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566 [510]

Actes and Monumentes Of the Churche.

Betwene the Countesse and the childe, went the Earle of Wylshire on the right hand, and the Earle of Darby on the left hande, supporting the saide traine. In the middest ouer the childe, was borne a canapy by the Lord Rochford, the Lord Hussey, the Lord William Haward, and the Lord Thomas Haward thelder In this order, they came vnto the church dore where the bishop of London met it, wyth dyuers Abbots and bishops, and began the obseruances of the sacrrament. MarginaliaCranmer godfather to Quene Elizabeth.The Archbishop of Caunterbury was Godfather. And the olde Duches of Norfolk, & the old Marchiones of Dorset widowes, were Godmothers, and the childe was named Elizabeth.

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After all thinges were doone at the churche dore, the childe was broughte to the fonte and Christened. This done, Garter, the chief king of armes cried aloud. God of his infinite goodnes, send prosperous life and long to the high and mighty princes of England Elizabeth. Then the Trompettes blewe, and the chylde was brought vp to the aultare, and immediatly cōfirmed by tharchbishop. The Marchiones of Exceter being Godmother. Then tharchbishop of Canterbury gaue to the princes a stādinge cuppe of gold. The Duches of Norfolke gaue to her a standinge cuppe of gold, fretted with pearle. The Marchiones of Dorset, thre gilt bolles pounced wyth a couer. The Marchiones of Exeter, thre standing bolles, gylt and grauen with a couer. And so after a solempne banket ended wyth Ipocras, wafers, and such like in great plenty, they returned in like order again vnto the Court with the princes, and so departed.

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AS the mariage of this noble Lady was no smal ioy vnto al good & godly men, and no lesse hope of prosperous successe to Gods true religion, so in like manner on the cōtrary part the papistes wanted not their malicious & seacreat attemptes, as by the false hipocrisy, and fained holines of a false fained hipocrite, thys yere being espied and found out, may sufficiētlye appeare, what their deuelishe deuises and purposes were. For certain Monkes, Fryers, and other euil disposed persons of a Deuelysh intent, had put into the heades of many of the kinges subiectes, that they had releuatyon of God and his saintes, þt he was highly displeased with king Henry, for the deuorcement of þe lady Katherine, and surmised amonges other things, that god had reueled to a noon, MarginaliaThe maide of Kent wyth her false fained hipocrisy apprehended.named Elizabeth Barton, whō they called the holye maid of Kent, that in case the king proceded to the said diuorce, he shoulde not be king of thys realme, one moneth after, & in the reputatyon of God, not one day nor hour. This Elizabeth Barton by false dissimulation practised & shewed to the people, maruailus alteratiō of her visage & other partes of her body. As if she hadben rapt or in a traunce, & in those fained trāces by false hipocrisy as thoughe she had bene inspired of God, she spake many wordes in rebukinge of sinne, and reprouinge the Gospell whiche she called heresies, and amonge them vttered diuers thinges to the great reproch of the King and Quene. And to the establishyng of Idolatrye, Pilgrimage, and the derogatyon of Gods glory, which her naughtines beynge spied oute by the great laboure and dilygence of the Archbishop of Caunterburye, the Lorde Cromwel, & master Hugh Latimer priest, she was condempned & put to death wyth certain of her affinitie and counsell in the monethe of Apryll.

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¶ William Tracy Esquire of Glocester shire.

A Litle before this time 

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The account which follows is word-for-word from Edward Hall'schronicle. (See Edward Hall, The union of the two noble and illustre famelies ofLancastre and York [London, 1548], STC 12721, fo. 211r-v).

was ther a worshipful Esquier in Glocester shire called William Tracy of Todington which made in his wil that he wold no funeral pompe at his burying, neither passed he vpon Masse, and farther said that he trusted in God only, and hoping by him to be saued, & not by no saint 
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William Tracy was a prominent member of a leading Gloucestershire family and he was a former sheriff of the county. His will aroused considerablecontroversy because of its outspoken declaration of justification nby faith without theassistance of works. Manuscript copies of the will circulated extensively. (See John Craig and Caroline Litzenberger, 'Wills as Religious Propaganda: The Testament of William Tracy', Journal of Ecclesiastical History 44 [1993], pp. 415-31). In 1535, a copy of the will, with commentaries by William Tyndale and John Frith, was printedin Antwerp: the testament of master William Tracie esquier (Antwerp, 1535), STC 24167.

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. This gentleman died, and hys sonne as executor, brought the wil to the bishoppe of Cantorbury to proue, which he shewed to the conuocation, & there vnaduisedly they iudged him to be taken out of þe ground, and to be brēt as an heriticke 
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Foxe (following Hall's chronicle) is condensing extemely complex and protracted proceedings. Convocation debated Tracy's will in different sessions for fifteen months before Tracy was finally condemned (posthumously) as a heretic and the exhumation of his body ordered. (See John T. Day, 'William Tracy's Posthumous Legal Problems' in William Tyndale and the Law, ed. John A. R. Dick and Anne Richardson [Kirksville, MO, 1994], pp. 108-10).

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, & sent a commissyon to doctor Parker, chaūcelor of þe dioces of Worcester to execute their sentence, which accomplished the same. The king hearing his subiect to be exhumate & brent without his knowledge or order of his law, sent for the Chauncelor & layde the high offence to him, which excused him by the Archbishop of Cauntorbury whiche was late dead 
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I.e., Parker, the chancellor of the diocese, claimed that he was acting on the orders of the archbishop of Canterbury.

: but in conclusion it cost him CCC. poūd to haue his pardō 
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Matthew Parker, the chancellor of the diocese of Worcester (not to be confused with the Elizabethan archbishop of Canterbury of the same name) burned Tracy's body in addition to exhuming it. This burning - but not the exhumation - was a violation of the statute De heretico comburendo, which mandated the punishments for heresy. Under this statute, it was illegal to burn a heretic, livingor dead, without receipt of a writ from Chancery and, in any case, the burning wasto be managed by secular officials. Whether Tracy's body was burned on the orders of the Archbishop Warham or not (Parker, the chancellor of the diocese, claimed that he was acting on the orders of the archbishop of Canterbury), Parker did not have a writ and he conducted the burning himself. Richard Tracy, William's son, petitioned the king, asking that Parker be punished for this violation of the law. Ultimately Parker was fined £100. (See John T. Day, 'William Tracy's Posthumous Legal Problems' in William Tyndale and the Law, ed. John A. R. Dick and Anne Richardson [Kirksville, MO, 1994], pp. 110-11).

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. But yet for a farther truth to be knowen of this gentlemans deathe, and the cruel ignorancy of the bishops, I haue here expressed his wil, word by word as followeth.

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MarginaliaThe testament of Trasy.In the name of God Amen, I William Tracy of Todington in the countye of Glocester Esquire, make my Testament and last wil, as here after foloweth. Fyrst and before al other thinges I commit me vnto God and to hys mercy, beleuing wythout any dout or mistrust that by his grace & the merits of Iesus Christ and by the vertue of hys passion, and of his resurrection, I haue & shal haue remission of my sinnes, and resurrection of body & soule, according as it is wrytten, I beleue that my redeamer liueth, and that in the last day I shal ryse out of thearth, and in my flesh shal se my sauior, this my hope is laid vp in my bosome. 

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Job 19: 25.

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And touching the welth 

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I.e., the health.

of my soul, the faith þt I haue taken and rehersed is suffyciēt (as I suppose) wtout ani other mās work or works. 
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It is this statement, declaring that faith, without works, was allthat was necessary salvation, which made this will hertetical.

My
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