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1261 [1261]

K. Henry. 8. The kinges aunswere in hys defence agaynst the Pope.

sute vnto him therfore, or recompense for the same. &c.

Furthermore where as the Pope, at the request of the French kyng, had in open Consistorie proroged execution of his censures and excommunciation agaynst the kyng, vnto þe first day of Nouemb. and word therof was sent to þe kyng by his Ambassadours, frō the great Master of Fraunce, that the kyng might haue the sayd prorogation made autentikely in writyng, if he would: the kyng aunsweryng therunto, thought it not vnprofitable, þt his Ambassadours resient in Fraūce, should receaue vnto their hādes, the possession of the sayd new prorogation conceaued and written in autentike forme and maner, accordyng to the order of the lawes.

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MarginaliaThe kyng requested by the French kyng to relent to the Pope.After this agayne came other letters to the kyng frō Fraunce, namely frō the great Master of Fraunce tendyng to this end, that if the kyng woulde do nothyng for the Pope (meanyng by the reuocation of such actes of Parlament, as were made in þe realme of England to the Popes preiudice) it were no reason, neither should it be possible for the French kyng to induce the Pope to any gratuitie or pleasure for the kyng in hys affaires.

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MarginaliaThe kinges aunswere to the French kings request.Whereunto the kyng aunsweryng agayne, sendeth worde to the Frenche kyng, trustyng & hopyng well of the perfect frendshyp of the Frenche kyng his good brother, þt he will neuer suffer any such persuasion to entre into his brest, what so euer the great Master or any other shall say to the contrary therof, nor that he will require any thyng more of hym to do for the Pope, Chaūcellour, or other, then his couusayle hath already deuised to be done in this behalfe: especially consideryng the wordes of the said French kyngs promise made before, as well to the Duke of Northfolke, 

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Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, was in France to bring Anne Boleyn to Henry VIII's court.

as to the other Ambassadours, promising his frēdshyp to the kyng simplye without requiryng hym to reuocate or infrynge any such acte or constitution made by the realme & Parlament, to þe contrary: Persuadyng moreouer and laying before the eyes, as well of the Pope, as of the French kyng, how much it should redoūd to the popes dishonour and infamie, and to the sclaunder also of hys cause, if he should be sene so to pact and couenaūt with the kyng vppon such conditions, for the admininistratiō of that thyng, MarginaliaThe Pope seeketh not for iustice, but hys own lucre and commoditie.whiche he in hys owne conscience hath reputed and iudged to bee moste rightfull and agreable to iustice and equitie, and ought of his office & duetie to do in this matter simpliciter & gratis, and without all worldly respectes, either for the aduauncement of hys priuate lucre and commoditie, or for the preseruation of hys pretensed power and aucthoritie. For surely it is not to be doubted, but that the Pope beyng minded and determined to geue sentēce for the inualiditie and nullitie of the kyngs first pretensed matrimonie, hath conceaued and established in hys owne conscience a firme and certaine opinion & persuasion, that he ought of iustice and equitie so to do. MarginaliaThe Pope selleth iustice.Then to see the Pope to haue this opinion in deede, and yet refuse this to do for the kyng, vnlesse he shall be content for his benefite and pleasure, cedere iuri suo, & to do some thynges preiudiciall vnto his subiectes contrary to hys honour: it is easie to be foresene, what the world & the posteritie shall iudge de tam turpi nundinatione iusticiæ, et illius tam fæda & sordida lucri & honoris ambitione. And as for the kynges part, if hee shall not atteine nowe iustice at the mediation of his good brother, MarginaliaThe Pope doth agaynst hys owne conscience.knowyng the Pope to bee of this disposition and determination in his harte, to satisfie all hys desires beyng moued therunto by iustice, and that the let therof is no default of iustice in the cause, but onely for that the kyng would not condescend to his request: it is to the kyng matter sufficient enough for discharge of hys conscience to God and to the world, although he neuer did execute in deede hys sayd determination. For sith his corrupt affection is the onely impediment therof, what nede either the kyng to require hym any further to do in the cause, or els his subiectes to doubt any further in the iustnes of the same.

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MarginaliaThe Pope forgetteth hys old benefactours & frendek.Albeit if respectes to benefites and merites done towardes the Pope and the sea of Rome, shoulde be regarded in þe attainyng of iustice in a cause of so hygh consequencie as this is, reason would that if it would please the Pope to consider the former kyndnes of the kyng shewed vnto hym in tymes past (wherof he is very loth to enter the rehearsall, ne videatur velle exprobrare quæ de alijs fecerit benè) hee should not now require of hym any new benefite or gratuitie to be shewed vnto hym, but rather study to recompence him for the old graces, merites, pleasures & benefites before receaued. MarginaliaThe benefites of the kyng vpon the Pope, when he was taken by the Duke of Borbone.For surely he thinketh, that the Pope 

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This refers back to the king's offer of military assistance while the pope had been the virtual prisoner of the emperor after the sacking of Rome in 1527.

can not forget how that for the conseruation of his person, his estate and dignitie, the kyng hath not heretofore spared for any respect, in vsing the office of a most perfect and stedfast frende, to relinquish the long continued good will established betwene hym and the Emperour, and to declare openly to all the world, that for the Popes sake, and in default of hys deliueraunce, hee would become enemy to the sayd Emperour, and to make agaynst hym actuall warre.

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Beside thys, the kyng hath not fayled hym with right large and ample subuentions of money, for the better supportyng of hys charges, agaynst the enterprises of the sayd Emperour combyndyng and knyttyng hym selfe with the Frenche kyng, to procure the aduauncement of the sayd Frenche kynges armye into Italie, to the charges wherof, the kyng dyd beare litle lesse then þe one halfe: MarginaliaOf thys read before pag. 1123.Besides notable losses susteined aswell in hys customes, subsidies, and other dueties, as also to the no litle hinderaunce and damage of his subiectes & marchauntes occasioned by discontinuance of the trafficke and entercourse heretofore vsed with the Emperours subiectes. In doyng of all whiche thyngs, the king hath not bene thus respectiue, as the Pope now sheweth him selfe towardes him, but lyke a perfect frend hath ben alwayes cōtented franckly, liberally, and openly to expone all his study, labour, trauaile, treasure, puisance, realme and subiectes for þe Popes ayde and the maintenance of the state and dignitie of the Churche, and sea of Rome. Which thinges although he doth not here rehearse animo exprobrandi, yet he doubteth not, but the same wayed in the ballance of any indifferent mās iudgemēt, shalbe thought to be of that waight and valure, as that hee hath iustly deserued to haue some mutual correspōdencie of kyndnes to be shewed vnto him at the Popes handes: MarginaliaAll is loste that is done for a churle.especially in the ministratiō of iustice, and in so reasonable and iust cause as this is, and not thus to haue his most rightfull petition reiected and denyed because he will not followe his desire and appetite in reuocatyng of such actes as bee here made and passed for the weale & commoditie of his realme and subiectes.

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¶ Thus haue ye heard how instantly the kyng had laboured by the meanes of the Frenche kyng, to the Pope beyng then in Fraunce, for right and iustice to be done, for the dissolution and nullitie of his first pretensed matrimonie with his brothers wife. Whiche when it could not be attayned at the Popes hands, vnles the kyng would recompēse and requite the same by reuocatyng of such statutes as were made and enacted here in the hygh Courte of Parlament, for the suretie of succession and stablishement of the realme: what the kyng therunto aunswered agayne, ye heard, declaryng that to be a farre vnequall recompence and satisfaction for a thyng, whiche ought of right and iustice to be ministred vnto hym, that a kyng therfore should reuocate and vndoe þe Actes & statutes passed by a whole Realme, contrary to hys owne honour, and weale of hys subiectes. &c.

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Where is moreouer to bee vnderstanded, how that the Pope with all his Papistes, & the Frenche kyng also, & peraduenture Stephen Gardiner too, the kynges owne Ambassadour, had euer a speciall eye to disproue

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