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1289 [1289]

K. Hen. 8. Iniunctions by the kinges authoritie. Longlands Sermon.

rice of such as felt profit by the same.

MarginaliaThe worde of God to be preached without stop or interruptiō.Itē, if ye do or shall know any within your parishe, or els where, that is a letter of þe word of God to be read in Englishe, or syncerely preached, or of the executiō of these Iniunctions, or a fautor of the Bishop of Romes pretensed power, now by the lawes of this realme iustly reiected and extirped: ye shall detecte the same to the kynges highnes, or hys honorable Coūsell, or to hys Vicegerent aforesaid, or to the iustice of peace next adioyning.

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MarginaliaRegester boke for euery parish.Item, that you and euery Person, Vicar, or Curate, within thys dioces, shall for euerye Churche, keepe one booke of register, wherin ye shall wryte the day and yere of euery wedding, christening, and burying made within your parish for your tyme, and so for euery mā succeding you likewise, and also therein set euerye persones name that shall be so wedded, christened or buried, and for the safe keeping of the same booke, the parish shall be bound to prouide of their common charges, one sure coffer with ij. locks and keies, wherof the one to remayne with you, and the other with the Wardens of euery suche Parishe, wherein the sayed booke shall be layd vp: Which booke ye shall euery Sonday take forth, and in the presence of the sayd Wardens or one of them, write and record in the same, all the weddinges, christeninges, and buryinges, made the whole weke before, and that done, to laye vp the sayd booke in the sayed coffer as afore, and for euerye tyme the same shall be omitted, the partye that shallbe in the faute therof, shall forfayt to the sayed Church. iij. shillinges. iiij. pence to be emploid on the reparation of the same Church.

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Item, that ye shall once euerye quarter of a yere, read these and the other former Iniunctions geuen vnto you by authoritye of the kinges highnes, openly and deliberately before al your parishoners, to the entent that both you maye be the better admonished of your duety, & your sayd parishoners the more incited to ensue the same for theyr part.

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MarginaliaTithes to be payed.Item, for as much as by a law established, euery mā is bound to pay his tithes, no man shal by colour of duety omitted by theyr Curates, deteine their tithes, and so redubbe one wrong with an other, or be his own iudge, but shall truely pay the same as hath bene accustomed, to theyr Persons and Curates, without any restraint or diminution: and such lacke and default as they can iustlye fynde in their persons and Curates, to call for reformation thereof, at their Ordinaryes and other superiours handes, who vpon cōplaint and due proufe therof, shall reforme the same accordingly.

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Diarmaid MacCulloch observes that this provision is a late insertion into the text of these injunctions and included to justify the forthcoming destruction of Thomas Becket's shrine at Canterbury (Diarmaid MacCulloch, Thomas Cranmer (New Haven, 1996), pp. 226-7).

, that no Person shall from henceforth, alter or chaunge the order and manner of anye fastyng daye that is commaunded and indycted by the Church, nor of prayer, nor of diuine seruice, otherwise then is specifyed in the said Iniunctions, vntil such tyme as the same shallbe so ordered and transposed by the kinges hyghnes autority, the Euens of such Sainctes whose holy dayes be abrogated, only excepted, whiche shall be declared henceforth to be no fasting dayes, MarginaliaBeckets day abrogate.excepte also the commemoration of T. Becket sometyme Archbishop of Canterbury, which shalbe cleane omitted, and in stead therof the ferial seruice vsed.

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MarginaliaKnoling of Aues forbidden.Item, that the knolinge of the Aues after seruice, and certeine other times, whiche hath bene brought in and begon by the pretence of the Bishop of Romes pardon, henceforth be left and omitted, lest the people do hereafter trust to haue perdō for the saying of their Aues betwene the sayd knoling, as they haue done in tymes past.

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MarginaliaSuffrages of Saintes reiected.Item, where in tymes past men haue vsed in diuers places in their Processions, to sing Ora pro nobis, to soo many Saintes, that they had no tyme to singe the good suffrages followinge: as Parce nobis Domine, and Libera nos Domine, it must be taughte and preached, that better it were to omitte Ora pro nobis, and to sing the other suffrages being moste necessarye and effectuall. All whiche and singuler Iniunctions, I minister vnto you and to your parishoners by the kinges highnes auctority to me committed in this part, which I charge and commaund you by the same authoritye, to obserue & kepe, vpō paine of depriuation, sequestratiō of your fruites, or such other cohercion as to the kyng or his vicegerent for thys tyme beyng, shalbe sene conuenient.

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By these Articles and Iniunctions thus commyng forth one after an other, for the necessarye instruction of the people, it may appeare, how well the kyng deserued then the title of his supreme gouernement, gyuen vnto him ouer the Church of England: by the whiche title and authoritie, he did more good for the redressyng MarginaliaThe king better deseruing the name of supreme gouernour, then the Pope.and aduauncing of Christes Church and religion here in England, in these three yeares, then the Pope, the great Vicare of Christ, with all his Byshops and Prelates, had done the space of iij. hundreth yeares before. Such a vigilant care was then in the kyng and in hys Counsaile, how by alwayes & meanes, to redresse religiō, to reforme errours, to correct corrupt customes, to helpe ignoraūce, & to reduce þe misleadyngs of Christes flocke drowned in blynd Poperie, superstition, customes, and Idolatrie, to some better forme of more perfect reformation. Whereunto hee prouided not onely these articles, preceptes, and Iniunctions aboue specified, to informe the rude people: but also procured the Bishops to helpe forward in the same cause of decayed doctrine, with their diligent preachyng and teaching of the people, MarginaliaRead afore pag. 1200. col. 2.accordyng as ye heard before pag. 1200. how that in the yeare. 1534. duryng all the whole tyme of the Parlamēt, there was appoynted euery sonday a Byshop to preache at Paules Crosse agaynst the supremacie of the Byshop of Rome. Amongest whiche Byshops, Iohn Longland Byshop of Lincolne, the kynges confessor, and a great persecutor of the poore flocke of Christ MarginaliaRead afore page. 1119.(as is before sufficientlye recorded, pag. 1119.) made a Sermon before the king, vppon good Fridaye, thys present yeare. 

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Bishop Longland's sermon

This block of text consists of a small portion from the 'Oremus' part (no sig - Dii) of the sermon preached by Bishop John Longland of Lincoln on Good Friday (19 April) 1538 before King Henry VIII at Greenwich, printed that same year as A sermonde made before the kynge his maiestye at grenewiche, vpon good frydaye. The yere of our Lorde God. M.D.xxxviij. By Ioh[a]n Longlonde, busshop of Lincolne. Ad gloriam Christi, & ad memoriam gloriosæ passionis eius. Cum priuilegio ad imprimendum solum (London: Thomas Petyt, 1538) - STC 16796. Foxe's choice of the passage had everything to do with its powerful polemic about Christ as the 'Pontifex fidelis' and how the bishop of Rome had 'outrageously usurpeth upon God'. Longland's preaching style no doubt pleased Foxe. He had been a friend of Erasmus (addressing him as 'his chosen friend'), and Erasmus had dedicated his Discourse on the Fourth Psalm (1525), his translation of Athanasius (1527), and his treatise on Psalm 85 (1528) to him. After the execution of Thomas More, however, that friendship somewhat cooled. Longland's polemic was carefully judged to suit the politics of the moment - just as his more contemplative Good Friday sermon before the king (also at Greenwich) two years earlier had been equally delicately crafted. As Bishop of Lincoln, Longland had not been immune, however, to the delicate advancement of members of his own family, advancing his brother, a nephew and a cousin to benefices in his diocese.

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David Loades

1538. at Grenwych, seriouslye and effectuouslye preachyng on the kinges behalfe, against the vsurped supremacie of the Byshop of Rome, the contentes of whose Sermon wholye to expresse, were here to long and tedious. So much as may suffice for our purpose, I thought should remayne to the posteritie, begynnyng at hys Theame, whiche then he tooke in hand to entreate vppon, written in the 13. chap. to the Hebrues, as followeth.

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¶ The Sermon of Iohn Longland Byshop of Lincolne, on good Friday, before the kyng at Grynwiche. an. 1538.

Marginalia1538.
A sermon of Bishop Longland before the kyng. an. 1538.
THe wordes of the Apostle are these: Habemus altare de quo edere non habent potestatem qui tabernaculo de seruiunt. Quorum enim animalium infertur sanguis pro peccato, in sancta per pontificem: horum corpora cremantur extra castra. Propter quod, & Iesus extra portam passus est. Exeamus igitur ad eum extra castra, improperium eius portātes.

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MarginaliaThe Theame.These are the wordes of the Apostle. Many thinges conteined in few wordes, and the English therof is this: We haue an aulter: we haue an aulter (saith the Apostle) an aulter, and a sacrifice vpon this aulter. And they that serueth the tabernacle, may not eate of this aulter, may not eate of the Sacrifice that is offered vpon this aulter. MarginaliaHebr. 13.For the Apostle here (Per metonymiam) doth put the aulter for that that is sacrificed vpon the aulter. The bloud of those beastes that were slayne for the Sacrifice, was brought into the holy secret hyghe place of the temple where the Arke was, betwene the hygh aulter (as ye wil say) and the veyle, by the Byshop, and there offred vp for the sinne of the people. The bodyes of the beastes that were burned without the pauilions or tentes, for the whiche, Propter quod: for whiche what? for the fulfillyng of which misterye. Also to verifie and fulfill the figure, and that the thing figured, might be correspondēt to the figure. Iesus suffered without the gate, to sanctifie the people by his bloud. Let vs go out therefore and suffer with Christ, bearyng hys obprobries and rebukes. These be the wordes of the Apostle now taken.

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I will by the helpe of our Lorde God, declare these wordes in order, euen as they do stand. Here is an aulter, here is a Sacrifice, here is a Byshop whiche did offer this Sacrifice, here is a tabernacle, a seruyng of the tabernacle, the bloud of the Sacrifice which was offered by the Byshop for the sinnes of the people, in the most holy place of the temple, & the bodyes of the beastes (whose bloud was offered) were burned without the tētes. And this was done the tenth day of the seuenth moneth. Ye heare now the wordes of the Apostle. Wherin appeareth the manifest figure of the Passion of our Sauiour Iesus Christ, whiche we this day do honour.

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In these wordes the Apostle toucheth the figure of the the law, and bringeth it to a spirituall vnderstāding. For it was cōmaunded in the lawe, in þe booke of Numbers, MarginaliaNum. 19.that the x. day of the vij. moneth, in the feast that was called the feast of the propitiation, of mercy, of remission, or

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