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714 [658]

Actes and Monumentes Of the Churche.

vpon his highnes sent ouer maister Doctoure Champion Doctoure of deuinity and maister hore 

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I.e., the martyr Thomas Garrett. This, however, was not a commission; Champion and Garrett were sent to preach in Calais and, in fact, Garrett was appointed to the living of St. Peter's just outside the town.

two godly and lerned men to preach and instruct the people and to confute all pernicius errors. Who in effect preached and maintened the same true doctrine which Adam Damlip had before set fourth. And by reason there of they lefte þe toune at there departure very quiet, and greatly purged of the slaunder that had ron on it. After the departure of the sayde maister champion and mayster hore, one sir William Smith of our Lady parish in Callis a mā very zealous, though but meanly lerned did begin to preach and ernestly to inveigh against papistry and willfull ignorance: Exhorting mē obediently to receue the word, and no longer to contemne the same, least goddes heuye plages and wrath should fall vpon them which all wayes foloweth the contempt of his holy worde.

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Which sir Smith for that sometime he wold be very feruent and zealous sharpely inueing against the dispisers of the word, was moued by some of the councell there who would seme to fauor gods word, þt he shuld not be so earnest against them þt yet could not awaye with the same, willinge him to beare with such, for by bearinge with them they might happe to be wonne. Well well said the same sir Smith (openly in the pulpet one day as he preched) some men say I am to ernest and will me to bere wt such as cōtinew open enemies against Christs holy gospel, and refuse, nay forbid that one do reade the bible or holy scripture within theire house, but let all such take hede, for before God I feare that God for theire contemning of his word will not longe beare with thē, but make them in such case as some of them shal not haue a hed left them vpon theire shoulders to bere vp their cap with al. and in dede 

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This account of Sir Nicholas Carew's repentance at his death was dropped from the second edition; almost certainly because Foxe learned that it was demonstrably untrue. Carew apparently died a staunch Catholic. Foxe took this account, word-for-word, from Edward Hall, The union of the two noble and illustre famelies of Lancastre and Yorke, (London, 1550), STC 12734a, fo.233r.

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shortly after so it came to passe, for Sir Nicolas Careu knight of the noble order of þe garter & maister of the kinges horse being lieuetenant of Rise banke be fore attainted of treson, was the. iii. of march An. xxxi. Henry. viii. behedded at the Towre hill, who made a godly and humble confession of his supersticious faith and longe contempt of his holy word, geuing God right harty thankes that euer he came into the prison of the towr where he first felt the swetnes of gods great mercy towardes him and the certenty of his saluation through faith in christe promised in his holy worde, the knowledge whereof he had atteined vnto by the readinge of Gods holye word, the english bible, which all his life before he disdained to loke vpon. For whose godly end many men mvch reioised and gaue god harty thankes for the same. This Sir Smith continued in the diligent bestowing of his talent there, till shortly after þe deuell got such holde in the harts of a nomberof goddes enemies, that he with diuers other godlimen were called ouer into England and charged to be naughty fellowes of eronious opinions and worthy of great punishment as hereafter more at large shall apere.

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And for somuch as we haue entred into the story of Callis and matters which were done in that toune it commith to remembrance of one Thomas Broke an alderman of that toun and burges of the parliamēt before mētioned wherin was concluded the next yere after this in An. 1540. the act of. vi. articles as is before saide.

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After this bill of the. vi. articles had passed þe higher house, and was brought to the burgeses of the lower house, the lord Cromwel gaue intelligence not only that it was þe kings maiesties determinate pleasure to haue the bil to passe in sort as it hadde come doune from the Lordes: But also if that any man should stand against it ernestly the same shuld put him selfe in great daunger of his life. 

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Although Cromwell may not have approved of the Six Articles, he had been entrusted by Henry VIIII with their passage through Commons and he was determined to ensure their passage. The fact that Cromwell was acting in support of the Six Articles, in this instance, may be one reason why Foxe had these passages deleted from the second edition of the A&M.

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Notwithstandinge this Thomas Brooke with great danger and peril of his life did repugne and refute the same bill: With diuerse reasons and good grounde of scripture. In so muche that message came downe by Sir N. Pollarde from the Lorde Cromewell to the said Brok willing him as he louid his life not to speake againste the saide bill. Notwithstandinge Broke procedingo in his enterprise, the Lord Cromewell metinge him the next time after that, called him vnto him and saide that he neuer knew man play so desperat a part as to speake against that bill vnlesse hee made a reconinge to be eyther hanged or burned, but god said he hath mightely preserued the wher of I am glad.

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This fear caused men much against their cōsciences (such is mans frailty) to stablishe that acte, but yet not in suche sorte as the bill came downe from the Lordes, for where before, by that fyrst bil sent down, it onlye was felonye for a priest to haue or take vnto him a wife of his owne (though S. Paule say that marriage is honorable among all men, and willeth that euery man for thauoiding of fornicatyō shuld haue his owne wife, and rendring as it were a cause therof affirmeth that it is better to marry then to burn) but no punisnment at al was appoynted for such shamelesse whoremongers incontinent priestes, as contemning holy matrimony, abused their bodies both with womē married, and vnmarried, now vpon the sayde brokes vrging that vnlesse men hadd better opinion of whoredome then of holye matrimonye, called of S. Paule a bed vndefyled, it was of necessity to be graunted þt at the least the incontinent life of priestes vnmaried, should by that acte haue like paine and punishmente, as such priestes which hauing not the gift of con

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