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1237 [1237]

K. Henry. 8. The othe of the Clergie to the king. The mariage of Queene Anne.

promoted. I shall not bee in counsell, treaty, or any acte, in the whiche any thyng shalbe imagined agaynst hym or the Church of Rome, their rightes, states, honours, or powers: and if I know any such to be moued or compassed, I shall resiste it to my power, and as soone as I cā, I shall aduertise him, or such as may geue him knowledge. The rules of the holy fathers, the Decrees, ordinaunces, sentences, dispositions, reseruations, prouisiōs and cōmaundementes Apostolicke, to my power I shall kepe & cause to be kept of other. Heretikes, schismatikes, and rebels to our holy father and his successours, I shal resiste and persecute to my power. I shall come to the Sinode when I am called, except I be letted by a Canonicall impediment. The lightes of þe Apostles I shall visite personally, or by my deputie. I shall not aliene nor sell my possessions, without the Popes councell, so God me helpe and the holy Euangelistes.

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¶ This othe of the Clergie men, whiche they were wont to make to the Byshop of Rome MarginaliaPope Quondam. (nowe Pope quondam) was abolished and made voyde by statute, and a new othe ministred and confirmed for the same, wherin they acknowledged the kyng to be the supreme head vnder Christ in this Churche of England, as by tenour therof may appeare here vnder ensuing.

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¶ The othe of the Clergie to the Kyng.

MarginaliaThe othe of the Clergye to the king.I Iohn Byshop of A. vtterly renounce and clearely forsake all such clauses, wordes, sentēces, and grauntes, whiche I haue or shall haue hereafter of the Popes holines, of and for the Byshopricke of A. that in any wyse hath bene, is, or hereafter may bee hurtfull or preiudiciall to your highnes, your heires, successours, dignitie, priuiledge, or estate royall: and also I do sweare, þt I shall be faithfull & true: and faith & truth I shal beare to you my soueraigne Lord, & to your heires kynges of the same, of life & limme, & earthly worship aboue all creatures, for to liue & die with you & yours against al people, & diligētly I shalbe attendant to all your nedes & busines, after my wit and power, and your councell I shal kepe and hold, knowledgyng my selfe to hold my Byshopricke of you onely, besechyng you of restitution of the temporaltyes of the same, promisyng (as before) that I shalbe faithfull, true, and obedient subiect to your sayd hyghnes, heires, and successours duryng my lyfe, and the seruices and other thinges due to your hyghnes, for the restitution of the temporalties of the same Byshopricke, I shall truly do and obediently perfourme, so God me helpe and all Saintes.

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These othes thus beyng recited and opened to the people, were the occasion that the Pope loste all his interest and iurisdiction here in England, within short while after. Vpon the occasion and reason wherof, the matter fallyng out more and more agaynst the Pope, MarginaliaSyr Thomas More.Syr Thomas More, 

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More resigned the chancellorship on 16 May 1532, citing illness and chest pains.

of whō mention is made before, beyng a great maintainer of the Pope, and a heauy troubler of Christes people, and nowe not lyking well of this othe, by Gods good worke, was enforced to resigne vp his Chaūcelorshyp, and to deliuer vp the great seale of England into the kynges handes. MarginaliaTho. Audley made Lord Chauncellour.After whom succeded Syr Thomas Audley, Keper of þe great seale, a man in eloquence and giftes of tongue no lesse incomparable, then also for his godly disposed minde, and fauorable inclination to Christes Religion, worthy of much commendation.

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MarginaliaThe mariage of Queene Anne.These thynges beyng done in the Parlament, the kyng within short tyme after, proceded to the Mariage of the foresaid Lady Anne Bullen, 

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Famously, Henry and Anne were married twice. A secret ceremony took place on 14 November 1532 (when Anne was found to be pregnant) and a public ceremony on 25 January 1533. [For discussion and speculation over these dates, cf. David Starkey, Six Wives: The Queens of Henry VIII (London, 2004), pp.462-4 and Eric Ives, The Life and Death of Anne Boleyn (Oxford, 2004), pp.170-1].

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mother to our most noble Queene now, 
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Elizabeth I.

who without all cōtrouersie was a speciall comforter & aider of all þe professors of Christes Gospell, as well of the learned, as the vnlearned: her life beyng also directed accordyng to the same, as her weekely almes did manifestlye declare: MarginaliaThe great almes of Queene Anne.Who besides the ordinarye of a C. crownes, and other apparell that she gaue weekely a yeare before she was crowned, both to men and wemen, gaue also wonderfull much priuye almes to wydowes and other poore housholders continuallye, till she was apprehended, and she euer gaue three or foure poūd at a tyme to the poore people to bye them Kyne with all, & sent her Subamner to the townes about where she lay, that þe Parishoners should make a Bill of all the poore housholders in their parishe, and some townes receiued vij. viij. or x. pound to bye kine withall, accordyng as the number of the poore in the townes were. She also maintained many learned mē in Cambridge. Likewise did the Earle of Wilshyre her father, & the Lord Rochford her brother, and by them these men were brought in fauour with the king: of whom some are yet aliue and can testifie þe same, which would to God they were now as great professors of the Gospell of Christ, as then they appeared to be, MarginaliaHeath. Thirleby. L Paget.which were Doct. Heath, & D. Thirleby: with whom was ioyned MarginaliaL. Paget a maintayner of D. Barnes.þe Lord Paget, who at that present was an earnest Protestant, and gaue vnto one Rainold West, Luthers bookes, & other bookes of the Germaines, as Franciscus Lambertus, de Sectis, 
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This refers to a book of François Lambert of Avignon entitled Commentarii in Regulam Minoritarum, et contra universas perditionis Sectas (of 1525).

and at that tyme he read Melancthons Rhetoricke 
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This refers to Philip Melanchthon's treatise of 1521, entitled Institutiones Rhetoricae.

openly in Trinitie hall in Cambridge, and was with his master Gardiner 
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Foxe is making a reference to the fact that Stephen Gardiner had been for quite some time master of Trinity Hall (1525-51, 1553-5).

a maintainer of D. Barnes 
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Robert Barnes and William Paget both held Lutheran ideas, so it is very unlikely that Gardiner maintained Barnes in any serious capacity outside the latter's early academic career.

and all the Protestantes that were then in Cambridge, and holpe many religious persons out of their cowles.

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MarginaliaThe praise of Queene Anne.It hath ben reported vnto vs by diuers credible persons which were about this Queene, & daily acquainted wt her doynges concernyng her liberall & bountifull distributiō to the poore, how her grace caryed euer about her a certein litle purse, out of the which she was wont dayly to scatter abroad some almes to the needy, thinking no day well spent, wherein some man had not fared the better by some benefite at her handes. And this I write by the relation of certeine noble personages whiche were chief & principall of her waityng maydes about her, especially þe Dnches of Richmond by name.

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Also concerning the order of her Ladyes and gentle wemen about her, one that was her silke woman, MarginaliaThe name of this gentlewoman was Maistres Wilkinson.a gentlewoman not now alyue, but of great credite and also of fame for her worthy doynges, did credibly reporte, MarginaliaThe good order of the Court in Queene Annes tyme.that in all her time she neuer saw better order amongest the Ladyes and gentlewomen of the Court, then was in this good Queenes dayes, who kept her maides and such as were about her, so occupyed in sowyng and woorkyng of shyrtes and smockes for the poore, that neither was there sene any idlenes then amongest them, nor any leasure to folowe such passetimes as daily are sene now a dayes to raigne in Princes Courtes.

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MarginaliaThe kyng diuorced from Lady Catherine and from the Pope, both at one tyme.Thus the kyng being diuorced frō the Lady Dowager his brothers wife, maried this gracious Lady, makyng a prosperous and happy chaūge for vs, beyng diuorced from the foresayd Princesse and also from the Pope both at one tyme. Notwithstandyng as good and godly purposes are neuer without some incommoditie or trouble folowyng, so it happened in this deuorcement, that the sayd Princesse procuryng from Rome the Popes curse, caused both the kyng and þe realme to be interdited: 

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An interdict is the suspension of all church activities. Foxe may be exaggerating here. England had been placed under interdict in the reign of John (1208), but Clement only threatened this action (which proved moot in due course anyway). [See, T C Price Zimmermann, 'A Note on Clement VII and the Divorce of Henry VIII', in The English Historical Review 82:324 (July 1967), pp.548-52].

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wherof more is here after to be spoken.

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Marginalia1534.
Queene Anne crowned.
In the meane tyme Queene Anne, shortly after her Mariage, beyng great with child, the next yeare folowyng, whiche was. 1534. after the first deuorcement publickely proclaymed, was crowned with 

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Anne was crowned queen on 1 June 1533.

highe solempnitie at Westminster: MarginaliaQueene Elizabeth borne.and not long after her Coronation, the vij. day of September she was brought a bead and deliuered of a faire Lady, for whose good deliueraunce Te Deum was song in all places, and great preparation made for the Christenyng. 
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The account is basically taken out of Hall's Chronicle [for which, see Edward Hall, The Union of the Two Noble and Illustre Families of Lancastre & York, 2 vols., ed. by H Ellis (London, 1809), ii, p.805].

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The Maior and his brethren with xl. of the chief Citezins were cōmaunded to be present with all the Nobles and Gentlemen. The kynges Pallace and all the walles betwene that and the Friers, was hāged with Arras, and the Friers Churche. Also the Fonte was of siluer, and stoode in the middest of the Churche three steppes high, which was couered with a fyne cloth, and diuers Gentlemen with approns and towells about their neckes, gaue attendaūce about it. Ouer þe Fonte hong a faire Canapye of crimison satten fringed with

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golde.
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