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1394 [1394]

K. Henry. 8. The storye and life of the Lord Thomas Cromwell Earle of Eßex.

day, to resort vnto Paules to S. Dunstones Chapell, and when he had spoken with his brethren, he would then tell her more. Other aūswere could she not get at that time. Wherfore she went vnto M. Wilkinson, thē beyng Shyriffe of London, desiring hym to be good vnto her, and that she might haue her poore husband out of prison. Vnto whō M. Wilkinson aūswered: MarginaliaThe gentle wordes of M. Wylkinson Shriefe of London to the poore woman.O womā Christ hath layd a peece of hys crosse vpō thy necke to proue whether thou wilt helpe him to beare it or no, saying moreouer to her that if þe Lord Maior had sent hym to his Counter, as he sent hym to his brothers, he should not haue taried there an houre, and so commaūded her to come the next day vnto hym to dynner, & he would do the best for her he could. So þe next day came, and this womā resorted agayne to M. Wilkynsons accordyng as hee bad her, who also had bydden diuers gestes: vnto whō he spake in her behalfe. But as they were set at dinner, and she also sitting at the table, whē she sawe the whote fishe come in, she fell downe in a swound, so that for the space of two houres they could kepe no life in her. Wherfore they sent her home to her house in Pater noster row, & then they sent for þe mydwife supposing þt she would haue ben deliuered incōtinent of her child that she went with, but after that, she came somewhat agayne vnto her selfe, where she lay sicke and kept her bed þe space of xv. weekes after, being not able to helpe her selfe, but as she was holpen of others, duryng that tyme of xv. weekes.

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MarginaliaThat God ordeyneth to be eaten superstitiō buryeth.Now to shewe further what became of thys pigge, whereof we haue spoken so much, it was caryed into Finsbury field by the Byshop of Londons Somner at hys Maisters commaundement and there buryed. The Monday folowyng beyng the iiij. day after that this prisoner aforesayd was apprehended, the Maior of London, with the residue of hys brethren beyng at Guild hall, sent for the prisoner aforenamed, and demaunded sureties of him for his forth cōming, what soeuer hereafter should or might be layd vnto his charge, MarginaliaThomas Frebarne deliuered out of prison.but for lacke of such sureties as they required, vpō his own bond which was a recognisance of xx. l. he was deliuered out of their handes. But shortly after þt he was deliuered out of this his trouble, MarginaliaThomas Frebarne discharged out of hys house by M. Garter his Landlorde.M. Garter of whō we haue spokē before, beyng hys land lorde, warned hym out of his house, so that in iiij. yeares after he could not get an other, but was constrayned to bee within other good folkes to hys great hynderaunce and vndoyng.

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Hard it were, and almost out of number to rehearse the names and stories of all them, which felt the gentle helpe of this good man in some case or other. MarginaliaGraye a Smyth accused of heresie, and deliuered by the Lord Cromwell.Where myght be remembred the notable deliueraunce of one Graye, a Smyth of Byshops Starford, who being accused for denying the Sacrament of the altar to be our Sauiour, was sent vp for the same to London & there should haue bene condemned to be burnt, but that by the meanes of þe L. Cromwel, he was sent home again and deliuered. One other example, though it be somewhat long, with the circumstances & all, I will declare, how he helped the Secretarye that then was to Doct. Cranmer Archb. of Canterbury, which Secretarye is yet aliue, and can beare present recorde of the same.

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¶ How the Lord Cromwell helped Cranmers Secretarye.

MarginaliaThe Archbyshop Cranmer disputed iij. dayes in the Parlamēt against the vj. Articles.MEntion was made before how king Henry in the yeare of hys reigne 21. caused the vj. Articles to passe, much agaynst the mynd and contrary to the consent of the Archbyshop of Canterbury Thomas Cranmer, who had disputed three dayes agaynst the same in the Parlament house, with great reasons and authorities. Which Articles after they were graūted and past by the Parlament, the kyng for the singular fauour whiche he euer bare to Cranmer, and reuerence to his learnyng, beyng desirous to know what he had sayd & obiected in þe Parlamēt agaynst these Articles, or what could be alleaged by learnyng agaynst the same, required a note of the Archbyshop of hys doynges, what he had sayd and opposed in the Parlament touchyng that matter. And this word was sent to hym from the kyng by Cromwell, and other Lordes of the Parlament, whom the kyng then sent to dyne with hym at Lambeth, somwhat to comfort agayne his greued mynde, & troubled spirites, as hath ben aboue recited. pag. 1298.

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Wherupon when this dinner was finished, the next day after the Archbishop collectyng both his argumēts, authorities of Scriptures, and Doctors together, caused hys Secretarie  

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This was Ralph Morice, who provided Foxe with considerable information, largely relating to Cranmer and Henry VIII, and who is Foxe's source for this story.

to write a fayre booke 
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I.e., a copy of the book in a highly legible secretary hand.

therof for the king, after this order. First the Scriptures were alledged, then the Doctours, thirdlye folowed the Argumentes deducted frō those authorities. This boke was written in hys Secretaries chamber. Where in a bye chamber lay the Archbyshops Almosiner. When this booke was fayre written, & whiles the Secretarie MarginaliaThe name of this Secretarye was M. Rafe Morice, being yet aliue.was gone to deliuer the same vnto the Archbyshop his master, who was (as it then chaunced) ridde to Croydon: returning backe to hys chamber, found hys doore shut, and the key caryed away to London by the Almosiner.

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At this season also chaūced the father of the sayd Secretarie to come to the Citie, by whose occasiō it so fell out, þt he must nedes go to Lōdon. The booke he could not lay into hys chamber, neither durst he committe it to any other person to keepe, beyng straitly charged in any condition of the Archbyshop hys master, to be circumspect therof, so that he determined to go to hys father and to kepe the booke about hym. And so thrustyng the booke vnder hys girdill, hee went ouer vnto Westminster bridge with a sculler 

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A small boat steered and propelled by a single oar in the stern.

, where he entered into a whirry 
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A light rowed boat suitable for navigation on rivers.

that went to London, wherin were iiij. of the garde, who ment to land at Paules wharfe, & to passe by þe kings highnes, who then was in his Barge with a great number of Barges & boates about hym, then baiting of Beares in þe water ouer agaynst the bancke.

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These foresayd yomen of the garde, whē they came agaynst the kynges Barge, they durst not passe bye towardes Paules wharfe, lest they should be espyed, and therfore entreated the Secretary to goe with thē to the Bearebaytyng, and they would finde þe meanes, being of the garde, to make rowme and to see all the pastyme. the Secretary perceiuyng no other remedy, assented therto. When þe whirry came nye the multitude of the boates, they with pollaxes got in the whirry so farre, that beyng compassed with many other whirryes and boates, there was no refuge if þe Beare should breake loose and come vppon them: as in very deede within one pater noster 

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I.e., within the space of time it took to recite the Lord's Prayer.

while, the Beare brake loose and came into the boate where the yomen of þe garde were and the said Secretary. MarginaliaTalle yomen but ill kepers.The garde forsooke the whirry & went into an other Barge, one or ij. of them leapyng short & so fell into the water. The Beare & the dogges so shaked þe whirry wherin the Secretary was, that the boate being ful of water, soncke to þe ground, and being also as it chaunced, an ebbyng tyde, hee there sat in the end of the whirry vp to the midle in water. MarginaliaA Bearebayting vpon Thamys before the kyng.To whom came the Beare & all the dogges. The Beare seekyng as it were, ayde and succour of hym, came backe with hys hynder partes vppon hym, and so rushyng vppon him, MarginaliaThe booke of D. Cranmer agaynst the vi. Articles lost in the Thames.the booke was losed from hys gyrdle and fell into the Thamys out of hys reach.

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The flying of þe people, after that þe Beare was loose, from one boate vnto an other, was so comberous, that diuers persons were throwne into the Thamys, the kyng commaunding certeine men that could swimme, to strippe thē selues naked and to helpe to saue them that were in daunger. This pastyme so displeased the kyng that hee bad away away with the Beare, and let vs all go hence.

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The Secretary perceiuyng hys booke to fleete away in the Thamys, called to the Beareward  

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A bearwarden, the keeper of the bear's used in the bear-baiting.

MarginaliaThys Bearewarde was Princesse Elizabethes seruaunt.to take vp the booke. When the Bearewarde had the booke in hys custodie, beyng an errant Papiste, farre from the Religiō of hys Mistres (for hee was the Lady Elizabethes Beareward, now the Queenes maiestie) ere that þe Se-

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cretary
PPP.j.
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