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Thematic Divisions in Book 5
1. Preface to Rubric 2. The Rubric 3. Mary's First Moves 4. The Inhibition5. Bourne's Sermon 6. The True Report7. The Precept to Bonner 8. Anno 15549. From 'The Communication' to 'A Monition' 10. Bonner's Monition11. Mary's Articles for Bonner 12. The Articles 13. From Mary's Proclamation to the 'Stile'14. From the 'Stile' to the 'Communication' 15. The 'Communication' 16. How Thomas Cranmer ... 17. Cranmer18. Ridley 19. Latimer20. Harpsfield's Forme 21. 1563's Disputational Digest22. Political Events up to Suffolk's Death 23. Between Mantell and the Preacher's Declaration 24. The Declaration of Bradford et al 25. May 19 to August 1 26. August 1 - September 3 27. From Bonner's Mandate to Pole's Oration 28. Winchester's Sermon to Bonner's Visitation 29. Pole's Oration 30. From the Supplication to Gardiner's Sermon 31. From Gardiner's Sermon to 1555 32. From the Arrest of Rose to Hooper's Letter 33. Hooper's Answer and Letter 34. To the End of Book X 35. The Martyrdom of Rogers 36. The Martyrdom of Saunders 37. Saunders' Letters 38. Hooper's Martyrdom 39. Hooper's Letters 40. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 41. Becket's Image and other events 42. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 43. Bonner and Reconciliation 44. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 45. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 46. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White47. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 48. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 49. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 50. Judge Hales 51. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 52. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 53. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 54. The Letters of George Marsh 55. The Martyrdom of William Flower 56. Mary's False Pregnancy57. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 58. John Tooly 59. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]60. Censorship Proclamation 61. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 62. Letters of Haukes 63. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 64. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain65. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 66. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 67. Bradford's Letters 68. William Minge 69. The Martyrdom of John Bland 70. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 71. Sheterden's Letters 72. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 73. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 74. John Aleworth 75. Martyrdom of James Abbes 76. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 77. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 78. Richard Hooke 79. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 80. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 81. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 82. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 83. Martyrdom of William Haile 84. Examination of John Newman 85. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 86. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 87. William Andrew 88. William Allen 89. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 90. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 91. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 92. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 93. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 94. John and William Glover 95. Cornelius Bungey 96. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 97. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 98. Ridley and Latimer's Conference 99. Ridley's Letters 100. Life of Hugh Latimer 101. Latimer's Letters 102. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed103. More Letters of Ridley 104. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 105. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 106. William Wiseman 107. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 108. John Went 109. Isobel Foster 110. Joan Lashford 111. Five Canterbury Martyrs 112. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 113. Letters of Cranmer 114. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 115. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 116. William Tyms, et al 117. The Norfolk Supplication 118. Letters of Tyms 119. John Hullier's Execution120. John Hullier 121. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 122. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 123. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 124. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 125. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 126. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 127. Thomas Rede128. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 129. William Slech 130. Avington Read, et al 131. Wood and Miles 132. Adherall and Clement 133. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 134. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow135. Persecution in Lichfield 136. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 137. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 138. John Careless 139. Letters of John Careless 140. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 141. Guernsey Martyrdoms 142. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 143. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 144. Three Men of Bristol145. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 146. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 147. John Horne and a woman 148. Northampton Shoemaker 149. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 150. More Persecution at Lichfield 151. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife152. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent153. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury154. The 'Bloody Commission'155. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester156. Five Burnt at Smithfield157. Stephen Gratwick and others158. Edmund Allen and other martyrs159. Edmund Allen160. Alice Benden and other martyrs161. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs162. Ambrose163. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper164. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs165. John Thurston166. Thomas More167. George Eagles168. Richard Crashfield169. Fryer and George Eagles' sister170. John Kurde171. Cicelye Ormes172. Joyce Lewes173. Rafe Allerton and others174. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston175. Persecution at Lichfield176. Persecution at Chichester177. Thomas Spurdance178. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson179. John Rough and Margaret Mearing180. Cuthbert Simson181. William Nicholl182. Seaman, Carman and Hudson183. Three at Colchester184. A Royal Proclamation185. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs186. Richard Yeoman187. John Alcocke188. Alcocke's Epistles189. Thomas Benbridge190. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs191. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver192. Three at Bury193. The Final Five Martyrs194. William Living195. The King's Brief196. William Browne197. Some Persecuted at Suffolk198. Elizabeth Lawson199. Edward Grew200. The Persecuted of Norfolk201. The Persecuted of Essex202. Thomas Bryce203. The Persecuted in Kent204. The Persecuted in Coventry and the Exiles205. Thomas Parkinson206. The Scourged: Introduction207. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax208. Thomas Greene209. Bartlett Greene and Cotton210. Steven Cotton's Letter211. Scourging of John Milles212. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw213. Robert Williams214. Bonner's Beating of Boys215. A Beggar of Salisbury216. John Fetty217. James Harris218. Providences: Introduction219. The Miraculously Preserved220. Christenmas and Wattes221. Simon Grinaeus222. John Glover223. Dabney224. Alexander Wimshurst225. Bosom's wife226. The Delivery of Moyse227. Lady Knevet228. Crosman's wife229. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk230. Congregation of London231. Robert Cole232. Englishmen at Calais233. John Hunt and Richard White234. Punishments of Persecutors235. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth236. The Westminster Conference237. Nicholas Burton238. Another Martyrdom in Spain239. Baker and Burgate240. Burges and Hoker241. Justice Nine-Holes242. Back to the Appendix notes243. A Poor Woman of Exeter244. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material245. Priest's Wife of Exeter246. Gertrude Crockhey
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1355 [1286]

Actes and Monumentes of the church.

dement of hauing a communion: the sacrament is not communicated to all, vnder bothe kindes, accordynge to the woorde of the Lorde. The sign is seruilely worshipped, for the thing signified. Christes Passion is iniuryed, for asmuch as this masse sacrifice is affirmed to remaine for the purging of synnes: to be shorte, the manyfold superstitions & triflinge fondnes which are in the Masse, & about the same.

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MarginaliaH. LatimerBetter a few thinges well pondered, then to trouble the memory with to much. you shal preuayle more with prayeng, then with studieng, though mixture be best. For so one shal alleuiate the tediousnes of the other. I entend not to contend much with them in wordes, after a reasonable accoumpte of my fayth geuen: for it shal be but in vayne. They wyll saye, as their fathers sayd, when they haue no more to say. MarginaliaIoan. 19.We haue a lawe, and by our lawe he ought to dye. Be ye stedfast and vnmoueable sayth sainte Paule, and agayne, persistito, stand faste. Marginalia1. Corin. 15. Marginalia1. Timo. 3. Ioan. 15. Col. 1.And how ofte is this repeted, if ye abyde, if ye abide &c. But wee shall be called obstinate, sturdy, ignoraūt, heady and what not? So that a man hath nede of much patience, hauing to do with such men. 

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Latimer is advising Ridley not to rely too much on argument during his examinations because their adversaries will quibble and insult them. This remark is interesting in light of the behaviour of Latimer during the disputations at Oxford in April 1554 and during his trial.

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MarginaliaAntō obiec. 3But you know how greate a crime it is to separate your selfe from the communion or felowship of the church, and to make a schisme, or diuision. you haue bene reported to haue hated the secte of the Anabaptistes, and alwayes to haue impugned the same. More ouer this was the perniciouse erroure of Nouatus, 

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I.e., Novatian a third century heresiarch. The Novationists separated from the church because they refused to recognize bishops and clergy who had compromised with the pagan authorities during the Decian persecution.

and of the Heretikes called (Cathari)  
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The Cathari, or Cathers, were a religious sect which flourished from the late eleventh into the fourteenth centuries in western Germany, northern Italy and southern France.

that they would not comunicat with the church.

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MarginaliaN. Rydleys Answer.I know that the vnity of the church is to be retayned by all meanes, and the same to be necessary to saluatiō. But I do not take the masse as it is at this daye, for the communion of the church, but for a popish deuise wherby both the commaundement and institution of our sauour Christ for the ofte frequentinge of the remembraunce of his death, is eluded, and the people of God are miserably deluded. The sect of the Anabaptistes, and the heresy of the Nouatians, ought of right to be condemned, for as much as without any iuste or necessary cause they wyckedly separated them selfes from the communion of the congregation: for they dyd not alleadge that the sacramentes were vnduely ministred, but turning a waye theire eies frō them selfes, where with accordinge to saynte Paules rule Marginalia1. Corin. 11. they ought to examine them selues and casting theyr eyes euer vpon others, either ministers or communicantes with them, they alwaies reproued som thing for the which they absteined from the communion, as from an vnholy thing.

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MarginaliaH. Latimer.I remember that Caluine beginneth to confute the Interim 

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The Augsburg Interim (1548) was a doctrinal formula creating a religious settlement between catholics and protestants in the Holy Roman Empire. It was rejected by Calvinists and Swiss and English protestants, who particularly objected to its eucharistic theology. (It was also denounced by the pope).

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after this sorte with this saing of Hilarie. MarginaliaHilarius contra Auxent. The name of peace is beautifull and the opinion of vnitie is fayre: but who doubteth that to be the true and onely peace of the church, which is christes? I would you had that litle booke: there should you see how much is to be geuen to vnity. Saint Paule when he requireth vnity, he ioyneth strayght with all, MarginaliaRom. 15.secundum Iesum Christum, according to Iesus Christ, no further. Diotrephes now of late did euer harpe vpon vnity, vnity. Yea Syr (quod I) but in veritie not in popery. Better is a diuersity, thē an vnity in popery. I had nothing

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agayne but scornefull gieres, with commaundement to the Tower.

MarginaliaAnton. obiect. 4.But admitte there be in the masse that peraduenture might be amēded, or at least made better: yea, seing you wil haue it so, admit there be a fault: if you do not consent therto, Why doo you trouble your self in vain? do not you know both by Ciprian and Augustine MarginaliaCypri. l. 1. ep. 2. A.uep. 152 that communion of sacramentes doth not defile a man, but consent of dedes.  

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Augustine is being taken a bit out of context here; he was saying that even the misdeeds of an unworthy priest did not defile the sacrament.

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MarginaliaN. Ryd. Answer.Yf it were any one trifling ceremonie, or if it were some one thinge of it selfe indifferente (although I would wishe nothinge should be done in the church, which dooth not edifye the same) yet for the continuance of the cōmen quietnes I could be contente to beare it. But for asmuch as thinges done in the masse tend openly to the ouerthrow of Christes institution, I iudge that by no means either in word, or dede I ought to consent vnto it. As for that which is obiected out of the Fathers, I acknowledge it to be well spoken, if it be well vnderstanded. But it is ment of them which suppose they are defiled, if any secret vice be either in the ministers, or in them that communicate with them, and is not ment of them which do abhorre superstition, and wicked traditions of men, and wyll not suffer the same to be thrust vpon them selfes, or vpon the church, in steade of Goddes worde, and the trueth of the gospell.

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MarginaliaH. Latimer.The very mary bones 

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I.e., the essence.

of the masse are al togither detestable, and therfore by no meanes to be borne withal, so that of necessity the mēding of it, is to abolish it for euer. For if you take away oblation, and adoration, which do hange vpon consecration and transubstantiacion, the most papistes of them al wil not set a button by the masse, as a thing which they esteme not, but for the gaine that foloweth theron. For if the Englysh communion, which of late was vsed, were as gainefull to them, as the masse hath ben heretofore, they would striue no more for theyr masse: from thēce groweth the griefe.

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MarginaliaAnton. obiect. 5.Consider into what daungers you cast your selfe, if you forsake the church: and you cannot but forsake it, if you refuse to goo to masse. For the masse is the sacrament of vnity: without the Arke there is no saluation. The Church is the Arke and Peters shippe. Ye knowe this saing wel inough. He shall not haue God to be hys Father, which acknowlegeth not the church to be his mother. Moreouer without the Church (sayeth Saint Augustine MarginaliaAug. li. 4. de Sim. c. 10. In ep. post col. contra Donat.) be the lyfe neuer so well spent, it shall not enherit the kingdome of heauen.

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MarginaliaN. Ridleis answer.The holy Catholique or vniuersall Church, which is the communion of saintes, the howse of God, the City of God, the spowse of Christ, the body of Christ, the piller, and staye of the truth, Marginaliai. Timo. 3. Apocal. 21. Ephes. 1. this church I beleue accordinge to the Creede. This church I do reuerence, and honour in the Lorde. But the rule of this church is the word of God, according to which rule, we go forward vnto life. And as many as walk accordinge to this rule, I say with saint Paul MarginaliaGala. 6. Phil. 2. peace be vpon them, and vpon Israell which pertaineth vnto God. The guide of this church isthe holy ghost. The markes, wherby thys Church is knowen vnto me in thys darcke world, and in the myddeste of thys crooked and frowarde generation, are these. The sincere preachinge of Goddes holy woorde,

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the due
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