Critical Apparatus for this Page
Commentary on the Text
Names and Places on this Page
Unavailable for this Edition
1003 [1003]

K. Hen. 8. Tho. Bernard, John Scriuener, &c. Martyrs. Tho. Dorman. D. Colet.

so euer they should see, or suspect hereafter to teach hold, or mainteyne the same.

¶ Here folow the names of them, whiche were condemned for relaps, and committed vnto the secular power.

AMong these aforenamed persons, which thus submitted them selues, and were put to penaunce, certaine there were, which because they had bene abiured before, MarginaliaVid. supr. pag. 917.as is aboue mencioned, pag. 917. vnder Byshop Smith, were now condemned for relaps, and had sentence read agaynst them, and so were committed to the seculare arme, to be burned: Whose names here folow.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaAn. 1521.

Martyrs.

Thomas Bernard.
Iames Morden.

Robert Raue.
Iohn Scriuener. 
Commentary  *  Close

The signification of the excommunication and relaxation of these four people survives as TNA, C/85/115/13.

Of these mention is made before, both touchyng their abiuration, and also their martyrdome, pag. 917. vnto whom we may adioyne.

Ioanne Norman.Thomas Holmes.

MarginaliaThomas Holmes. Vid. supr. pag. 949.This Thomas Holmes, 

Commentary  *  Close

Thomas Holmes informed against so many people that even Foxe is reluctant to credit him as a martyr; yet it was not enough to save him. Why he was treated with such unusual severity is unclear.

albeit he had disclosed and detected many of his brethren, as in the Table aboue is expressed, pag. 949. thynkyng therby to please the Byshop and to saue him self, & was thought to be a seed mā of the Bishop for the same: yet notwithstandyng in the sayd Byshops Register appeareth the Sentence of relaps, and condemnatiō written and drawen out agaynst him: and most lyke, that hee was also adiudged and executed with the other.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaChildren cōpelled to set fire to their owne father.¶ As touchyng the burnyng of Iohn Scriuener, here is to be nioted, that his children were compelled to set fire vnto their father, in lyke maner as Ioanne Clerke also daughter of William Tilseworth, was constrayned to geue fire to þe burnyng of her owne naturall father, as is aboue specified, pag. 917 

Commentary  *  Close

See Phillipe de Commines, De Carlo Octavo…et bello Neapolitano Commentarii, trans. Johann Sleidan (Paris, 1561), pp. 205-12. Notice how, once again, Foxe is emphasizing the evil effects of persecution upon families.

. The example of whiche crueltie, as it is contrary both to God & nature, so hath it not bene sene nor heard of in the memory of the heathen.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaA Note of Thomas Dorman.Where moreouer is to be noted, that at the burnyng of this Iohn Scriuener, one Thomas Dorman, 

Commentary  *  Close

This is the 'Yomand Dorman' (i.e., yeoman Dorman) listed before by Foxe.

mentioned before, pag. 917. was present and bare a fagot at Amersham: Whose abiuratiō was afterward layd agaynst hym, at what tyme hee should depose for recouery of certeine landes, from the schole of Barchamsted. This Thomas Dorman (as I am credibly informed of certeine aboute Amersham) 
Commentary  *  Close

For other evidence of Foxe's conducting inquiries among those still living about past persecutions in the chiltern, see the sources used for information on William Tilesworth and Thomas Chase: for information on both of these men, Foxe used aged informants whose accounts proved remarkably accurate.

was then vncle to this our Dorman, 
Commentary  *  Close

Thomas Dorman, a Catholic polemicist and critic of Foxe. Foxe refers, in his marginal note, to the opening sentence of Thomas Dorman's dedication to his A proofe of certayne articles in religion (Antwerp, 1564), STC 7062, in which Dorman described himself as having been 'a young novyce of Calvins religion.

[Back to Top]
and found hym to schole at Barchamsted vnder M. Reeue, MarginaliaThis M. Dorman, because hee was put to schole by hys vncle at Barchamstede to M. Reeue, being a protestant, therefore he for the same cause, in the firste sentēce of his preface, saith, that hee was brought vp in Caluins scholewhiche nowe so vncharitably abuseth his penne in writyng agaynste the contrary doctrine, and rayleth so fiercely agaynst the bloud of Christes slayne seruauntes, myscallyng them to be a donghill of stynking Martyrs. 
Commentary  *  Close

Dorman never said this. Foxe has apparently confused Dorman with Thomas Harding, who called Foxe's book, 'that huge dungehill of your stinking martyrs which you have intituled the Actes and Monumentes' (Thomas Harding, Confutation of a Book intituled an Apology of the Church of England [Antwerp, 1565], STC 12762, fos. 13v-14r). The phrase afterwards became something of a Catholic trope.

[Back to Top]

[Back to Top]

Well, how soeuer the sauour of these good Martyrs do sent in the nose of M. Dorman, I doubt not but they geue a better odour and sweter smell in the presence of the Lord: Preciosa enim in cōspectu Domini mors sanctorum eius. Precious is in the sight of the Lord, the death of his sainctes. 

Commentary  *  Close

Dorman never said this. Foxe has apparently confused Dorman with Thomas Harding, who called Foxe's book, 'that huge dungehill of your stinking martyrs which you have intituled the Actes and Monumentes' (Thomas Harding, Confutation of a Book intituled an Apology of the Church of England [Antwerp, 1565], STC 12762, fos. 13v-14r). The phrase afterwards became something of a Catholic trope.

[Back to Top]
And therefore howe soeuer it shall please M. Dorman, with reprochefull language to misterme the good Martyrs of Christes, or rather Christ in his Marytrs, his vnsemely vsage more cartlyke thē clerkelyke, is not greatly to be weyed. For as the daunger of his blasphemie hurteth not them whiche are gone: so the contumelie and reproche therof, as well comprehendeth hys owne kyndred, frendes, & countrey, as any other els: and especiallye redoundeth to him selfe & woundeth hys own soule & none els, vnto the great prouoking of Gods wrath agaynst him, vnles hee be blessed with better grace by tyme to repente.

[Back to Top]
¶ Doctour Colet.

MarginaliaIohn Colet Deane of Paules.MVch about this tyme 

Commentary  *  Close
Colet, Chaucer and Gower

This section epitomizes Foxe approaching one of his major themes, the existence of the True Church before Luther, from a novel angle. In the preceding sections dealing with the Lollards in the dioceses of Lincoln and London, Foxe emphasized their numbers and tried to show that an understanding of the gospel preceded the Reformation. In this section, Foxe tries to make the same point, by providing the examples of a few well-known Reform-minded English clergyman - John Colet and William Grocyn - and also the examples of two English anticlerical authors, Geoffrey Chaucer and John Gower. (It should be emphasized that all of the figures discussed in this section were, contrary to Foxe's implications, orthodox Catholics - particularly Colet and Grocyn - and that none of them can justly considered a Lollard sympathiser, much less a proto-Protestant).

[Back to Top]

For Colet and Grocyn, Foxe's sources were various writings of Erasmus, although he judiciously edited them. For Gower and Chaucer he draws largely on John Bale's Catalogus.

Thomas S. Freeman
University of Sheffield

, or not past ij. yeres before, dyed D. Iohn Colet, of whom mention was made in þe Table aboue, pag. 953. To whose sermons these Knowen men about Buckynghāshyre, had a great mind to resorte. 
Commentary  *  Close

Foxe is interested in demonstrating the zeal of the Lollards in acquiring godly literature, but this is also an indication of the affluence of many of these Lollards. On the importance of books to the Lollards see Margaret Aston, 'Lollardy and Literacy' in Lollards and Reformers: Images and and literacy in late medieval England (London, 1984), pp. 1-47.

[Back to Top]
After he 
Commentary  *  Close

The following account of Colet is abridged from Erasmus's mini- biography in Colet in his letter to Justas Jonas, dated 13 June 1521. (The letter is printed is epistle 1211 in The Correspondence of Erasmus, Letters 1122-1251, trans. R. A. B. Mynors and annotated Pieter G. Bietenholz [Toronto, 1998]; the section on Colet is on pp. 233-43). Foxe's abridgement involves more than saving space. While Foxe is accurate in what prints, he omits certain details Erasmus provided - such as Colet's celibacy, his avoiding the company of laymen, his desire to join the Carthusians and his strong approval of auricular confession - that do not fit with Foxe's idea of a proto-Protestant divine.

[Back to Top]
came from Italy and Paris, he first began to read the Epistles of S. Paule openly in Oxford, MarginaliaPaules Epistles first read opēly in Oxford.in stead of Scotus and Thomas. From thence he was called by the kyng, and made Deane of Paules: where he accustomed much to preache, not without great auditorie, as well of the kynges court, as of the Citizens and other. MarginaliaThe commendation of Doctor Colet.His diet was frugall: his life vpright: in discipline he was seuere: In somuch þt his Canons, because of their strayter rule, complained that they were made lyke monkes. The honest and honorable state of matrimonie he euer preferred before the vnchast singlenes of priests. 
Commentary  *  Close

Foxe is interested in demonstrating the zeal of the Lollards in acquiring godly literature, but this is also an indication of the affluence of many of these Lollards. On the importance of books to the Lollards see Margaret Aston, 'Lollardy and Literacy' in Lollards and Reformers: Images and and literacy in late medieval England (London, 1984), pp. 1-47.

[Back to Top]
At his dyner commonly was read either some chapter of S. Paul, or of Salomons Prouerbes. Hee neuer vsed to suppe. And althoughe the blindnes of that tyme, caryed him away after the cōmon errour of Popery: yet in rypenes of iudgement hee semed somthyng to incline from the vulgare trade of that age. The religious orders of Monkes and Friers he phātised not: As neither he could greatly fauour the barbarous diuinitie of the schole doctours, as of Scotus, but least of all, of Thomas Aquine: MarginaliaColetes iudgement of Thom. Aquine.In somuch that when Erasmus speakyng in the prayse of Thomas Aquine, did cōmend hym þt he had read many old authors, & had writtē diuers new workes, as Catena aurea, & such like, to proue and to know his iudgement: Colet first supposing that Erasmus had spoken in ieast, but after perceauyng that hee ment good fayth, brusteth out in great vehemēcie, saying: what tell you me (quod he) of the commendation of that man, who except he had ben of an arrogant and presumptuous spirite, would not define and discusse all thinges so boldly and rashely: and also except hee had bene rather worldly minded then heauenly, would neuer haue so polluted Christes whole doctrine with mans prophane doctrine, in such sorte as hee hath done.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaD. Colet accused.The Byshop of London at that tyme was Fitziames, of age no lesse then 80. 

Commentary  *  Close

Foxe is repeating Erasmus's estimate of Bishop Fitzjames's age. The bishop's date of birth is unknown, but he must have been in his seventies at this time.

Who bearyng long grudge and displeasure agaynst Colet, with other ij. Byshops taking his parte, like to him selfe, entred action of complaynt agaynst Colet to the Archb. of Cant. beyng then W. Waram. The matter of his cōplaint was diuided into. iij Articles. The first was for speaking against worshippyng of Images. The second was about hospitalitie, for þt he entreating vpon þe place of the Gospell, pasce, pasce, pasce, feede, feede, feede: when he had expounded the ij. first, for feadyng with example of lyfe and with doctrine, in the third, whiche the scholemen do expound for feedyng with hospitalitie, he left out the outward feadyng of the bely, & applyed it an other waye. 
Commentary  *  Close

In other words, Colet argued that the gospel command, 'Feed my sheep' was meant spiritually, but not materially. The passage had been used to argue that the clergy were enjoined to hospitality, but Colet's understanding of the passage was hardly novel.

The third crime wherwith they charged him, was for speaking agaynst such as vsed to preach onely by bosome Sermons, declaring nothing els to þe people, but as they bring in their papers wt thē. 
Commentary  *  Close

In other words, Colet criticized those who read their sermons from notes, rather than delivering it from memory.

MarginaliaThe B. of Londō enemie to D. Colet.Which because the B. of London vsed then much to do for his age, he tooke it as spoken agaynst hym, & therfore bare him this displeasure. MarginaliaThe archb. of Canter. fauorer of D. Colet.The Archbishop more wysely weying the matter, and beyng well acquaynted with Colet, so tooke his parte agaynst his accusers, that he at that time was ryd out of trouble.

[Back to Top]

Williā Tyndall in his booke aunswering to M. More, addeth moreouer, 

Commentary  *  Close

William Tyndale, An Answere unto Sir Thomas Mores Dialoge, ed. A. M. O'Donnell and Jared Wicks (Washington, DC, 2001), p. 168.

and testifieth that the Byshop of London would haue made the said Colet Deane of Paules, an hereticke for translatyng the Pater noster in Englishe, had not the Byshop of Cant. holpen the Deane.

But yet the malice of Fitziames the B. so ceased not: who beyng thus repulsed by the Archbishop, practised by an other trayne howe to accuse him vnto the kyng. The occasion thus fell. It happened the same tyme, that the kyng was in preparation of warre agaynst Fraunce. Whereupon the Byshop with his coadiutors taking occasion vpon certeine wordes of Colet, wherin he semed to preferre peace before any kynde of warre, were it neuer so iust, accused him therefore in their sermons, and also before the kyng.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaIniquæ pax iustissimo bello præferēda.Furthermore it so befell the same time, that vpon good Friday D. Colet preaching before the kyng, entreated of the victorie of Christ, exhorting all Christians to fight vnder the stāderd of Christ, agaynst the deuill: addyng more ouer what an hard thyng it was to fight vnder Christes

[Back to Top]
banner,
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield