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451 [451]

a great deuine, and also Maister Iohn Keisersberge, being both learned, and famous men, but namely Maister Eugeline thought, that to much malice and rashnes was shewed in handling of that same man. And did not feare to sai, that many of his articles and the greter parte therof might be holden well inoughe, and greatly blaming the mad and phantasticall discention of the Thomists, seking by all maner of wayes how to get the triumph ouer the seculer diuines, &c.

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Moreouer Iacobus Wimpfelingus witnesseth that the same Ioannes Wesellianus, wt his teaching & writing did illustrat the schole of Erforde, not a litle, it weare to be wished that the bookes that this man lefte written were extant abroad. And thus much of doctor Veselianus, who was condēned at Mētz. 1479

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Doctour Veselus.

ABout the same time was also Doctour Veselus otherwise called basilius, saue that this Veselus was somthing yonger then Vesellianus, but yet both about one time, and great frendes to gether. This Veselus died the yeare of our Lord. 1490. After that Vesellianus was condempned, this Veselus thought that the Inquisitor would come also and examine him, as he himself in a certain Epistle doth write. He was so notable & so worthy a man þt of the people he was called lux mundi. That is: the light of the world.

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Conserning his doctrine, first he reprehended the opinion of the papists, as touching repentance, which they deuided in thre partes, satisfaction and confession he did disalowe, like wise purgatory and supererogatiō of workes and pardones he did disproue, both at Rome and at Parris, he spake a gainst the Popes indulgences, by the occasiō wherof diuers of the Pops Court, perswaded by him, begā to speke more frely against the same matter, then he himselfe had done. The abuses of masses and prainge for the deade, he dissalowed and likewise the supremacie of the Pope, he vtterly reiected (as apereth in a booke of his de sacramēto penitentiæ) denieng vterly þt any supreame head, or gouernour ought to be in the worlde ouer al other: affirming also and saying many tymes, that the Pope had no auctoritie to doo any thing by commaundement but by truthe, that is so farre as truth goeth with him: so far his sentence to stand: neither that he ought to preuaile by cōmaunding, but only by teaching so, as euery true Christian byshop maye preuayle ouer an other. Also in some place in hys wrytinges he denieth not, but that Popes and their spirituall prelates, proceading againste Christes doctrine, be plaine Antichristes, suche as were infirme & not able to performe þe bond of chastitie taken vpō them, he said they mightwell breake their vowe.

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Also the sayde Weselus witnesseth that the forfathers whiche were before Albert & Thomas, did resiste and withstande the Popes indulgences, calling thē in their wrytings plain idolatry, mere fraude and errour. Adding moreouer that vnlesse the seueritie of some good deuines, had not withstanded these pardons and indulgences of the Pope: innumerable errours had ouerflowen the churche.

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Amonges the workes of Weselus, there is a certaine epistle of another mā written to him, in whiche the autour of the epistle confesseth, MarginaliaEx Epist iusdam in opere Veseli.þt in his time there was a certaine learned mā at Paris, called maister Thomas de Curselis a deane: who being in the councell of Basell, where as diuers began to aduaunce the power of the Pope to farre, declared and affirmed, to be said to him of Christ : MarginaliaDictū Chri. Not euerie thing is bōd in heauen þt a man sayth he byndeth in earth. but what he bindeth in very deede. Quicquid ligaueris super terram erit ligatum & in cælo etc. Et non. Quicquid dixeris esse ligatum. That is: what soeuer thou shalt binde vpon earth, shalbe bōd in heauen, that to be true. But not, what so euer thou saiest to be bound. As who shuld say the Pope can not nor doth not bynde therfore, because he so saieth, except truthe & rightuousnes go also wt him, thē he do so bynd in deede. There is a certaine boke of this man amongst diuers others, whiche he entituleth. De subditis et superioribus. In the whiche he disputeth greatly against the Pope & his prelates. Affirming that the Pope vnles his faithe and doctrine be sound, ought not to be obeide. He affirmeth also that the Pope may erre, and whē he erreth, men ought by all maner of meanes to resist him. Item that great and superfluous riches in the clergie do not profite, but hurt the churche. That the Pope dothe wickedly distribute the rentes of the churche, and the churche it selfe to vnworthy ministers by Symony for his own profit and gaine. Wherby it may appeare that he neither careth for God, nor the health of the church. Item that the preceptes & commaundementes of the Pope and prelates, be no otherwyse, but as the councels and preceptes of phisitions, bindyng no further then they are found to be holsome & standing with the truth of the word. Itē that the Pope can cōmand no man vnder pain of deadly sin, except God cōmaund him before: he saieth þe keies of the Pope & of the prelates be not such wher with they open the kingdome of heauē, but rather shut it, as the Pharisies did. Concerninge vowes, he disputeth, that such as be folysh & impossible, ought to be broken. That the hearers ought to discerne and iudge of the doctrine of their prelates, and not to receiue euery thyng, that they say without due examination.

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He sheweth moreouer that the sentēce or excommunication is of more force, proceading from a trewe Godly honest, symple, & learned

man,
Oo.ii.
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