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1260 [1260]

K. Henry. 8. The kinges message to the French king for his defence.

perours dominions, and feede of hym (among which was also the sayd Capasuccha) gaue their voyces as the Pope sayd, that Doct. Kerne should not be heard sine mandato regiæ maiestatis. Whereunto when Doct. Kerne replyed saying: what soeuer they decreed or sayd there was no law to maintaine and beare it: it was sayd agayne by Cardinall Anconytate, 

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This may refer to Pietro Accolti, Cardinal of Ancona, who had been very much involved in the dispute (as a Catherine partisan) prior to his death in 1532.

that the Pope might iudge after his conscience. MarginaliaThe Pope would haue the king to appeare by proxie, at Rome.And vpon this resolutiō, they determined there to procede in the principall cause, vnlesse the kyng would send a proxie, intēding by this iniury & wronge, to enforce his highnes, to the exhibition of a proxie there, to hys highnes high preiudice, to the pernicious example of the lyke to bee done to other Princes, and also to þe derogation of the liberties and prerogatiues of hys gracious realme. Vnto the obseruation wherof his highnes is bound by his othe, and also by the same othe bounde to recouer and restore such liberties and priuileges, as by any of his predecessors hath bene lost, diminished, or decayed in tyme past.

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These, with other lyke iniuries and wronges of the Pope done to the kyng, the foresayd Ambassadour M. Foxe, accordyng as he had in charge and commission, did declare, open, and shew vnto the Frenche kyng, to the intent to solicite the sayd kyng, to do by hys mediation, for the remediyng and redressyng of those foresayd iniuries and wrongfull dealynges of the Pope in this behalfe.

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MarginaliaThe third part or purpose of this message.Furthermore, for the thyrd purpose touchyng the Chauncellour of Fraunce, for as much as hee was one of the chief personages, whom the Frenche kyng most trusted in hys great affaires (by whose aduyse all matters of learning were then conduced and trayned) the kyng thought it not vnprofitable, by all wayes & meanes to winne and allure his frenship and amitie also, vnto his deuotion, either that by hys meanes and dexteritie the kinges purposes might be aduaunced the better: or at least for a ne noceat: that is, to mitigate and diminish such fauour as he by the admirall 

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Gaspard I de Coligny.

or otherwise, was moued to shewe to the Imperialles. For the whiche cause the kyng committyng in charge to his Ambassadour aforesayd, willed and instructed hym, how and what to do, and after what maner to attemperate hym self to all occasions and tymes of oportunitie: as first to deliuer to him from the kyng, hys letters of credence, and withall to declare and extend the kynges most affectuous commendations, with the hartie good will, and sincere affection whiche hys hyghnes bare to the said Cardinall Chauncellour of Fraunce, with no lesse desire also most gladly to do that thing, which might be to his cōmoditie & benefite, accordyng as the manifold pleasures, gratuities, & kyndnes done on hys part for the kinges highnes, dyd worthely deserue. Thē after such wordes of mollificatiō, to enter into further communciation with hym, in such sort, as myght best serue hys honor.

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MarginaliaThe vainglory and auarice of the Cardinall.And for asmuch as the Cardinall was then noted much to bee moued with the affections of vayne glory, and couetous, therfore amongst other communicatiō, it was diuised to inferre mention of the Papalitie, noting what wayes and meanes might be vsed to attayne vnto that dignitie. MarginaliaThe fashiō of princes courtes to be noted.Wherein if the kynges hyghnes could stand hym to any stede, as he thought the person of the sayd Chauncellour most mete for the same: so he would not fayle to moue and to procure it to the best furtheraunce of hys aduauncement. And finallye to declare howe desirous the kynges hyghnes was to retayne and make sure vnto hym, the amitie and frendshyppe of the sayd Chauncellour, and that hys highnes deuising by what meanes & waies he might, doe the same (albeit hys grace knewe well, that the fayth and sinceritie of the said Chauncellour towardes his master was such, as no gifte, pencion, or other offer could aduaunce or encrease that good will, which for his masters sake, he would employe in the kynges hyghnes affaires) thought that for declaration of hys hartye good will towardes the sayd Chauncellour, it were conuenient to offer vnto hym, some yearelye remembraunce. &c.

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This was the summe and effect of the message of the kyng sent vnto the Frenche kyng, and to other of hys coūsaile, by hys Ambassadour M. Edward Foxe, which was especially to signifie and make manifest vnto the sayd Frenche kyng the vniust dealynges and preiudiciall procedynges of the Pope, in callyng vp the kyng of England to appeare at Rome by proxie, whiche was derogatorie to the kynges dignitie and crowne, and also preiudicall both to generall Councels of the primitiue tyme, and to the auncient lawes and statutes of this realme (as is afore declared) and no lesse hurtfull for exāple, to all other princes and kinges likewise. &c

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MarginaliaSte. Gardiner Ambassadour to the French kyng.This message so done, shortlye after was sent to the sayd Frenche kyng, Stephen Gardiner Byshop of Wynchester, with the kynges aunswere and message againe on this maner: that for somuch as the saying of the Frenche kyng to the Ambassadours was this: MarginaliaThe French kinges saying agaynst the kinges succession.that notwithstandyng all the kynges Realme should agree and condescende neuer so much to that right and title, which þe successiō procreated of this his lawfull matrimonie hath in this his realme: yet when outward parties shall conceaue any other or contrary opinion therof, great trouble and vexation might ensue. &c. Wherunto the kyng made aunswere agayne, declaryng, MarginaliaThe kynges aūswere to the French king.that hee could not but greatly meruaile, that the kyng hys brother beyng so wyse a Prince, and therto so well experte and learned in Chronicles and histories, not onely of his owne realme, but also of all others, or any of his coūsaile being mē of such experiēce as they were taken to be, would thinke that þe opinion & consent of other outward realmes was so hyghly to bee considered and regarded of any prince or kyng, in stablishyng or in executiō of thyngs which might be lawfully done, & which touched þe preseruation of þe rightes, preeminences, dignitie & state of his realme, and did also notably conferre vnto the singular benefite and tranquilitie of the same, so as the woordes both of the sayd kyng hys brother, & of the great Master dyd pretend. MarginaliaKynges in the ryght of their realmes are not bound to the agreement of outwarde realmes.Who furthermore were not ignoraunt thē selues þt many things haue bene by hys noble progenitours kings of Fraūce attempted and done, as well in cases 

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This vague reference could refer to any number of problems, going back to Philip I and his many tangles with Pope Gregory VII.

of matrimony, as otherwise, whiche in some parte in the opinion of the Popes of Rome then beyng, and in some parte in the opiniō of diuers other outward princes, states, seigniories, & common people haue bene thought not perfectly good, nor yet much acceptable vnto thē: and yet that notwithstādyng, his sayd progenitours knowyng them selues þe prosecuting of those causes to be beneficiall to them and to the realme, haue not therfore desisted from their sayd purposes, but diligētly employing their own strength and powers with the succours of their frēdes, haue finally achiued their sayd enterprises, without requiryng or greatly regardyng the opinion or agrement therunto, of outward princes.

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MarginaliaThe ouerture of the Chauncellour of Fraunce, to the kyng to take indifferent iudges by the Popes authoritie.Agayne, where as the Chauncellour of Fraunce made this ouerture to the sayd Bishop of Winchester, whether the kyng would be content to haue indifferēt Iudges to be appoynted by the authoritie of the Pope to determine his cause, with a commission decretall from the same, declaryng quid iuris. &c. The kyng by his Ambassadour therunto aunswering, declared, MarginaliaThe kynges aunswere to the ouerture.that the Pope hauyng done vnto him so notable and euidēt iniuries, as he had done, it were hys office and duetie, now to labour hym self to ende this matter, and to study how to make due satisfactiō to God and his iustice, whiche he hath tam indignis modis, offended and violated, and to deliuer him selfe out of the daunger, and the perpetuall infamie of the world, whiche he hath incurred by reasō of these his most vngodly doings, and not to looke that the kyng should make any request or

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