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1258 [1258]

K. Henry. 8. The Oration of Syr Raffe Sadler to the king of Scottes.

dealing in þt parte, to winne your Vncles most sincere and kinde harte, to the encrease of your amitie and alliance: Whiche as to you shalbe most honorable, so shall it be no lesse profitable vnto hym.

MarginaliaThe second poynt.And thus to conclude with the first parte of my narration concernyng the sclaunderous and diffamatory libelles, lest I shoulde seeme with prolixitie of matter more then needes, to abuse your graces silence: I will now descende to the other poynt of that whiche I haue to vtter vnto your grace, as touching the Popes Nuncio or messenger 

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A papal nuncio is far more than merely a messenger; he is the permanent diplomatic representative of the papacy in another state. Foxe is referring to David Beaton, a skilled diplomat, who was commendator of Arbroath (from 1524), bishop of Mirepoix (in France from 1537) and cardinal-priest of St Stephen in the Caelian Hill (from 1538).

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. Of whose late ariuall, the kynges maiestie your Vncle hauyng partlye intelligence, but not certainly knowyng the speciall causes of his commyng from Rome, and yet fearing by the common brute and talke of your subiectes what hys arant should be: that is, to practise some annoyance by his pretended censures agaynst the kynges maiestie your Vncle: hee therefore premonishyng your grace before as fearing the worst, most iustly maketh his complaint therof vnto your grace his nephew, requiryng you, that forasmuch as the forsayd brutes and reports are sclaūdrous to his maiestye: and seyng that neyther the Emperour, nor the French King, nor any other Princes haue consented therto or vnderstoode therof, the kyngs maiestie therfore your Vncle willyng to stoppe those brutes and talkes, desireth and most hartely prayeth youre grace at hys instant request to vouchsafe to consider and way: MarginaliaSupremacie of Princes.First, the supremacy of Princes by the holy Scripture graunted vnto hym and other Princes in earth vnder Christ, vpon theyr Churches.

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Secondly, to way what the Gospel and Gods word calleth a Churche.

Also, what superstitions, idolatries, and blinde abuses haue crept into all realmes, to the highe displeasure of almightye God, by reason therof.

Fourthly, what is to bee vnderstanded by the true censure or excommunication of the Churche, & how no such can be in the power of the Byshop of Rome, or of any other mā, against his maiestie or any other Prince, hauing so iust grounde to auoyde from the roote & to abolishe that execrable authoritie, whiche the Byshop of Rome hath vsurped and doth vsurpe vpō all Princes, to their great detriment and dammage.

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As touching the consideration of which iiij. pointes, although the kyngs maiestie, your Vncle doubteth not your grace to be furnished and prouided with sufficient knowledge, rightly to discerne and to iudge vppon the same, yet if it shall so please your grace further to know your Vncles mind touchyng the sayd poyntes, I assure your highnes in the behalfe of your foresayd Vncle hys maiestie, that hee will not sticke to send vnto you such learned, wise, and discrete men, as shall amply enforme you thereof, and of such other thynges as your grace hauyng once a smacke thereof, shall thinke most worthye for a Prince to knowe.

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His request therfore to your highnes is, that you wil consider of what moment and importance it shalbe vnto your grace (hauing þe Scottes your subiectes so euill instructed in the premisses) for you to assent and agree to any such censure, and so by such example to geue such an vpper hand ouer your selfe and other Princes, to that vsurper of Rome, as is very lyke hereafter to happen in other places lykewise of Christendome, where soeuer the true declaration of the truth and worde of God shall haue free course, to scourge them, vnlesse they will adore, worshyp, and kisse the feete of that corrupte holynes, whiche desireth nothyng els but pride and MarginaliaRomes yokes.the vniuersall thrall of Christendome vnder Romes yokes.

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But because the censures of that Nuntio be not yet opened, but lye secrete and vncertaine vnder mutteryng, I shall cease farther to procede therin, till farther occasion shall minister to me more certaine matter for to say and to iudge. In the meane tyme, for somuch as it is moste certainlye come to the intelligence of the MarginaliaThe Abbot of Arbroth chosen Cardinall of Scotland.kynges maiestie, that the Abbot of Arbroth 

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Beaton's title was Commendator (an office with political connotations) not abbot (with its more religious connotations). Arbroath was a house of the Order of Tiron (a Benedictine order), sometimes called the 'Grey monks', located in Angus.

should bee chosen of late and elected to be a Cardinall in this your realme of Scotland, his maiestie therefore for the good loue and harty will hee beareth vnto your grace, as the Vncle is bounde vnto the Nephew, knowing that you as yet perceiue not so well the hypocrisye and deceitful guile and malice of the Romaines and theyr practises, as he hymselfe doth by hys long experience: coulde not but hearing therof, aduertyse your grace, that his aduise is, you should not suffer any of youre subiectes to take vpon hym that redde hatte of pride: whereby he shall incontinētly, the same beyng receaued (vnlesse he be of a cōtrary nature to any man that euer was yet of that sorte) not onely be, in maner, discharged of hys obedience, and become the Bishop of Romes true liege man, but also shall presume of hys Cardinalshyp to bee your fellowe, and to haue the rule as well as you.

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MarginaliaInconueniences that commeth by Cardinalls.Then shall the Byshop of Rome crepe into your owne very bosome, know all your secrets, and at last, vnlesse you will be yoked & serue theyr pleasure in all poyntes, your grace is like to smarte for it. The thinge perchāce in the beginning shall seeme to your grace very honorable and pleasaunt: but wysdome woulde to beware of the taile which is very blacke and bitter.

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Hys Maiesties Father, and Graundfather to your grace, had a Cardinal, wherof he was wery, and neuer admitted other after hys deceasse, knowyng the importable pride of them. In like maner also hys highnes by the experience of one, hath vtterly determined to auoid all the sorte: So well hys grace hath knowne and experienced their mischiefe, yoke, & thraldome, that therby is layd vpon Princes. By reason whereof, as hys hyghnes is the more able by his owne experience to informe your grace: so of good will and mere propensitye of hart, caused partly by nature and kynne, partly by coniunction and vicinitie of dominions adioynyng so neare together, he is no lesse ready to forewarne your grace before, wishyng that God will so worke in your princely hart & noble stomacke, that hys maiesties monition and frendly warning, as it procedeth from a syncere affection and tender care of his part, vnto his Nephew: so it may preuaile & take place in your mynde, that your grace wysely weying with your self, what supreme ryght Princes haue and ought to haue vpō their Churches and lands where they gouerne, and what litle cause the Bishop of Rome hath therfore to procede by vniust censures against them, your grace may therin not only stand to the iust defence of your deare Vncle, but also may endeuour to followe his steppes therin, & to take his consaile, which he doubteth not, but shall redound not only to your graces honour, to the benefite, weale and profyte of your realme and subiectes, but especially to the glory of almightye God, and aduauncement of hys true religion.

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And thus haue I expoūded to your grace the summe of my arant and message frō the kynges maiestye your Vncle: who as he would be glad to be aduertised by aunswere, of your graces purpose, mynde, & intention in this behalfe, so for my parte, according to my charge and dutie, I shall be prest & readye with all diligence, to giue mine attendāce vpon your pleasure for the same, accordyngly.

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¶ The summe and effect of the kinges message sent to the Frenche kyng in defense of hys procedynges.

MarginaliaThe kynges message to the French kyng.THe kyng consideryng the present state of his Mariage whiche was not yet well digested nor accepted in þe Courtes of other Princes: and also hauyng intelligēce of þe straite amitie intended by the Mariages betwene the Emperour and the Frenche kyng, and also of the Popes inclination to pleasure the Emperour, and further vnderstandyng of the order and meanyng of the Frenche kynges Coūsaile, not greatly fauoring his purposes, sent therefore vnto Fraunce, for his Am-

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