Michael, St. Nicholas, St. Peter, St. Werburgh, St. Stephen and St. Thomas. Also the Temple parish, and parts of St. James, St. Paul, St. Philip and St. Jacob. All are within the peculiar jurisdiction of the bishop. Christ Church, St. John Baptist, St. Mary le Port, St. Michael, St. Peter, St. Stephen and St. Werburgh are discharged rectories. St. Leonard, St. Mary Redcliffe, St. Nicholas, The Temple, St. Philip and St. Jacob are discharged vicarages. St. James and St. Thomas are perpetual curacies, the latter annexed to the vicarage of Bedminster, Archdeaconry of Bath, Diocese of Bath and Wells.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Bury St Edmunds

[St Edmundsbury; Berry; Bery]

West Suffolk

OS grid ref: TL 855 645

Contains a ruined abbey, the shrine of St Edmund

 
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Byland [Biland] Abbey

North Yorkshire

OS grid ref: SE 545 785

 
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Coggeshall
Cocksal, Cocksall, Corksal
NGR: TL 855 230

A market town and parish in the Witham division of the hundred of Lexden, county of Essex. 16 miles north-east from Chelmsford. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Colchester, diocese of London

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Coventry
Couentry
NGR: SP 340 790

An ancient city and a county of itself, locally in the county of Warwick. 10 miles north-east from Warwick, 18 miles south-east from Birmingham. The city comprises the parishes of St. Michael, Holy Trinity and St. John Baptist, all in the Archdeaconry of Coventry, diocese of Coventry and Lichfield. St. Michael and Holy Trinity are vicarages. St. John is a rectory not in charge, annexed to the headmastership of the free school

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Crowland (Croyland) Abbey

[Crouland]

South Holland, Lincolnshire

OS grid ref: TF 245 105

 
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Daventry [Dauentre]

Northamptonshire

OS grid ref: SP 575 625

 
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Dover
Douer
NGR: TR 320 414

One of the Cinq Ports, a borough and a market town, having separate jurisdiction; locally in the Lathe of St Augustine, eastern division of the County of Kent. 16 miles south east by south from Canterbury. Dover formerly consisted of the parishes of St James the Apostle, St John, St Martin the Greater, St Martin the Less, St Mary the Virgin, St Nicholas and St Peter - all subsequently merged into St James and St Mary. The living of St Mary is a perpetual curacy in the peculiar jurisdiction of the Archbishop of Canterbury, and in the patronage of the parishioners. The living of St James is a discharged rectory in the jurisdiction and patronage of the Archbishop

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Dunstable

Bedfordshire

OS grid ref: TL 015 215

 
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Eltham Palace

Eltham, London

OS grid ref: TQ 425 740

 
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Evesham

[Eusham]

Worcestershire

OS grid ref: SP 035 435

 
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Eynsham

[Euisham; Ensham; Egnesham]

Oxfordshire

OS grid ref: SP 435 095

5 miles nw of Oxford on the River Thames; site of Benedictine abbey

 
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Fountains Abbey

North Yorkshire

Cistercian abbey

OS grid ref: SE 275 683

 
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Grimsby [Grimmisby] Abbey

Grimsby, Lincolnshire

Augustinian abbey

OS grid ref: TA 275 095

 
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Hailes Abbey

[Hales; Hayles]

near Winchcombe, Gloucestershire

OS grid ref: SP 050 301

Cistercian abbey founded 1246; possessed a phial of, ostensibly, the blood of Christ

 
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Hertford [Herford; Hartford]

County town of Hertfordshire

OS grid ref: TL 325 125

 
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Huntingdon

[Huntington; Huntyngton]

Cambridgeshire

OS grid ref: TL 245 725

Historic county town of Huntingdonshire

 
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Jervaulx [Gernons] Abbey

nr Ripon, North Yorkshire

Cistercian abbey

OS grid ref: SE 172 856

 
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Leicester Abbey (Abbey of Saint Mary de Pratis)

Leicester

OS grid ref: SK 584 059

Augustinian abbey founded 1143

 
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Lewes
Lewes, Lewys
NGR: TQ 416 095

A borough, chiefly in the hundred and rape of Lewes, county of Sussex, of which it is the chief town. 7 miles north-east by east from Brighton. The borough comprises four parishes; St. Michael' s, which is a discharged rectory; St. Anne's and All Saints, which are the same; and St. John's under the Castle, which is a rectory. All are in the Archdeaconry of Lewes and Diocese of Chichester. The precinct of the castle is extra-parochial

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Malmesbury

[Malmesbery]

Wiltshire

OS grid ref: ST 935 875

 
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Merton Priory (Abbey)

Merton, Surrey

OS grid ref: TQ 265 699

 
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Monmouth (Trefynwy) [Munmorth]

Gwent, Wales

Historic county town of Monmouthshire

OS grid ref: SO 505 125

 
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Northampton
NGR: SP 755 605

A borough having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Spelhoe, county of Northampton, of which it is the chief town. 66 miles north-west by north from London. The town comprises the parishes of All Saints, St Giles, St Peter and St Sepulchre; all in the Archdeaconry of Northampton and Diocese of Peterborough. The livings of St Giles and St Sepulchre are discharged vicarages; All Saints is a vicarage; and St Peter is a rectory with the perpetual curacies of Kingsthorpe and Upton annexed.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Notley

Buckinghamshire

Augustinian abbey

OS grid ref: SP 715 091

 
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Osney

near Oxford, Oxfordshire

OS grid ref: SP 505 065

 
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Pershore [Parchissor] Abbey

Worcestershire

OS grid ref: SO 945 455

 
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Peterborough

[Peterborowe]

Cambridgeshire

OS grid ref: TL 195 995

Cathedral city

 
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Ramsey
Ramesey
NGR: TM 213 303

A parish in the hundred of Tendring, county of Essex. 3 miles west-south-west from Harwich. The living is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Colchester, diocese of London

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Rievaulx [Rauens; Reuans] Abbey

North Yorkshire

Cistercian abbey

OS grid ref: SE 575 855

 
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Shrewsbury [Shrowesbury; Shrosbery; Shreusbury]

County town of Shropshire

OS grid ref: SJ 495 125

 
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Spalding

Lincolnshire

OS grid ref: TF 245 225

 
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St Frideswide Priory

Oxford

OS grid ref: SP 519 065

 
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Swinstead [Swinsted]

Lincolnshire

OS grid ref: TF 015 225

 
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Tewkesbury
NGR: SO 893 325

A borough and parish, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the lower division of the hundred of Tewkesbury, county of Gloucester. 10 miles north-north-east from Gloucester. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Gloucester.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Thorney

Cambridgeshire

OS grid ref: TF 285 045

 
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Thornton [Thorton] Abbey

Lincolnshire

Augustinian abbey

OS grid ref: TA 118 189

 
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Waltham Abbey

[Walthan]

Essex

OS grid ref: TL 385 005

 
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Wimborne Minster

[Winburne]

Dorset

OS grid ref: SU 015 005

 
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Winchcombe

[Wincombe]

Gloucestershire

OS grid ref: SP 022 283

581 [557]

K. Henry. 5. A computation of Church goodes. Popish feastes. L. Cobham persecuted.

uision, that euery towneship should keepe all pore people of their owne dwellers, whych might not labour for theyr liuing: with condition, that it moe fell in a towne then the towne might maintaine, than the said almes houses to relieue such towneships.

MarginaliaA computation of Churche goods, to how much they doe mount.And for to beare these charges, they alledged by theyr sayd bil, þt the temporalties, being in the possession of spiritual men, amounted to iij. C. and xxij. M. marke by yeare. Wherof they affirmed to be in the see of Cant. with the abbaies of Christes church, of S. Augustines, Shrewsbury, Coggeshale, and S. Osus xx. M. marke by yere. In the see of Yorke and Abbeyes there xx. M. marke. In the see of Winchester, and abbeys there xx. M. marke. In the see of London, wt abbeys and other houses there, xx. M. marke. In the see of Lincolne, wyth the abbeys of Peterborowe, Ramsey and other, xx. M. marke. In the see of Norwych, with the abbeys of Bury and other, xx. M. marke. In the see of Ely, Spalding and other, xx. M. marke, In the see of Bathe, wyth the abbey of Okinborne and other, xx. M. marke. In the see of Worcester, wyth the abbeys of Euisham, Abingdon & other, xx. M. marke. In the see of Chester with the precinct of the same, with the sees of s. Dauid, of Salisbury, and Exceter, wyth their prceinctes xx. M. marke. The abbeis of Rauens or Reuans of Fountains, of Gernons, and diuers other to the number of v. moe, xx. M. marke. The abbeys of Leicester, Waltham, Gosborne, Merton, Ticetir, Osney and other, vnto the number of vj. mo, xx. M. marke. The abbeys of Douers, Batil, Lewys, Couentry, Dauentre, & Tourney, xx. M. marke. The abbais of Northhampton, Thortō, Bristow, Killingworth, Winchcombe, Hailes, Parchissor, Frideswide, Notly, and Griminisby, xx. M. marke.

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The which foresaid sommes amount to the full of iij. c. M. marke. And for the odde of xxij. M. marke, they apointed Hardford, Rochester, Huntingdō, Swineshed, Crowland, Malmesbury, Burton, Teukesbury, Dusntable, Shirborne, Taunton and Biland.

And ouer this they alleaged by the sayde bill, that ouer and aboue the said summe of iij. C. and xxij. M. marke, diuers houses of religion in England, possessed as many tēporalties as might suffice to find yerely xv. M. priests and clerks, euery priest to be allowed for his stipend vij. marke by the yeare.

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To the which Bill no answer was made, but that the king of this matter would take deliberation & aduisement, and wyth that answer ended, so that no further labor was made.

MarginaliaAnn. 1413.These things thus hitherto discoursed, touching suche actes and matters as haue bene incident in the lyfe time of this king, 

Commentary  *  Close
Death of Henry IV

Foxe's accounts of the death of Henry IV and the accession of Henry V were both added in the 1570 edition and remained unchanged in subsequent editions. Foxe cited a chronicle that it has been impossible to trace - Foxe only notes that the chronicle began with the words 'That all men called' - for the story of Henry IV's death and the prophecy that he would die in Jerusalem. Undoubtedly Foxe related this story, and went to the trouble of repeating it from a minor chronicle, because it offered an example of the dangers of false prophecy - a topic which Foxe discussed at some length elsewhere (see 1570, pp. 848-52; 1576, pp. 692-4; 1583, pp. 717-19). Foxe drew his account of the accession of Henry V and the 1413 convocation from Thomas of Walsingham's chronicle (see Thomas of Walsingham, Historia Anglicana, ed. H. T. Riley, 2 vols., Rolls Series 28 [London, 1864-5], II, p. 290). But the most remarkable thing about Foxe's account is his declaration that he would not discuss Henry exploits or conquests in France. To almost all Tudor writers Henry V was a great hero, but, because of his persecution of the Lollards, to Foxe he was fundamentally a bad king, not worthy of praise.

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Thomas S. Freeman
University of Sheffield

followeth next the 13. yeare of his raigne. In the which yeare, the sayd king Henry the 4. after that hee had sent a little before a certaine company of captaines & souldiours to aide the duke of Burgundy in Fraunce (among whome was the Lord Cobham) keping his Christenmas at Eltham, fell greeuously sicke. From thence, he was conueied to London, where he began to call a parliament, but taryed not the end. In the meane time, the infirmitie of the king more and more increasing, he was takē and brought into a bed in a fair chamber at Westminster. And as he lay in his bed, he asked how they called the same chamber: and they answered and sayde, Ierusalem. And then he sayde it was his prophecie, that he should make his ende in Ierusalem. Marginalia

The kyng had a prophecie, that he should die in Ierusalem.

Prophecies deceiueable.

And so disposing himselfe towarde hys ende, in the foresayd chamber he died: vpon what sicknesse, whether of leprosie, or some other sharpe disease, I haue not to affirm. MarginaliaEx vetust. Chron. Anglico, cui initium est. That al men called.Ex vetust. Chron. Anglico, cuius initium, That all men called. MarginaliaThe prophecie of pope Syluester. 2.The like prophecy we read, that pope Siluester, 2. pa. 180. to whom being inquisitiue for the time and place where he should die, it was answered, that he shuld die in Ierusalē. Who then saying Masse in a Chappel (called likewise Ierusalem) perceiued his end there to be nere, and died. And thus K. Henry the 4. successor to the lawful K. Richard 2. finished hys life at Westminster, and was buried at Cant. by the tombe of Thomas Becket. &c. An. 1413.

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¶ King Henry the fift.

MarginaliaKing Henry. 5.AFter thys Henry the 4. reigned Henry the 5. hys sonne, which was borne at Munmorth in Wales, of whose other vertues and great victories gotten in Fraunce, I haue not greatly to intermeddle: Especially, seing the memory of hys worthy prowesse, being sufficiently described in other writers in this our time, may both content the reader and vnburden my labor herein. Especially, seing these latter troubles and perturbatious of the Churche offer me somuch, that vnneth any vacant laisure shalbe left, to intermeddle wyth matters prophane,

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MarginaliaGreat tempest at the coronatiō of the new king.After the coronatiō then of this new king, which was the 9. day of April, called then passion Sonday, which was an exceding stormy day, and so tēpestuous, that many did wonder at the portent thereof: not long after the same, a parliament began to be called & to be holden after the feast of Easter, at Westminster An. 1413. At whych time, Thomas Arundel the Archbishop of Canterburie, collected in Paules church at London, MarginaliaA synode called at London.an vniuersal Synode of all the bishops and clergie of England. In that Synode among other weighty matters and ponderous, was determined: MarginaliaS. George and S. Dunstanes day made double feast.that the day of S. George, and also of S. Dunstane should be double feast, called Duplex Festum in holy kitching, in holy Church I would say.

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And because the order and maner of those Pope holy feastes, either yet is not sufficiently knowen to some rude and grosse capacities, or may peraduenture growe out of vse, and to be straunge & vnknowen to our posteritie hereafter: Therfore to geue a litle memorandum therof (by the way for eruditiō of times hereafter to come) touching this misticall science of the Popes deepe and secreate diuinitie: here is to be noted, MarginaliaThe feast of the popes church, described and deuided.that the feastes of the Popes holy mother Catholique churche, be deuided in sondry members: Like as a plentifull roote in a fruitfull fielde riseth vp and burgeneth inot manifold armes, and the armes againe do multiply into diuers and sondry brāches, out of the which moreouer although no frute do come, yet both leaues and flowers doe bud and blossome in most copious wise, right beautifull to beholde: Euen so thys Festum, conteinyng a large matter of great variety of dayes and feasts, groweth to it selfe and multiplieth, being thus deuided: MarginaliaFestum duplex.first into Festrum duplex, and into Festum simplex, that is into feast double, and to feast simple. Againe, thys Festum duplex brauncheth foure folde wise, to wit, into MarginaliaPincipale duplex.Festum principale duplex: into MarginaliaMaius duplex.Maius duplex: into MarginaliaMinus duplex.Minus duplex, and MarginaliaInferius duplex.inferius duplex, that is, in principal double, in greater double, in lesser double, and inferior or lower double. Vnto these seueral sorts of feasts what daies were peculiarly assigned, it were to long to recite. For this present purpose it shall suffice to vnderstand: that as vnto the principall double feast onely belonged 8. daies in the yere: so the Maius duplex festum, had geuen vnto him by thys conuocation, the day of S. George, and of S. Dunstane, as is afore remembred: MarginaliaConstitution against councell. Ex tab. festorumalbeit by constitution it was so decreed, yet by custome it was not so vsed. Item, to be noted, that these two feastes, to witte, Principale duplex, and Maius duplex, did differ and were knowen from all other by foure notes, by seruice in the kitching, and by seruice in the Church, which was both double: by ringing in the steple, which was with double peale: by copes in the quier, and by thurifyeng or censing the aultares. For in these two principall and greater double feasts, the vij. viij. and ix. lesson must be read wyth silken copes. Also at the said feasts in the time of the lessons, the altars in the church must the thurified, that is, smoked with incēse. &c. And likewise the Minus duplex, and Inferius duplex had also their peculiar seruice to them belonging.

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Secondly the MarginaliaSimplex festum. in the popes church.Simplex festum, whych is the secoude arme springing of this diuision, is thus diuided: Eyther hauing a triple inuitorie, or a double, or els a single inuitorie. Of the which moreouer, some haue 3. lessons, some haue 9. &c.

And thus much by occasion for Popish feasts, not that I doe so much deride them, as I lament, that so much and manifest idolatry in them is committed to the great dishonor of our Lord our God, whych is onely to be honoured.

¶ The trouble and persecution of the Lord Cobham.

MarginaliaTrouble of the Lord Cobham. Ex Chron. Monac. Albanensis.BVt to lette this by matter passe, againe to returne to the foresayd vniuersal Synode assembled by Thomas Arundel at S. Paules churche in London, as is before remembred: 

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Sir John Oldcastle

Foxe's first account of Sir John Oldcastle came in the Commentarii (fos. 90v-107v). Apart from praise of Oldcastle, this material consisted of the process against Oldcastle which was described in a letter from Archbishop Arundel to the bishop of London, which was contained in the Fasciculi Zizaniorum (Bodley Library MS Musaeo e 86, fos. 101v-105v). In the Rerum (pp. 100-106), Foxe reprinted this material, adding material from Fabyan's chronicle on Oldcastle's confrontations with the clergy before his revolt. (See Robert Fabyan, The Chronicle of Fabian [London, 1559], STC 10664, p. 390). It is interesting that Foxe apparently did not have access to John Bale's Brief Chronicle, a hagiography of Oldcastle, during his exile. He remedied this in his first edition. There he replaced the account of Oldcastle in his Latin martyrologies with a reprinting of all of Bale's Brief Chronicle, except for the preface and the conclusion. (See John Bale, A brefe chronycle concernyng the examination and death of the blessed martir of Christ sir Johan Oldcastel [London, 1548?], STC 1278, B3r-G2v). Foxe also added a brief account of Arundel's death, which was taken from John Bale's Catalogus (p. 577). In 1570, Foxe reprinted this material but with a few changes. He dropped the beginning of Bale's Brief Chronicle and replaced it with an account of the 1413 Convocation drawn from College of Arms MS Arundel 7, a version of Thomas Walsingham's Chronica majora. (See Thomas Walsingham, Historia Anglicana, ed. H. T. Riley, 2 vols., Rolls Series 28 [London, 1863-4], II, p. 291). Foxe also deleted some of the more sharply anticlerical passages in the Brief Chronicle. The 1570 version of the account of Oldcastle was repeated without change.in the 1576 and 1583 editions.

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Thomas S. Freeman
University of Sheffield

the chiefe and principall cause of the assembling thereof (as recordeth the Chronicle of S. Albones) was to represse the growing and spreading of the Gospell, and especially to withstand the noble & worthy Lorde Cobham: Who was then noted to be a principall fauourer, receiuer, and maintainer of them, whome the Byshop misnamed to be Lollards, especially in the diocesses of London, Rochester, and Hereforde: setting them vp to preache whome the byshops had not licensed, and sending thē about to preach, which was against the constitution prouinciall, before remembred, pag. 524. MarginaliaVid. pag. 508. holding also and teaching opinions of the sacraments, of images, of pilgrimage, of the keyes and church of Rome, contrary and repugnant, to the receiued determination of the Romish church. &c.

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In þe meane time, as these were in talke amōgst them,

concer-
CC.iij.
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