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so the saide lorde deputy and a great part of the councell, gaue him maruelous great praise and thanks for it, and the saide Lorde deputy offered vnto him, a chamber in his own house to dine and sup euery meale at his owne messe to haue a man or. ii. of his to waite vpon him, & to haue what so euer it were that he lacked if it were to be had for mony, yea and what hee would in his purs for his bokes or otherwise. So as he woulde tary there among them, and preach onely so longe as it should seeme good to him self. Who refusinge the same his lordeshipps great offer, most hartely thanked him for the same. And besought him to be onely so good vnto him, as to apointe him some quiet and honest place in the toune where he might not be disturbed nor molested but haue oportunity to geue him selfe to his booke, and would dayly ones in the fornone and again by one a clocke, after none by þe grace of God preache amonge them accordinge vnto the talent that God had lent him. At which aunswere the lord deputy greatly reioysed and thervpon sēt for the foresaide William Steuens whome he ernestly required to receiue and lodge the said damlip in his house promising what soeuer he should commaund, to see paid wyth the most. and moreouer did send euery meal from his on messe a dish of the best vnto them and in deede so did, albeit the sayd Damlip refused that offer, shewinge his Lordeshippe that thin diett, was most conuenient for studients, yet could not that restrayne him but that euerye meale he sent it.

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This godly man by the space of xx. dayes or more. Twise euery day preached very godly lernedly and plainly the truth of the blessed sacrament of Christes body and blood, mightely inueinge against all papistrie and confutinge the same. 

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In other words, Damplip preached against the Real Presence of Christ in the Sacrament. Henry VIII would have regarded such sermons as heresy.

MarginaliaDamlip preacheth against trāsubstantiation and the Romishe masse. But especiallye those two mooste pernicious erroures or heresies, trifelinge Transubstantiation and the pestelente propitiatorye Sacrifice of the Romishe masse, by true conference of þe scriptures, and applienge of thauncient doctours, ernestly therewith of ten times exhortinge the people to returne frō there popery, declaring how popish he himselfe had bene, and how by the detestable wickednes that he did se vniuersally in rome he was retourned so far homeward, and now became an enemy throgh goddes grace to all papistry shewinge there with that if gaine or ambicion could haue moued him to the cōtrary, he might haue bene enterteined of Cardinall Poole, as you haue hard before, but for very conscience saked ioined with true knowledge groūded on godes most holy word, he now vtterly abhorred all papistry and willed them most ernestly to do the same.

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But after. xx. dayes (I say) or litle more, whilest the audience was so great, and he so high-ly commended both of the counsell and of the communalty as no man in many yeres hadde bin so before, one called I. Doue than prior of the White Friers 

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Foxe's fondness for a pun is a little confusing here; John Dove, was the prior of the Carmelites (Whitefriars) in Calais. Dove was a religious conservative and an ally of Lord Lisle.

began to preach, or rather to barke against him, yet after the saide Adams had in thre or foure sermons confuted the said friers erroneous doctrin of trāsubstantiacion and of the propitiatory sacrifice of the masse: He outewardelye seamed to geue place ceasing openly to preach, and secretly practised to peach him by letters sent vnto the clargy here in Englād, MarginaliaDamlip preached. so that with in. viii. or. x. days after, the said Damlipe was sent for to apeare before the bishop of Canterbury, with whome was assistant Steuen Garner, bishop of Winchester, Doctor Sampson bishop of Chichester and diuers other before whome he most constantly affirmed and defended the doctrine which he had taught, in such sort aunsweringe cōfuting and solutinge þe obiectiōs, as his aduersaries yea euen amonge other the lerned godly and blessed martir most meke cranemer thā yet but a Lutherian marueled at it: And wher the other Bishoppes thretned shortly to confute him with there accustomed argument of euell fauored mode and figure, I meane of fire and fagot, if he shuld stil stād to the defence of that he had spoken, he constātly aunswered that he would the next day deliuer vnto them fully so much in writing as he had said: Wher vnto also he would stand. Wherevpō the next day at the our appointed to apere, when they loked surely to haue apprehended him: In the meane seasonne he hadde seacret intimation from my lord of Canterbury that if he did any more personally appeare he should be committed vnto warde, not like to escape cruell death, (playnge in deede then somewhat olde Adams part) for such is man leafe in his owne handes, had him commended vnto them and sent them foure shetes of paper lernedly written in the latten tounge, conteininge his faith with his argumentes, conferences, of the scriptures, and allegations of the Doctoures, by a messenger of frende of his, but steppinge him self a side through fere and frailty of the flesh. Whose godly doctrine had takē neuerthelesse such depe rote in the hartes of a greate nomber of the people, yea of old wiues, and hoare headed menne, that a greate noumber of such coulde quickly descrye a Papist superstitious from a true preacher, when anye suche treated of the blessed sacrament. But leauing here for a time to speake of this godlye manne, I wil retourne to him againe, as iuste occasyon shall serue. 
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In the passages above, Foxe is presenting a simplified view of a complex series of events. John Butler, Cranmer's commissary, attempted to rescue Damplip by having summoned back to Lambeth for examination by Cranmer. In the meantime, Thomas Cromwell weighed in on Damplip's side. Dove was grilled thoroughly about his actions and Cromwell sent Lisle a blistering reprimand. However, the accusations of sacramentarian heresy clearly alarmed the king. Cromwell had to open an investigation of sacramentarians in Calais and Lisle was able to force a second hearing for Damplip. It was this second hearing that Damplip fled. (For the outline of these events see A. J. Slavin, 'Cromwell, Cranmer and Lord Lisle, a study in the politics of reform', Albion 9 [1977], pp. 325-33 and Diarmaid MacCulloch, Thomas Cranmer [New Haven and London, 1996], pp. 218-19).

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Vpon that his departure the kings maiesty was aduertised that there was great dissention and deuersity of pernitious opinions in his said towne of Callais, greatly tending to the daunger and none suretye of the same. Wher

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