Navigate the 1563 Edition
PrefaceBook 1Book 2Book 3Book 4Book 5
Critical Apparatus for this Page
Commentary on the Text
Names and Places on this Page
Unavailable for this Edition
455 [455]

exercise both of his disputations in the scholes and preching in churches, wheras many wise and learned men attentiuelye heard Luther, namely the doctor Mellerstad. The said Mellerstad wold oftentimes say, Luther was of such a meruailous spirit, and so ingenious, that he gaue apparent signification, how that he wold introduce a more compendious, facile and familier manner of teaching, and alter and abolish thorder that then was vsed.

[Back to Top]

There fyrst he expounded the Logicke and Phisicke of Aristotle, and in the meane while intermitted no whit his study in Theologye. Three yeres after he went to Rome, about certain contentiōs of the monkes, and returning the same yere, he was graded doctor, at the expences of MarginaliaFriderike Duke of Saxony.elector Fredericke, duke of Saxony, according to the solempne manner of scholes. For he had heard him preach, wel vnderstāded the quicknes of his spirit, diligētly considered the vehemency of his words, and had in singular admiration those profoūd matters, which in his sermons he luculently & exactly exposed. MarginaliaLuther cōmensed doctor.And that all men may perceiue the degree of doctoure was geuen him by precipitation of iudgement: it is well knowen he was then but xxx. yere old. He declared that Staupicius against his will enforced him to take that degre, saying merelye vnto him: that god hadde many thinges to bringe to perfection in hys church by him. And though these words were spoken merely: yet it came so to passe anon after, as manye predictions or presages proue true before a chaunge.

[Back to Top]

After this he began to expound the Epistle to the Romains, & consequently the psalmes. But how? he declared them so deuineli, that it semed in the iudgement of al faithful and learned mē, he was a shining light, or bright Phebus, that began to cleare after a longe cloudy and obscure sky. Ther he shewed the differēce betwixt the law and the Gospell. He also confounded therror that raigned then in scholes & sermons, teaching, that men merite remission of sinnes by their proper works, and that they be iust before God, by outward discipline, as þe Phariseis taught. Luther diligently reduced the mindes of men, to the sonne of God. And as Ihon Baptist demonstrated the Lambe of God that toke away the synnes of the world: MarginaliaLuther taught Iesus Christ.euē so Luther expresly shewed that sinnes are frely remitted, for the loue of the sonne of God and that we ought faithfully to embrace this boūtifull gift. He also illustrated diuers other poyntes of Ecclesiastical doctrine.

[Back to Top]

These happye 

Commentary  *  Close

In the 1570 edition Foxe amended these passages to remove the dangerous admissions (at least to sixteenth-century readers) that Luther was an innovator and that many of his mentors and colleagues deplored the schism that he created in the Church.

beginninges of so good matters, got him great authority, considering his life was correspondente to his profession: & it plainly appeared that his words were no lyp labor, but proceaded from the very hart. This admiration of his holy life muche allured theharts of his auditors, & therfore many notable personages, familierly knowing him, & seing him innouate the vsuall ceremonies, resysted him nothing, but in respect of the autority, he procured before (as wel for that he reueled many good matters, as that his life was holy (cōsented with him in his opinions, wt the which they saw the world deuided diuersly: and therfore were pensiue and very sore greued.

[Back to Top]

At this time Luther altered nothinge in the ceremonies, but precisely obserued his rule among his fellowes, he medled in no doubtfull opinions, but taught this only doctrin, as most principal of al other, to all mē elucidating the same more and more, that is to say, the doctrin of repentance, of remission of sinnes, of fayth, of true comfort in times of aduersitye. Euery man receiued good tast of this swete doctrine, and the learned conceiued high pleasure to behold Iesus Christ. The Prophets & Apostles come forth into light, out of darknes. wherby vnderstand the differēce betwixt the law and the gospell, betwixt the promises of the law, & the promise fo the gospel, betwixt spiritual iustice, and ciuill thinges, which certenly coulde not haue bene found in Thomas Aquin, Scotus, nor his semblables.

[Back to Top]

He considered this also, that many wer prouoked by Erasmus learned workes, to studye the Greke and latine tonges, which perceiuyng a more gentle and ready order of teaching thē before, began to haue in contempt the monkes barbarous and sophistical doctrine: and speciallye suche as were of a gentle nature and good disposition. Luther began to studye the Greke and Hebrue tong, to this end, that after he had learned the phrase and propriety of the tonges and drawen the doctrine out of the very fountaines, he might geue more sound iudgement.

[Back to Top]

Whilest Luther was in this course of study a certaine Dominicke Frier named Tecell, a most impudent Sicophant (if euer there raigned any) caused the Popes indulgences or pardons to be caried and sold about the countrye. Luther, muche moued with the blasphemous sermons this shameles frier preached, and hauing his hart earnestlye bent with ardent desire to maintaine true religion, MarginaliaLuthers proposycions of pardons.published certaine propositions concerninge indulgences, which are in the fyrst Tome of his worckes, & set them openly on the temple that ioyneth to the castel of Wittēberg, the morrow after the feast of al sainctes, the yere 1517.

[Back to Top]

This beggerly Frier, hoping to obtaine the popes blessing, assembled certain monkes and sophistical deuines of his couēt, and forthwith commaunded them to write somthing against Luther. And whilest he woulde not hym selfe seme to be dombe, be began not only to inuey in his sermons, but to thūder against Luther, crying: Luther is an hereticke, and worthy to

[Back to Top]
be
Oo.iiii.
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield