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did manifiestly declare, MarginaliaThe great almes of quene Annewhyche besydes the ordinarye of one C. gownes, and other apparell that she gaue weekly a yeare before she was crouned, both to men and wemē, she also gaue wonderfull much priuy almes to þe wydowes and other power housholders, continually till she was apprehended, and she euer gaue thre or foure pound at a time to the poore people too bie them Kine with al, and sent her subamner, to the tounes about where she lay, that þe parishoners should make a bil of all the poore housholders in their parish, and some townes receiued vii. viii. or x. pound to bie kine withal according as the nōber of the pore in þe towns were. She also maintained many learned men in Cambridge. Likewise did the Earl of Wilshire her Father, and the Lord Roch. her brother, & by them they were brought in fauor wt king Henry the viii. as som yet being a liue cā testify þe same, which wolde to God were now as great professors of the Gospell of Christe, as then they appeared to be, MarginaliaHeath. Thyrlby. L. Paget.whyche were doctoure Heath, and doctor Thirleby, but especially þe Lord Paget, who at that present was an earnest protestant, and gaue vnto one Rainold West, Luthers bokes, and other bokes of the Germains, as Franciscus Lambertus Auionensis, de sectis, and at that time he red Melanctons Rhetoricke, openly in Trinity hal in Cambridge, MarginaliaL. Paget maintainer of d. barnesand was with his master Gardner a maintainer of doctor Barnes, and al the protestantes that were then in Cambrydge, and did helpe many religious persones out of their cowles.

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MarginaliaThe praise of quene Anne.It hath bene reported vnto vs by diuers credible persons which were about her, and daili acquainted with her doings, concernynge her liberal and bountiful distribution to the pore, howe her grace caried euer about her a certen litle purse, out of the which, she was wont daily to skatter abrode some almes to the neady, thinking no day wel spent, wherin no manne had fared þe better by some benefit at her hād, and this I wryte by the relation of certen noble personages which were chefe and princypal of her wayting maides about her.

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Also concerning the order of her ladies and gentle wemen aboute her, one that was her silke woman, a gentle woman not now aliue, but of great creadite, and also of fame for her worthy doings, was hard creadibly to report, MarginaliaThe good order of the court in quene Annes tyme.that in all her time, she neuer se better order, amonges the Ladies and gentlewomen of the court, then was in this good Quenes dayes, who kept her maides and such as were about her so occupied in sowinge and worckynge of shirtes and smockes for the pore, that neither was there seene anye Idlenes then amonges them, nor anye leasure to folow such pastimes as daily are sene now a daies to raign in princes Courtes.

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MarginaliaThe kyngs deuorsed frō Ladi katherine. & from the pope both at one tyme.Thus the king being deuorsed from the lady Dowager his brothers wife, marryed thys gracious Lady, making a prosperous and happy chaunge for vs, beinge deuorced from the foresaid Princesse, and also from the pope both at one time. Notwithstāding good and godly purposes are neuer wythoute some incommodity or trouble folowing, so it hapned in this deuorcement, that the said Princes procuryng from Rome, the Popes curse, caused bothe the king and the realme to be interdited, whereof more is here after to be spoken.

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Marginalia1534. quene Anne crowned.In the meane time Quene Anne shortly after her marriage, being greate with childe, the next yere folowing which was 1534. after the first deuorcement publikelye proclaymed, was crowned with high solempnity at Westminster. Marginaliaquene Elizabeth borne.And not long after her Coronation, the vii. day of September she was broughte a bed and deliuered of a faire Ladye, for whose good deliueraunce Te Deum was songe in all places, and greate preparation made for the Christeninge.

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The Mayor and his brethren wyth xl. of the chefe Citezens were commaunded to be presēt wyth all the Nobles and Gentlemen, the kinges pallace and all the walles betwene that and the Friers was hanged wyth Arras, and the Friers Church. Also the fonte was of syluer, and stode in the middest of the Church iii. steppes high, which was couered wyth a fyne clothe, and diuers gentlemen wyth apronnes and Towels aboute their neckes gaue attenduance aboute it, ouer the fonte honge a fayre canapy of Crimson satten, fringed with gold. About it was a raile, couered with Saie. Betwene the Quier and the body of the Church, was a close place with a pan of fyre, to make the childe readye in. These thinges thus ordered, the childe was brought into the Hall, and then euery man set forwarde.

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Firste the Citezens two and two, then the Gentlemen, Esquires, and Chaplaines, nexte after folowed the Aldermen and the Mayor alone. Nexte the Mayor, followed the kynges Councell. Then the kinges Chappell. Then Barons, Bishoppes, and Earles. Then came the Earle of Essex, bearinge the couered Basens gilte, after him the Marques of Exetor wyth the Taper of virgine waxe. Nexte hym, the Marques Dorset bearing the salt, behinde him the Lady Mary of Norfolke bearynge the Chrisome, which was very rych of pearle and stone. The olde Duchesse of Norfolke bare the childe in a mantle of purple Veluet, wyth a longe traine furred wyth Ermine. The Duke of Norfolke with his marshal rod, went on þe righthād of the said Duches, & the duke of Suffolke on the left hand. Before them, went the officers of armes. The Countes of Kent bare the longe traine of the Chyldes mantell.

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