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1265 [1265]

K. Henry. 8. The storye and life of William Tyndall, Martyr.

a happy man. And so commyng to Syr Henry Gilford the kynges Controler, and bryngyng with hym MarginaliaAn oration of Isocrates translated out of Greke into English by W. Tyndall.an Oration of Isocrates, which he had then translated out of Greke into English, he desired him to speake to þe sayd B. of London for him. Which he also did 

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This account of Tyndale seeking the patronage of Tunstall and being comes from Tyndale's preface to the Penteteuch: see William Tyndale, Doctrinal Treartises and Introductions to Different Portions of Holy Scriptures, ed. Henry Walter, Parker Society (Cambridge, 1848), pp. 395-6.

, & willed him moreouer to write an Epistle to the Byshop, and to go him selfe with hym. MarginaliaTyndall sueth to bishop Tonstall to be his Chaplaine.Which he did likewise, and deliuered his Epistle to a seruaunt of hys named Williā Hebilthwaite, a man of hys old acquaintaunce. But God who secretly disposeth the course of thynges saw that was not best for Tyndals purpose nor for the profite of his Churche, and therfore gaue him to finde litle fauor in the Bishops sight. MarginaliaTonstall refuseth Maister Tyndall.The aūswere of whom was this, that his house was full: hee had mo then he could well finde, and aduised hym to seeke in London abroade, where he sayd hee could lacke no seruice. &c. and so remayned he in London the space almost of a yeare, beholdyng and markyng with hym selfe the course of the world, & especially the demeanour of þe preachers, how they boasted thē selues & set vp their authoritie & kingdome: beholdyng also the pompe of the Prelates, with other thynges moe whiche greatly mislyked him: In so much þt he vnderstode, not only there to be no rowme in the Byshops house for hym to translate the new Testament: but also that there was no place to do it in all Englād. And therfore findyng no place for his purpose within the realme, & hauyng some ayde and prouision, by Gods prouidēce ministred vnto him by Humphrey Mummoth aboue recited 
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See 1570, p. 1134; 1576, p. 970 and 1583, p. 957.

, as you may see before pag. 1133. and certeine other good men, MarginaliaTyndall departeth into Germany.he tooke his leaue of the realme and departed into Germanie. Where the good man beyng inflamed with a tender care and zeale of hys countrey, refused no trauell nor diligence how by all meanes possible, to reduce his brethren and coūtreymen of England to the same tast and vnderstanding of Gods holy worde and veritie, whiche the Lord had endued hym withall.

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MarginaliaThe causes mouing Tyndall to translate the scripture into the English tonge.Wherupon he consydering in his mynde, & partely also conferring with Ioh. Frith, thought wt him self no way more to conduce therunto, then if the Scripture were turned into þe vulgar speach, that the poore people might also reade and see the simple playn word of God. For fyrst he wisely casting in hys mynde, perceyued by experience, how that it was not possible to stablishe the lay people in any truth, except the Scripture were so playnly layed before theyr eyes in theyr mother tonge, that they might see the processe, order, and meanyng of the texte: For elles what so euer truth should be taught thē, these enemyes of the truth would quench it agayn, eyther with apparant reasons of sophistrye, and traditions of theyr owne makyng, founded without all grounde of scripture: either els iuggling with the texte, expoundyng it in suche a sense, as impossible it were to gather of the texte, if the right processe, order, and meanyng therof were seene.

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MarginaliaHyding of Scripture the cause of mischiefe.Agayne, right well he perceyued and considered this onely or most chiefly to be the cause of all myschief in the Church, that the Scriptures of God were hydden from the peoples eyes: For so longe the abominable doynges and Idolatryes mayntayned by the Pharisaicall Clergie, could not be espyed, and therfore all theyr labour was with myght & mayne to kepe it downe, so that eyther it should not be read at all, or if it were, they would darken the right sense with the myste of theyre sophistry, and so entāgle thē which rebuked or despised their abominations, with argumentes of philosophy, & with worldly similitudes, and apparant reasons of naturall wysedom: and with wresting the Scripture vnto theyr owne purpose, contrary vnto the processe, order, and meanyng of the texte, would so delude them in descantyng vppon it with allegories, and amaze them, expounding it in many senses layed before the vnlearned laye people, that thoughe thou felte in thy harte, and were sure that all were false that they said, yet couldest not thou solue theyr subtell rydels.

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For these and such other considerations, thys good man was moued (and no doubt styrred vp of God) to translate the Scripture in to hys mother tonge, for the publycke vtilitye and profyte of the symple vulgar people of hys countrey: MarginaliaThe new Testamēt, and the v. bookes of Moyses translated with Tyndals prologues.fyrst, settyng in hand with the new Testament, which hee fyrst translated about the yeare of our Lord. 1527. After that, he tooke in hand to translate the olde Testament, finishyng the fyue bookes of Moyses, with sundry most learned and godly prologues prefixed before euery one, most worthy to be reade and read agayn of all good Christians: as the like also he dyd vpon the new Testament.

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He wrote also diuers other workes vnder sundrye titles, among the which is that most worthy monument of hys intituled, the obediēce of a Christiā man, wherin with singular dexteritye he instructeth all men in the office and dutye of Christian obedience: with dyuers other treatises: as of the wicked Mammon: the practise of Prelates, with expositions vpon certayne partes of the Scripture, and other bookes also aunswering to Syr Thomas More and other aduersaires of þe truth, no lesse delectable, then also most fruitfull to be reade, which partely yet beyng vnknowen to many, partely also beyng almost abolished and worne out by tyme, MarginaliaThe bokes of Tyndall promised to be printed altogether.the prynter herof 

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I.e., John Day, the printer of the Acts and Monuments.

intendeth (good reader) for conseruyng & restoryng such singular treasures, shortly (God willing) to collecte and set forth in print the same in one generall volume all and whole together, as also the workes of Ioh. Frith, Barnes, and other, as shall seeme most speciall and profytable for thy reading. 
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This is a reference to The whole workes of W. Tyndale, John Frith and Doct. Barnes, ed. John Foxe, STC 24436, which was printed by John Day in 1572.

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These bookes of William Tyndall beyng compiled, published and sent ouer into Englād, it can not be spoken what a doore of light they opened to the eyes of the whole Englishe nation, whiche before were many yeares shutte vp in darkenes.

MarginaliaTyndall went into Saxonie.At his first departing out of the realme, hee tooke hys iourney into the further partes of Germany, as into Saxonie, where he had conference with Luther and other learned men in those quarters. MarginaliaTyndall came to Antwerpe.Where, after that he had continued a certeine season, he came downe frō thence into the netherlandes and had hys most abydyng in the towne of Antwerpe 

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There is actually no evidence that Tyndale visited Saxony. He did, however, visit Cologne in 1525, where his translation of the New Testament was partially printed, before the printing house was raided by the authorities. Tyndale then journeyed to the safe Lutheran city of Worms where his New Testament was printed in 1526. Exactly when Tyndale reached Antwerp is unknown, but it was in the years 1526-8.

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, vntill the tyme of hys apprehension: whereof more shalbe sayd God willyng hereafter.

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Amongest hys other bookes which he compiled, one worke hee made also for the declaration of the Sacrament (as it was then called) of the aultar: the which he kept by hym, consideryng how the people were not as yet fully persuaded in other matters tendyng to supersticious ceremonies and grosse idolatrie. Wherfore he thought as yet tyme was not come, to put forth that worke, but rather þt it should hinder þe people frō other instructions, supposing that it would seeme to them odious to heare any such thyng spoken or set forth at that tyme, soundyng agaynst their great Goddesse Diana: that is, agaynst their Masse, beyng had euery where in great estimatiō, as was the Goddesse Diana amongest the Ephesians whō they thought to come frō heauen. 

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This is a reference to Acts 19: 24-41.

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MarginaliaTyndall bearing with time.Wherefore M. Tyndall beyng a man both prudent in hys doynges, and no lesse zelous in the settyng forth of Gods holy truth, after such sorte as it might take most effect with the people, did forbeare the puttyng forth of that worke, not doubtyng but by Gods mercyfull grace, a tyme should come, to haue that abomination openly declared, as it is at this present day 

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This a reference to William Tyndale, A brief declaration of the sacraments, STC 24445, which was not published until around 1548. In this work, Tyndale denied the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist, arguing instead that it is the inner faith of the communicants that makes the Lord's Supper a Sacrament. This view was not only objectionable to Catholics, but also to Henry VIII and (at this time) Thomas Cranmer.

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: the Lord almighty be alwayes praysed therfore. Amen.

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These godly bookes of Tyndall, and specially þe new Testament of hys translation, after that they began to come into mens handes, and to spread abroad, as they wrought great and singulare profite to the godly: MarginaliaDarkenes hateth lyght.so the vngodly enuying & disdaynyng that the people should be any thyng wyser then they, and agayne fearyng lest by the shynyng beames of truth, their false hypocrysye and workes of darknes should be discerned: began to styrre with no small adoe, like as at the birth of Christ,

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