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447 [447]

sayde deponent immediatly gaue knowledge to the Chaunceller, whereupon the Chaunceller went vp with the maister of the Rolles, & maister Subdeane with other doctoures vnknowen, to the nomber of a dosen and their seruauntes.

¶ The deposition of Iohn Enderby Barber.

The sayde Iohn Enderby saieth, the Frydaye before the death of Richard Hun, betwixt eight and nyne of the clocke in the morninge, he met with Iohn Belrynger in Estchepe, and asked of him how master Hun fared, the sayde Belrynger aunswered, saying: There is ordeined for hym so greuous penaunce þt when mē here of it, they shall haue great maruel thereof: witnesses that hearde Iohn Belringer saye these wordes, Iohn Rutter Screuener, and William Segar Armurer.

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Also the saide Iohn Enderby saith, the same Monday that Richard Hun was founde dead, he met with the saide Iohn Belringer at the conduite in gracious streate about nyne of the clocke in the morning, asking the sayd Belringer, how Maister Hun fared, the sayde Belringer aunswered, saying: he fared well this daye in the morninge betwixte fiue and sixe of the clocke. Howbeit, I am sory for him, for there can no body, come to him vntill I come, for I haue the keyes of the doores here by my gyrdell, & shewed the keyes to the sayd Enderby.

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¶ The deposition of Alen Creswell VVaxe Chaundeler.

The saide Alen saith, that Iohn Grandger seruaunt with my Lord of London, in my lord of Londons kechin, at suche tyme as the sayde Alen was sering of Huns coffen, that Grandger told to him that he was present with Iohn Belringer the same Sondaye at night that Richard Hun was founde dead, in the morowe whan his kepers set him in the stockes, in so muche the saide Hun desyred to borowe the kepers knyfe, and the keper asked him what he would doo with his knyfe, and he aunswered, I hadde leuer kyll my selfe than to bee thus entreated. This deposition the sayde Alen will proue as farre forth as any Christen man may, saying, that Grandger shewed to hym these wordes of his owne free will and mynd, without any question or enquirie to him made by the said Alen. Moreouer the said Alē saith, that all that euening Grandger was in great feare.

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☞ The deposion of Richarde Horsnaile bailife of the sanctuary Toune called Goddesture in Essex.

The said Richard saieth, the Friday before Christmas day last past that one Charles Ioseph, somner to my Lord of London, became a sanctuary man, and the aforesaide Frydaye, he regestred his name, the sayde Charles saiyng it was for the sauegarde of his body, for therebe certaine men in London so extreme aginste him for the death of Richard Hun, that he dare not abyde in London: Howbeit the said Charles saieth, he knowledgeth him selfe giltles of Huns death, for he deliuered the keyes to the Chaunceler by Huns life, also the sayde Bailife saieth, that Charles paide the deutie of the saide regestring, both to hym and Syr Iohn Studely Vicar.

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☞ The copy of my Lorde of Londons letter sent to my lorde Cardinall.

I Beseche your good Lordship to stand so good lord vnto my poore chanceler now in warde, and endited by an vntrue quest for the death of Richard Hun, vpō the only accusation of Charles Ioseph, made by payne & duraunce, that by your intercession it maye please the kynges grace to haue the matter duely and sufficiently examined by indifferent persones of his discrete councel in the presence of the parties, or there be any more done in þe cause, and that vpon the innocencie of my said Chaunceller declared, it may further please the kynges grace to awarde a plackarde vnto his atturnay, to confesse the sayde enditement to be vntrue whan the tyme shall require it, for assured am I if my Chaunceller be tried by any twelue men in London, they be so maliciously set. In fauorem heretice prauitatis, that they wyll cast and cōdemne any clerke though he were an innocent as Abell. Quare si potes beate pater adiuua infirmitates nostras et tibi imperpetuum deuincti erimus. Ouer this in most humble wyse I beseche you that I maye haue the kynges gracious fauour whome I neuer offended wyllingly, and that by your good meanes I myght speake with his grace & you, and I with all myne, shall praye for your prosperous estate long to continue.

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Your most humble Orator. R. L.

¶ The wordes that my Lord of London spake before the Lordes in the parlament Chamber.

MEmorandum, that the bishope of Londō said in the parliament chamber, that ther was a bill brought to the parliament to make the iury that was charged vpon the death of Hun trew men, and said and tooke vpon his conscience that they wer false periured caytifs and saide further more to all the Lordes there than being: For the loue of GOD, looke vp this matter, for if you doo not I dare not kepe mine owne house for heretiks: And saied that the said Richard Hun hanged him selfe, and þt it was his owne dede & no mans els. And furthermore said, that their came a man to his howse (whose wife was appeached of heresie) to speak with him, and he said that he had no minde to speak with the same man, which man spake and reported to the seruants of the same Bishop, that if his wife would not hold stil her

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