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next vnto hym, they sayd, what he hath done afore, we knowe not, but nowe we see & heare that he doth speake and praye very deuoutlye and godly. Other some wyshed that he had a cōfessor, there was a certaine priest by, sytting a horseback in a greane gowne drawen aboute with read sylke, whiche sayd, he ought not to be heard, because he is an heretike. Yet not withstanding whyles he was in pryson, he was not only most godly & louingly heard, but also absolued by a certaine doctor a monke, as Hus him selfe dothe witnes in a certaine epi-pistle whiche he wrote vnto his frendes out of pryson. For Christ raigneth vnknowen vnto the world euen in the middest of his enemies. In the meane tyme whyles he prayed as he bowed his neck backward to loke vpwarde vnto heauen, the crowne of paper fell of from hys head vpon the grounde, then one of the souldyours takyng it vp agayne sayde, let vs put it agayne vpon his head that he may be burned with his maisters the deuyls whome he hath serued.

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When as by the commaundement of the tormentours, he was rysen vp from the place of his prayer, with a loude voyce he sayde Lorde Iesu Christ assiste and helpe me, that with a constante and pacient mynd by thy moste gratious help I may beare and suffer this cruell and ignominious death, wherunto I am condemned, for the preaching of thy moste holye Gospell and worde. Then as before he declared the cause of his death vnto the people, in the meane season, the hangman stryped hym of his garmentes, and tourning his handes behynde his backe, tied him faste vnto the stake wt ropes that were made wet, and wher as by chaunce he was tourned towardes the East, certayne cryed out that he should not loke towardes the Easte, for he was an heretyke: so he was tourned towardes the Weste. Then was his necke tyed with a chayne vnto the stake, the whiche chayne when he behelde, smyling he sayde, that he woulde wyllynglye receiue the same chayne, for Iesu Christes sake whome he knewe was bounde with a far worse chayne. Vnder his feete they set twoo faggottes, stoppyng strawe betwene them, & so likewyse from the feete vp to the chynne, he was inclosed in round about with wood.

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But before the wood was set on fyer, the Emperours maister of the horse be of Oppenheim and an other Gentlemā with hym, came and exhortyd Iohn Hus, that he should yet be myndefull of his sauefegard and renounce his errours, to whome he sayde, what errour shold I renounce when as I knowe my selfe gyltie of none: for those thynges whiche are fasly alleged agaynst me, I knowe that I neuer did somuche as once thynke them, muche lesse preache them. For this was the pryncipal end MarginaliaThe last cōfession of Iohn Husand pryck of my doctrine, that I myght teache all men penaunce and remission of synnes according to the veritie of the Gospell of Iesus Christ, & the exposition of the holy doctours. Wherfore with a chierfull mynde & courage I am here ready to suffer death. When he had spoken these wordes, they lefte hym and shaking handes together they departed.

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Then was the fyer kyndled, and Iohn Hus began to singe with a loude voyce, Iesu Christ the sonne of the liuing God haue mercy vpon me, & when he began to say the same the third time the wynde droue þe flame so vpō his face, that it choked hym. Yet notwithstandinge he moued a whyle after, by the space that a man myght almoste saye three tymes the Lordes prayer. When all the wood was burned and consumed the vpper part of the body was left hanging in the chayne, the whiche they threw downe stake and all, and makyng a newe fyer burned it, the head being first cut in smal gobbettes that it myght the soner be consumed vnto ashes. The harte whiche was found amongest the bowels being wel beaten with staues and cloubbes, was at laste prycked vpon a sharpe stycke and rosted at a fyer a parte vntil it was consumed. Then with great diligence gathering the ashes together, caste them into the Ryuer of Rheyne, that there should not so lytle a duste of the ashes of that man be lefte vpon the earth, whose memory notwithstāding cannot be abholyshed out of the myndes of the godly, neyther by fyer, neither by water, neyther by any kynde of torment.

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I knowe very well that these thinges are very sclenderly written of me as touching the labours of this moste holy Martyr Iohn Hus, with whome the labours of Hercules are not to be compared, for that auncient Hercules slue a fewe monstars, but this our Hercules with a moste stoute and valiaūt courage hath subdued euen the worlde it self, the mother of all mōsters and cruel beastes. This story were worthy some other kind of more eligant phrase or speche, but forsomuch as I can not otherwise perfourme it my selfe, I haue indeuored according to the very truth as the thing was in deede to commend the same vnto the godlye myndes, neither haue I heard it reported by others, but I my selfe was present at the doing of all these thinges, and as I was able I haue put them in wrytyng, that by this my labour and indeuour howsoeuer it were, I might preserue the memory of this moste holy man and excellent doctor of the Euangelicall truthe.

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Thende of the history of Iohn Hus.

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