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1320 [1320]

K. Henry. 8. The disputation of Iohn Lambert before the king.

of Christ. Taylor excusing him self at that present for other businesse, willed hym to write his mynde, and to come agayne at more leysure.

Lambert was cōtented, and so departed. Who with in a while after, when he had written his mynde, came agayne vnto hym. MarginaliaLamberts argumēts.The summe of hys argumētes were ten, whiche he cōprehended in writyng, approuyng the truth of the cause, partly by the Scriptures, and partly by good reason, and by the Doctours. The which argumentes, although they came not all vnto our handes, yet such mē as were present at those affaires, reported them to be of great force and authoritie. And of a fewe which were borne away in memorye, the first reason was thys, gathered vpō Christes woordes, where it is sayd in the Gospell: This Cup is the new Testament.

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MarginaliaThe wordes of consecration chaunge not the cup: Ergo neyther do the wordes chaūge the breade corporally into the body.And if (sayth he) these woordes do not chaunge neither the Cup, neither the wine corporally into the new Testament: by lyke reason it is not agreable that the wordes spoken of the bread, should turne the bread corporally into the body of Christ.

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MarginaliaOne bodye can not fyll many places at once naturallye.An other reason was this: that it is not agreable vnto a naturall bodye to bee in two places or more at one tyme: wherefore it must folowe of necessitie, that either Christ had not a naturall body, or els truly accordyng to the common nature of a body, it can not be present in ij. places at once, and much lesse in many: that is to say, in heauen and in earth, on the right hand of hys father, and in the Sacrament.

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MarginaliaThe formes can not be without the subiect.Moreouer, a naturall body can not bee without hys forme and shape, cōditions, and accidentes, lyke as the accidentes and cōditions also can not be without theyr subiect or substaunce. Then, for somuch as in þe Sacrament there is no qualitie, quantitie, or cōdition of þe body of Christ, and finally no apparaunce at all, of fleshe: who doth not playnly perceiue that there is no transubstantiate body of his in the Sacrament? And to reason by the contrary: all the proper conditions, signes, and accidentes what soeuer they be pertaining vnto bread, we do see to be present in the Sacrament, whiche can not be there without the subiect: therefore we must of necessity confesse the bread to bee there. He added also many other allegations out of the Doctours. But to be short, this Taylor the preacher, whō I spake of before, willyng & desiryng (as is supposed) of a good mynde to satisfie Lambert in this matter, amongest other whom he tooke to counsaile, he also conferred with D. Barnes. MarginaliaD. Barnes.Which Barnes, although he did otherwise fauour the Gospell, and was an earnest preacher, notwithstādyng seemed not greatly to fauour this cause, fearyng peraduenture, that it would breede some let or hynderaunce amōgest the people, to þe preachyng of þe Gospell, which was now in a good forwardnesse, if such Sacramentaries should bee suffered: He persuaded Taylor by and by to put vp the matter vnto Thomas Cranmer Byshop of Caunterbury. And hereby may we see it truely verified, whiche William Tyndall before writyng to Iohn Frith, dyd note in Doct. Barnes, saying: that D. Barnes wilbe whote agaynst you. &c. pag. 1232. 

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In his marginal note to this passage, Foxe is trying to emphasize that Tyndale’s reluctance to discuss the Eucharist was only temporary.

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Vppon these originals, Lamberts quarell first began, & was brought vnto this point, that through the sinister doynges of many, it began of a priuate talke, to be a publicke & cōmon matter. For he was sent for by the Archbyshop and brought into the open Court, and forced to defend hys cause openly: MarginaliaThomas Cranmer Archbishop of Cantrebury fauoured not yet the Sacrament.for the Archbyshop had not yet fauoured the doctrine of the Sacrament, whereof afterward hee was an earnest professour. In that disputatiō, it is sayd, that Lambert did appeale frō the Byshops, to the kynges Maiestie. But howsoeuer the matter was, the rumor of that disputation, was by and by spread throughout the whole Court.

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I tolde you before, how that kyng Henry for two yeares past, shewyng the part of an hard husband, had beheaded Queene Anne his wife. Which deede did not onely greatly displease þe Germaine Princes (who for that onely cause had broken of the league with him, an. 1536.) but also many other good men in England. Moreouer, how that within a while after, Abbayes began to be subuerted, and all theyr goodes to be confiscate and geuen abroad. For which causes, but especially for the late abolishyng of the Byshop of Rome, the commons had conceyued a very euill opinion of hym, in so much that the seditious sort rebelled agaynst him.

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MarginaliaStephen Gardiner bishop of Winchester.At that tyme Steuē Gardiner then Bishop of Winchester, was in authoritie amongest þe kyngs Counsellers 

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In these passages, Foxe tries to place the blame for Lambert's prosecution and away from Henry VIII, Barnes, Cranmer and Cromwell, who were truly responsible.

: who as he was of a cruell nature, so was he no lesse of a subtile and crafty witte, euer gapyng for some occasion how to let & hynder the Gospell: albeit a long time he was not so greatly estemed with þe king, that he could much preuaile to achiue hys conceaued purpose: But at length, vpon this matter aduising hym selfe, he thought hee had apte occasion and oportunitie to accomplishe his desire. MarginaliaThe pernicious councell of the bishop of Winchester.Neither did he forslacke the occasion ministred, but went straight vnto the kyng, priuely admonishing him, and with fayre flattering wordes, geuyng hym most pernitious counsell, declaryng how great hatred and suspition was raysed vpō him, almost in all places:

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First, for abolishyng the Byshop of Romes authoritie, then for subuersion of the Monasteryes, and also for that the diuorcement of Queene Katherine was yet freshe in mens myndes: and now the tyme serued, if he would take it, easelye to remedy all these matters, and pacifie the myndes of them, whiche were offēded with hym, if onely in this matter of Iohn Lambert, he would manifest vnto the people, how stoutly he would resiste heretickes: and by this new rumor hee shoulde bryng to passe, not onely to extinguishe all other former rumors, and as it were with one naile to driue out an other, but also should discharge hym selfe of all suspition, in that he now began to bee reported to be a fauourer of newe Sectes and opinions.

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The kyng geuyng eare more willyngly, then prudently or godly to this Syrene, immediatly receyued the wicked coūsaile of the Byshop, MarginaliaThenobles and bishopes assembled to Lamberts disputation.& by and by sent out a generall commission, cōmaundyng all the nobles and Byshops of this realme, to come with all speede, to Lōdon, to assiste the king agaynst heretickes and heresies, whiche the kyng him selfe would sit in iudgement vpō. These preparations made, a day was set for Lambert, where a great assembly of the nobles was gathered frō all partes of the Realme, not without much wonder and expectation in this so straūge a case. All the seates and places were full of men round about the scaffold.

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MarginaliaLambert brought before the king to dispute.By and by the godly seruaunt of Christ Iohn Lambert was brought from the prison with a garde of armed men, euen as a Lambe to fight with many Lions, and placed right ouer against where the kynges royall seat was, so that now they taryed but for the kynges commyng to the place.

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At the last the kyng hym selfe dyd come as Iudge of that great controuersie, with a great garde, clothed all in white, as couering by that colour and dissimuling seueritie of all bloudy iudgement.

On hys right hand sate the Byshops, and behynd them the famous Lawyers, clothed all in purple, accordyng to the maner. On þe left hand sat the Peeres of the Realme, the Iustices, & other Nobles in their order: behynde whom satte the Gentlemen of the kynges priuye Chamber. And thys was the maner and forme of the iudgement, whiche albeit it was terrible inough of it selfe, to abash any innocent, MarginaliaThe kinges sterne loke agaynst Lambert.yet the kynges looke, his cruell countenaunce, and hys browes bent vnto seuerity, did not a litle augment this terror, playnly declaryng a minde full of indignatiō farre vnworthy such a Prince, especially in such a matter and agaynst so hūble and obedient a subiect.

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When the kyng was set in hys throne, he behelde Lambert with a sterne countenaunce, & then turnyng hym selfe vnto his counsaillours, hee called forth Doct. Day Bishop of Chechester, commaundyng hym to de-

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