Navigate the 1563 Edition
PrefaceBook 1Book 2Book 3Book 4Book 5
Critical Apparatus for this Page
Commentary on the Text
Names and Places on this Page
Unavailable for this Edition
558 [52]

Actes and Monumentes of the Church.

I aunswered that it was both christes body and oures also, as saint Paule teacheth vs in the first epistle to the Corinthians and tenth chapter for as one lofe is made of many cornes which doth signify our body, which beinge diuers and many members, are associate and gathered to gether into one felowship or body. Likewise of the wine which is gathered of many clusters and grapes, and is made into one licore, but the same breade againe, in that it is broken, is the body of Christ, declaringe his body, to be broken and deliuered vnto death, for the redemtion of our sinns. Furthermore in þt the sacrament is distributed the body of christ and frute of his passion is thereby signified. The communication whereof doth equally redounde vnto all faithfull christians.

[Back to Top]

Finally when it is deliuered to be eatē and is receiued of them which do eate it, it is the body of Christ admonishinge vs by that signification that our inward man is refreshed by the body and merites of Christ, euen as the bread is receaued to the outward norishinge of our bodies, with our mouth and teth.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaTransubstantiation.Then saide they, dost thou not thinke, that the very body of Christ, with his members to be conteined vnder the sacrament really and simply without all trope or figure? No suerly I do not thinke it, albeit I would not haue it thus to be vnderstāded that this which I now deny, ye should by & by esteme it, as a necessarye article of faith. MarginaliaThe maner of christes being in the sacramēt is no necessary article of oure fayth.for as this youre opinion which you affirme doth not establish no waighty or necessary article of faith, euen so as touching it which we determine vpon the contrary part, we would haue you to iudge, that you should not by and by esteme it as an article of faith, that which we deny.

[Back to Top]

But rather that you would so leaue the matter fre vnto euery mans iudgement, that either part without contempt or hatred of other might vse his own opinion, and norish mutuall loue and charity betwen them in the lorde and one to beare the others infirmyty. After this, they alleaged the place of Saint Austine where he saith, MarginaliaFerebatur manibus propriis.ferebatur in manibus propriis. 

Commentary  *  Close

This is largely a close paraphrasing of page 451 of the Russell edition. Frith's examination of St Paul's Epistle to the Corinthians was inspired (or lifted directly) from Zwingli's Exposition and basis of the conclusions or articles (of 1523). The reference to sacramental eating ('Finally when … mouth and teth'] is taken from Zwingli's Fidei confessio (or Account of the faith) of 1530. After which Frith expresses his adiaphora theory on the sacrament. The quote is altered slightly in the 1583 edition.

[Back to Top]
That is to saye: he was caried in his owne hands, wherevnto I aunswered that Sainte Austine was a plaine interpreter of him selfe for he saieth in a nother place. MarginaliaThe place of Sainte Austen expounded.Ferebatur tanquam in manibus suis, that is to say he was caried as it were in his oune handes which is a phrase of speach, not of one that doth simply affirm, but only of aman expressinge a thinge by a similitude. And albeit that saint Austine had not expounded him selfe, MarginaliaAugustinus ad bonefacium.yet he writinge vnto Boniface doth plainly admonishe all mē þt the sacramentes do represent the similitude of those things, wherof they are sacraments &oftentimes euen of the similitude of thinges them selues they doo take there names, euen so accordinge to this rule it may be saide, hee was caried in his oune handes, when as he caried in his handes the sacrament of his bodye and bloode.

[Back to Top]

Then they brought in the sentence of Chrisostome, which at the first front may seme to fauour there opinion, for he in a certaine homily vpon the supper writeth thus: Do you se þe bread or wine? Be they voided into þe draught as other meates are? God forbid. It is not soo to be thought for as wax which is put into the fire is made like vnto the fire, and no parte of the substāce remayneth, euen so here, the pure misteries of the body to bee consumed in substance &c. Vnto this place of Chrisostom so he lykewyse he also alledged Chrisostom again, as a faithfull interpreter of him selfe, which in a nother place writeth these wordes, the inwarde eies saieth hee, as sone as they see the breade, by and by they passe from the creature & do not thinke of that same breade which is baked by the baker, but vpon him which called him selfe the brede of life, which is signified by that misticall breade &c. These twoo sences if they be conferred to gether, the one will easely expounde the other. For where in the first hee doth aske, whether tho doest se the breade and wine, he doth deny the same in the last, for the inwarde eies saieth he, as sone as they see 

Commentary  *  Close

This is largely a close paraphrasing of page 452 of the Russell edition. Frith refers here to the letter of St Augustine to Boniface (of 408AD). This is letter no.98 of Augustine's collected letters and can be found on-line at http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/1102098.htm, which discusses the relationship between the physical elements of the eucharist and the spiritual elements these represent. Luther held that the physical and spiritual elements partake of each other in such a close fashion that the bread and the body of Christ cannot be distinguished in the elements whereas Zwingli (who Frith follows here) held that the relationship between the physical and spiritual elements was symbolic only, but that the physical elements still had some deep meaning (see the references to sacramental eating made earlier). Frith then went on to discuss the opinions of St John Chrysostom, which the bishops interrogating him took to prove a physical presence. Frith is here referring to Chrysostom's homily 82 (an exposition of Matthew 26:26-9), which can be found on-line at http://www.newadvent. org/fathers/240182.htm. Chrysostom actually discusses the eucharist throughout several homilies (on Matthew and on John 6) and it is understandable why the bishops would take him as a source in favour of a real physical presence doctrine. Chrysostom often made a comparative argument in his homilies (here and elsewhere) between God's power and human senses so, for example, where Jesus says 'this is my body', Chrysostom seemed willing to take Him at his word, even if human senses failed to discern a difference between the bread and the body.

[Back to Top]
the breade, they passe away from the creatures and do not any longer thinke vpon the breade but vpon him which is signified by those misteries, so by that meanes it hapneth that the thinge which he seith the same againe he doth not see, for with the outwarde corporall eies, þe bread is sene, but the inward eies do nether see the breade nor wine but passing ouer those thinges do rather intende to some other ende or purpose, as þe common phrase of our spech doth say: as often as in play we doo lose or let passe any thinge negligently, it is saide that we se not what we do, not that in dede we do not se that which we handle, but by cause our minde infixed a nother way doth not attende vnto that which the eye doth see.

[Back to Top]

In like manner, may it be aunswered vnto that which followeth: Whether it do avoide into the draught as other meates do? I will not say, for other meates passing throughe the bowells, after they haue of them selfes gyuen norishmēt vnto the body they be voided in þe draught, but this is a spiritual meat, which is receiued by faith, and norisheth both body & soule vnto euerlasting life, neither is it at any time auoided as other meates are.

[Back to Top]

And as before I saide, that the externall eies did behold the breade, which the inwarde eies 

Commentary  *  Close

This is largely a close paraphrasing of page 452 of the Russell edition. Frith carries on the discussion of Chrysostom's doctrine.

being o-
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield