Navigate the 1563 Edition
PrefaceBook 1Book 2Book 3Book 4Book 5
Critical Apparatus for this Page
Commentary on the Text
Names and Places on this Page
Unavailable for this Edition
718 [662]

Actes and Monumentes of the Church.

sweared that he was sory that he hadde offended my Lorde or any other, but what he hadde spoken, he spake it of charitye and pitye taken on the simple poore manne, and there with he helde his peace. But the truthe is, that throughe the cauillation of Winchester rose more contention then profit neadful about the lorde and our Lord, the papistes holding with Winchester, and thother part with the Lorde. But now to retourne to the said Raphe Hares examination again, within halfe an houre after Doctor Gwent had blamed the said Broke for that he spake in the behalfe of Raphe Hare. Whilest the said Broke was there present, & standinge by, he harde amonge the names of those that were by the counsell of Calleis letters charged with pernitious errours and heresies, him selfe named and called. Some of the Commissioners answearinge yea yea, but it makes no matter, lette him alone tyll hereafter. At the muttering forth of which words, the said Broke stode forth and said, I know & it like your honours, no mo Thomas Brokes of Caleis but my selfe, is it your Lordshippes pleasures to haue anye thinge with me? Naye master Broke answeared the Commissyoners we maye not meddle with you, and that you knowe right well: or elsse we suppose you would not haue bene here now. You consider you are a Burges of the Parliament. Truthe it is sayde Broke, that vnworthelye so I am, but if your Lordshippes, and the reaste of the Commissioners haue anye thing where wyth to charge me, I here openlye renounce the priueledge of that highe Courte, 

Commentary  *  Close

As an MP, Broke was normally exempt from punishment for any remarks that he made in debate in Commons.

and submit my selfe to the lawes of the Realme, to aunswer to that that maye be obiected againste me. Wryte scribe sayde Winchester. And straight way the said Broke was commaunded not to depart without licence.

[Back to Top]

Furthermore they commaunding him to be hadde a side, least he should geue anye instructions vnto Raphe Hare. Then they called againe for the saide Raph Hare, and there charged him with manye hainous and detestable erroures, MarginaliaAccusaciōs against Raphe Hare namelye that he was a greate reader of the newe Testamente in Englishe, that he was suche a one, that in deede, neyther vsed to take holye breade, holye Water, holye Ashes, nor holye Palme, but spake againste them, and against Auriculer confessyon also, wherefore they threatned him, that if he would stand in the defence of these thinges, and of suche other as woulde euidentlye be layde and proued againste him, it woulde coste hym his life. Whiche woordes draue the manne yet into a greater agonye and feare, whiche thyng Winchester well perceiuinge said vnto him. Raphe Hare, Raphe Hare, by my trouthe I pity thee much. For in good faythe I thinke thee to be agood simple manne, and of thy selfe wouldest meane well inoughe, but that thou haste had shrewed and subtile scholemasters, that haue seduced the good poore simple sole, and therefore I pitye thee, and it were in deede pitye that thou shouldest be burnte, for thou arte a goodlye fellowe, a tall manne, and haste serued the kynge ryghte well in his warres, 

Commentary  *  Close

Ralph Hare was a soldier in the Calais garrison.

I haue hearde thee well commended, and thou arte yet able to doo the kinge as good seruyce as euer thou waste, and we all wil be a meane to his grace to be good and gratious Lord vnto thee, and thou wylte take pitye of thy selfe and leaue thy erroures. For I date saye for vs all that be Commissyoners, that we would be lothe that thou shouldest be caste away, for alasse pore simple manne we perceiue thou hast beene seduced (I saye) by others.

[Back to Top]

How sayest thou therefore, thou knowest my Lorde of Cantorburies grace here, is a good gentle Lord, and woulde be lothe thou should be cast away. Tell me, canste thou be content to submit thy selfe vnto him, and to stand vnto suche order, as he and we shall take in thys matter, how sayst thou man speake? The pore man there with fallinge vppon his knees, and sheddinge teares aunswered, speakynge to my Lordes grace of Cauntorburye. My good lord for Christes sake be good vnto me, and I referre my selfe vnto your graces order, do wyth me what you please. The bishopp of Caunterburye consideringe what daunger he was readye to fall in and pityinge the same (thoughe the simplicity of the manne was so great that he perceiued it not) sayde, naye Raphe Hare stande vppe and aduyse thy selfe well, and commit not thy selfe to me, for I am but one man, and in Commission, but as the other are, so that it lieth in me to doo nothing. But if thou do commit thy selfe vnto vs all, then thou committes thy selfe vnto the lawe, and the lawe is ordained to doo euerye manne right. goo to Raphe Hare saide Winchester, submitte thy selfe to my Lorde and vs, it is best for thee to doo so. Where vppon he fell vpon his knees againe and saide, my Lordes and masters all, I submitte my selfe wholye vnto you. And therewyth all a booke was holde him, and an othe geuen hym to be obediente vnto them, and to all Ecclesiasticall lawes: and straight way he was enioyned to abiure, and to beare a Fagotte, three seuerall dayes, and more ouer the poore manne loste the liuinge that he hadde at Calleis.

[Back to Top]

This symple manne hearynge his penance, pitiouslye lamented and earnestlye at the firste denyed to stande there vnto, with pitious exclamation, sayinge. O my Lord of Winchester my Lorde of Winchester, haue you made me a logge redye to be layed vpon the fire whē so euer any wicked mā falsly of malice by prouo

[Back to Top]
cation
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield