Navigate the 1563 Edition
PrefaceBook 1Book 2Book 3Book 4Book 5
Critical Apparatus for this Page
Commentary on the Text
Names and Places on this Page
Unavailable for this Edition
654 [598]

Actes and Monumentes of the Church.

of, who finally ended the conuocation, with these wordes: for so muche O reuerent father, as you deny that the Christian faith & Religiō doth consiste onely in those thynges, whiche are left vnto vs by God in the scriptures, if I shall manifest vnto you by euident reason that it is false, I thynke you wyll graunte it vnto me, that there is no more Sacramentes then those, whiche the euident authorities of scripture do confyrme. Whiche the byshop not denying to do, the conuocation brake vp.

[Back to Top]

The next daye when the byshoppes were set agayne, the Archebyshop of Caunterbury sendyng his Archedeadon, commaunded Alesius to abstaine from disputation, whereupon he wrote his mynde and delyuered it vnto Cromwell, who afterwarde shewed the same vnto the byshoppes 

Commentary  *  Close

This marks the end of Alexander Alesius's account of the synod. Ostensibly, Alesius was asked to withdraw because the bishops were offended by the presence of an outsider speaking in their assembly, but it was probably because Alesius's outspoken defence of retaining only two sacraments - clearly supported by Cromwell - was too radical for most of them.

[Back to Top]
. Thus through the industry of Cromwel, the coloquies were brought to this ende, that albeit Religion could not wholie be reformed, yet at that tyme there was some reformation had throughout all Englande.

[Back to Top]

At the last, thre yeare 

Commentary  *  Close

In 1563, Foxe blamed Cromwell's fall on Henry's dissatisfaction with his marriage to Anne of Cleves, which Cromwell had arranged. Contrast this account with the more'factional' interpretation of Cromwell's fall introduced in 1570, whereby Foxe presents a more sophisticated analysis of Cromwell's fall, emphasizing the role of opposing factions.

[Back to Top]
after al this was done, Cromwell beyng circumuented with the malicious craft and pollycie of dyuers, that by occasion of mention made, touchyng the kyngs dyuorce with the ladie Anne of Cleue: he hadde sayde these wordes. MarginaliaThe cause of Cromewels death That he wyshed his dagger in hym that hadde dissolued or broken that mariage. Whereupon it was obiected against hym by Thomas Duke of Norfolke & other, that it was spoken against the kynge, who at that tyme beyng in loue with Katherine Haward was the chief cause and authour of that diuorce, whereupon dyuerse of the nobles conspyring against hym some for hatred, & some for Religions sake, he was cast into the tower of London. Where as it happened (as it were by a certayne fatall destenie) that where as he a litle before had made a lawe, that whosoeuer was cast into þe tower, should be put to death without examination, he hym selfe suffered by the same lawe. it is sayde, (whiche also I do easely credite) that he made this violent lawe, not so muche for any crueltie or tyranny, as onely for a certayne secret purpose, to haue entangled the byshop of Wynchester, who albeit he was without doubt, the moste violent aduersarie of Christe and his Religion, notwithstandyng God, peraduenture woulde not haue his Religion set fourth by any wycked crueltie or otherwyse, then were mete & conuenient. But this is moste certayne, that the kyng dyd afterwarde greatly and earnestly repente hys death, but alas to late, who was heard oftentymes to saye, that nowe he lacked his Cromwell.

[Back to Top]

The xxviii. day of Iuly he was brought to þe scaffolde on tower hyll, where he sayed these wordes folowyng. 

Commentary  *  Close

Cromwell's scaffold speech and prayer are taken from Edward Hall, The union of two noble and illustre famelies of Lancastre and Yorke (London, 1560), STC 12723a, fo. 242r-v.

I am come hether to die, and not to purge MarginaliaThe wordes of good Cromwell at his deathmy selfe, as may happen, some thynke that I wyll, for if I shoulde so doo, I were a verye wretche and myser: I am by the lawe condemned to die, and thanke my Lord God that hath appoynted me this death for myne offēce: For sithence the tyme that I haue had yeares of discretion, I haue lyued a synner, and offended my Lorde God, for the whiche I aske him hartely forgeuenes. And it is not vnknowen to many of you, that I haue ben a great traueler in this worlde, and beyng but of a base degre, was called to hyghe estate, & sythens the tyme I came thereunto, I haue offended my prynce, for the whiche I aske him hartely forgeuenes, and beseche you all to praye to God with me, that he wyl forgeue me. O father forgeue me. O sonne forgeue me, O holy ghoste forgeue me: O thre persones in one God forgeue me. And nowe I praye you that be here, to beare me recorde, I die in the Catholike faythe, not doubtyng in any artycle of my faythe, no nor doubtyng in any Sacrament of the churche. Many hath sclaundered me, and reported that I haue been a bearer, of suche as hath maynteigned euyll opinions, whiche is vntrue, but I confesse that lyke as God by his holy spyrit, doth instructe vs in the truthe, so the deuyll is ready to seduce vs, and I haue been seduced: but beare me wytnes that I dye in the Catholyke fayth of the holy churche. And I hartelye desyre you to praye for the kynges grace, that he may longe lyue with you, in healthe and prosperitie. And þt after hym his sonne prynce Edwarde, that goodly ympe, may long reigne ouer you. And once again I desyre you to pray for me, that so long as lyfe remaigneth in this fleshe, I wauer nothyng in my fayth. And thē made he his prayer, whiche was long, but not so long, as both godly and learned, and after committed his soule, into the handes of God, and so paciently suffered the stroke of the axe, by a ragged and boocherly myser, whiche very vngodly perfourmed the office.

[Back to Top]

This valiaunt Souldier and captayne of Christe the foresayde Lorde Cromwell, as he was moste studious of hym selfe in a flagrant zeale to set forwarde the truthe of the Gospel, sekyng all meanes and wayes to beate down false Religion and to aduaunce the true: So he always retayned vnto hym, and had about hym suche as could be founde to be helpers & furtherers of the same. in the nomber of whom were sundry and dyuerse freshe and quicke wyttes, pertainyng to his famyly, by whose industrie and ingenious labours, diuerse excellent both ballades and bookes were contriued and set abroade, concernyng the suppression of the Pope and all Popyshe idolatrie. Amongst the whiche omytting a great sort þt we might here bryng in, yet this small treatise here followyng, called the fantasies of Idolatrie 

Commentary  *  Close

This ballad was written by William Gray, a client of Thomas Cromwell. (On Gray's life and career, see E. W. Dormer, Gray of Reading: A Sixteenth-century Controversialist and Ballad Writer [Reading, 1923], pp.17-55). The ballad described cases of 'idolatry' and fraudulent miracles uncovered by Cromwell's commissioners. Verses from the poem were placed on Friar Forest's scaffold. This confirms the official origins and inception.

[Back to Top]
, we

[Back to Top]
thought
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield